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King Cake for Mardi Gras


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Hi ,

Has anyone ever made King Cake? My customers are starting to inquire and I would love to accommodate them. Is it difficult? What about the baby? I assume that is inserted after the cake is baked. Anyone have a recipe they would be willing to share or a site where I can obtain one?

Thanks in advance for your assistance.

Edited by celenes (log)

Believe, Laugh, Love

Lydia (aka celenes)

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I've never made one, but I've eaten plenty, and as far as I am concerned they're just a big-ass cinnamon roll. So find a cinnamon roll recipe, make that, color the icing purple and green, and you should be good to go.

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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I've never made one, but I've eaten plenty, and as far as I am concerned they're just a big-ass cinnamon roll. So find a cinnamon roll recipe, make that, color the icing purple and green, and you should be good to go.

You're certainly right about that. About this time of year I get requests for King Cakes too, and I don't take them on because they're overrated, ugly, and don't taste that good. Yeah, you want a big-ass cinnamon roll with a plastic baby and yellow, green and purple icing? Go here!

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I've never made one, but I've eaten plenty, and as far as I am concerned they're just a big-ass cinnamon roll. So find a cinnamon roll recipe, make that, color the icing purple and green, and you should be good to go.

You're certainly right about that. About this time of year I get requests for King Cakes too, and I don't take them on because they're overrated, ugly, and don't taste that good. Yeah, you want a big-ass cinnamon roll with a plastic baby and yellow, green and purple icing? Go here!

O.k got it and wow I didn't realize the pricing was quite that high. Gee, and the one in the picture is not even close to looking nice.

I think I can handle it, doesn't look as complicated as I thought.

Believe, Laugh, Love

Lydia (aka celenes)

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There have been quite a few previous discussions on eGullet regarding King Cakes. If you do a search, you should be able to find some.

Of particular note is this thread: All About King Cakes which offers several recipes and other information.

 

Host's note: the link above no longer works, but it pointed to this recipe in RecipeGullet: King Cake.

Edited by Smithy
Added host's note and updated link (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Here's a good recipe--I only cook for 5 right now, so I divided it in half--it worked fine.

King Cake

(6 serv) 12 serv

(1) 2 packages dry active yeast

(1/4) 1/2 cup sugar

(4) 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

(3) 5 egg yolks

(1/2) 1 cup warm milk (110 degrees F)

(2-3) 4 to 5 cups all-purpose flour

(1) 2 teaspoons salt

(½) 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

(½) 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest

Vegetable oil

(4) 8 ounces cream cheese

(1 1/4) 2 1/2 cups powdered sugar

Juice of (½) one lemon

(1) 2 tablespoons milk

Purple, green and gold sugar sprinkles

Plastic baby toy, whole almond, pecan half, or favabean

Combine the yeast, sugar, butter, and egg yolks in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook. Add the milk.

With the mixer on low speed, beat the mixture for about 4 minutes to dissolve the yeast.

If the yeast mixture doesn't begin to foam after a few minutes, it means it's not active and will have to be replaced.

In a separate large mixing bowl, combine the flour, salt, nutmeg, and lemon zest. Add this mixture to the yeast mixture.

Mix on low speed until it lightly comes together, then increase the speed to medium and beat until the mixture pulls away from the sides of the bowl, forms a ball, and climbs slightly up the dough hook.

Remove the dough from the bowl.

Coat the dough with vegetable oil.

Return the dough to the bowl and turn it to oil all sides.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, set in a warm, draft-free place, and let rise until doubled in size, about 2 hours.

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the cream cheese and 1/2 cup powdered sugar. Mix well.

In another small bowl, combine the remaining powdered sugar, lemon juice and milk. Mix well and set aside.

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface.

Roll the dough out (15)30 inches long and 6 inches wide.

Spread the cream cheese filling across the center of the dough.

Bring the two long edges together and seal all sides completely.

Using your hands shape the dough into a long cylinder and place on a greased baking sheet, seam side down.

Shape the dough into a ring.

Place a well-greased 2 pound coffee can or shortening can in the center of the ring to maintain the shape during baking.

Press the plastic baby toy into the ring from the bottom so that it is completely hidden by the dough.

Cover the ring with a towel and place in a warm, draft free place.

Let the dough rise for about 45 minutes or until the dough doubles in size.

Preheat the oven to 350 deg.F.

With a sharp knife, make several slits around the top of the ring.

Place in the oven and bake for 30 minutes, or until golden brown. After baking remove the coffee can immediately.

Allow the cake to cool.

Drizzle the cake with the sugar glaze.

Sprinkle the cake with sprinkles, alternating colors.

Cut the cake into individual pieces and serve.

Yield: (6) 12 servings

Prep Time: 2 hours 40 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes

It's not the destination, but the journey!
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Gah! that picture looks vile. Where's the putrid green smiley when you need it?

I know that the New Orleans king's cake is much different than the traditional French Galette des Rois, but personally, give me one of these over that gawdy thing any day.

gallery_17645_490_1105658835.jpg

"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

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I know that the New Orleans king's cake is much different than the traditional French Galette des Rois, but personally, give me one of these over that gawdy thing any day.

Beautiful beautiful Galette des Rois jgarner! Just wondering......it seems that the little lima

bean inside is the only difference between that and a Pithiviers.....true? :rolleyes:

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My company is based out of New Orleans, so they send me a King Cake every year. I never eat it, but send it with my wife to work. She works at the main branch (downtown) public library and the employees get a huge kick out of it. So they can be fun. And they do usually look exactly as ugly as the one posted above.

However, I would eat one of jgarner's Galette des Rois ANY time!! That thing looks tasty!!!!

What is it?

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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It's puff pastry with a crème d'amandes filling (crème d'amandes is pastry cream mixed with ground almonds, eggs, sugar and rum). Galette des rois is also done with frangipane. It's quite, quite tasty.

"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

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Yes, they are ugly and not particularly tasty (a big coffee cake, basically), but mostly they're just an excuse for a party, so what's not to like?

Whoever gets the baby (I don't actually eat much of the cake, I just look for the baby) has to host the party the next year.

Can you pee in the ocean?

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The good ones aren't "a big ass cinamon roll". humpph.

The dough is made with egg, then kneaded like a bread, to develop some of the gluten. The dough is split into three sections, flattened and filled, then rolled into ropes. Those ropes are braided, then formed into a circle. The only thing this has in common with a cinnamon roll is the cinnamon.

If you don't like the colored sugar, you can just use colored icing instead. I wouldn't do that in the city limits of New Orleans - or most of the surrounding countryside - but in Ohio, go for it. It's not traditional, but what the hell.

Big ass cinnamon roll. sheeze...

Screw it. It's a Butterball.
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Not that there is anything wrong with a "big ass cinnamon roll"-they have their place-primarily airports- but he's right. A "real" king cake is pretty much brioche split into three ropes (filled or not-I have seen fights break out over this-go to Lousiana Form and you can see one from last year), braided, and baked. They are then covered with purple. green, and gold GRANULATED sugar. Icing is wrong. Keep that stuff for cupcakes and other stuff that Yankees eat.

STRAIGHT GRANULATED SUGAR is the only thing that will get you moving in the morning after a long night of parading. That and some dark roast will get you to lunch, and then you are trying to get out of work anyway, so you don't have to go much more than that- You need to have the kids loaded up and be headed out to the parade by 4 on weekdays, so who needs a long day.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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People that don't understand King Cake probably only had one from the Winn-Dixie bakery. A real King Cake is a delight.

I agree that there are a butt load of bad ones, but isn't that true of most things. The cheaper you go, the worse it gets. I can get a king cake here in Tulsa, but I just wouldn' t do that to myself. It is not the same as one from Maurice's or your Mama's house.

As for the baby Jesus, I sure do wish I could find one of the old metal one.

And it is all about the PARTY. You all have a good time without me, I am saving up for Jazzfest, it is only 15 weeks before they throw open the gates and I will be there this year. For Sure.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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  • 2 weeks later...
Gah! that picture looks vile. Where's the putrid green smiley when you need it?

I know that the New Orleans king's cake is much different than the traditional French Galette des Rois, but personally, give me one of these over that gawdy thing any day.

gallery_17645_490_1105658835.jpg

I picked up one similar to this today from a local Bakery (Main Street Bakery -- Grapevine, TX) and did a search because I wasn't familiar with King's Cake. So looks like there are two kinds. This one is mighty tasty.

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For "real King Cakes" you go to Gambinos in New Orleans.

Richard for "real King cakes here in DFW"

Big Easy

or Central Market

A good King Cake Recipe here

They are not giant sweet rolls. Would I eat them daily, well probably not, but a great indulgence for this time of year.

Never trust a skinny chef

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  • 15 years later...

I'll make several this year, likely next week. I make them and give them to folks that didn't get Christmas treats.

 

Here's one from two or three years ago.

 

king-cake.jpg.ccdcaa9f85c1d9c16d1bcb05c42eadd0.jpg

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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1 hour ago, Shelby said:

If I do one, I do for Mardi Gras.  I'm not sure I'll do one this year.  Sometimes I make a little batch of cinnamon rolls and sprinkle with purple, gold and green sanded sugar for a cheat.

 

I like this.  Just the right amount

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My tradition is more the Fastnacht fried donuts with the coin but I enjoy the King cake tradition and look forward to those you all make and show. A friend whose family is in a major Krewe is a tall gorgeous model who swears King cake has no calories ;)

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12 hours ago, heidih said:

It was delicious! We will be making more this weekend in smaller individual portions (we would love to have some of your friend's magical genes @heidih, these things are calorie bombs 😂). 

 

The Modernist Bread's recipe we used was a bit more bread-like and dense than the texture we are used to in Europe. This time we will be trying a recipe from one of our favourite Basque chefs, Martín Berasategui. We report back with photos!

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As promised here are the results. 

 

150g buns covered with the same pâte sablée as Modernist Bread's version and candied kumquat slices. We preferred this dough much better. It's lighter, intensely perfumed and very delicate. 

 

DSC_0366.thumb.jpg.a53e9bec37dcb6292a20402ffb2276c1.jpg

 

Served in a Sicilian style as brioche e granita for breakfast with hazelnut ice cream. Very indulgent.

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