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chefcyn

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  1. Hmmm...looking at the recipe, I see it calls for water and lemon juice to make the caramel. I never used anything but just granulated sugar. The water may make it chewy if it's not cooked all the way out. The lemon juice is to help prevent the sugar from crystalizing in the water as it boils, so that may contribute to the chewiness--you could do without that and the water and make a nice simple caramel. Other than that, the desired effect is for the caramel layer to dissolving into sauce when you serve the custard. What makes that happen is making sure it's really caramelized to very dark golden brown--like the color of good mapke syrup or very dark honey, and then, making sure you're using the proper size ramekins--too narrow will make it very thick and it will take much longer to dissolve properly in the moisture from the custard. The next thing is making sure you wait long enough before inverting it. The longer you wait, the more it "melts" into the caramel sauce when you invert it. At least that's been my experience. We always made them at least the day before we needed them to be sure to get the maximum 'sauce' out of the ramekin when we inverted them onto the plates. I never had it come out chewy no matter what I did or what recipe I followed, because whatever didn't scome out as 'sauce', stuck to the bottom of the remekin and had to soak for hours to remove.
  2. Here's the ingredients list with conversion to US ounces (weight not volume at the top, volume for the liquids) 250 gr de sucre 8 oz sugar 1 pincée de sel a pinch of salt 4 œufs 4 eggs 200 gr de noix de coco râpé 7 oz coconut 200 gr de farine 7 oz of flour 1 càc de poudre à lever 1 tsp baking powder ou 5-6 fruits de la passion, pulpe détachée des coques avec une càc (donne 1 ¼ dl) 5-6 passion fruits (4 oz(volume) passion fruit puree) 1 ½ dl de jus d’ananas 5 oz (volume) pineapple juice fat:10g protein 4g carbs 28 g calories: 215 preheat to 350F
  3. I saw a reference to a semifriddo describing it as a cross between a mousse and gelato. There's one more thing to research!
  4. Whisky Fudge This recipe is from the website http://www.scotlandforvisitors.com/wfudge.php and I've varied the instructions just enough to publish here, added the American weights and measures in the ingredients list and added some storage and freezing hints. Whisky Fudge Ingredients: 1 Kilo white sugar (2.2 lb) 300 grams butter (10.5 oz) 1 tin Nestles sweet condensed milk 1 tea cup of (Scottish, Scotch) whisky (5 oz) 2 pints of freshly made, plain, hot tea Method Melt butter in a large saucepan, then add the tea. Add all sugar stir continuously until all the sugar has melted. Stir in the milk and whisky and stir continuously until the correct consistency is reached (about 10 to 15 min.--soft ball stage on a thermometer). Without a thermometer, to check the consistency have a cup of ice cold water handy and add a teaspoon of the mixture to it from time to time until it sets firm in the water--makes a "soft ball" Pour into a large buttered tray and when just firm enough to keep the shape, cut it into bite sized squares. Layer for storage between waxed paper, tin foil or parchment in an airtight container. The fudge can be frozen to keep for up to three months, wrap well with plastic wrap and put in an airtight container. Keywords: Candy, Intermediate, Chocolate, Snack ( RG1664 )
  5. I'm a little jealous of that find--I bought the very same, one brand new, last year on sale for $18.95! I really, really wanted to make some spritz cookies, and couldn't find my old one anywhere! Of course, just after all the cookies were done and out of my system, I found not one, but two old aluminum spritzers with all the dies and stuff! It made me reorganize all my kitchen cabinets, to know where everything is again!
  6. Whisky Fudge Ingredients: 1 Kilo white sugar (2.2 lb) 300 grams butter (10.5 oz) 1 tin Nestles sweet condensed milk 1 tea cup of whisky (5 oz) 2 pints of freshly made, hot, milkless tea Method Melt butter in a large saucepan, then add the tea. Add all sugar stir continuously until all the sugar has melted. Stir in the milk and whisky and stir continuously until the correct consistency is reached (about 10 to 15 min.--soft ball stage on a thermometer). Without a thermometer, to check the consistency keep a cup of cold water handy and add a teaspoon of the mixture to it from time to time until it sets firm in the water Pour into a large buttered tray and when just barely firm, cut it into bite sized squares.
  7. Here's a site full of recipes from Scotland for Visitors: scottish recipes
  8. Is there any non-commercial place to get liquid glucose in fairly large quantities (read: inexpensive)? I think I've seen it with Wilton cake supplies, but it was a pretty small bottle. I live in northeast CT, so I can get to Boston or Providence pretty easily. Or an online source?
  9. Smacking it with the rolling pin can also put dents in your rolling pin--even a good hardwood pin wil dent if hit just right.
  10. Here's a link to their actual recipe: Jell-o Ribbon Mold Recipe
  11. I would like to insert here some information about being a non-traditional chef. I've loved food and cooking since I can remember and have been cooking for my family since I could read a cookbook and reach the top of the counters! I used to spend my babysitting money on interesting ingredients to make "exotic" foods like Shrimp Tempura and Indian candies, like Burfi. Back then, I'd never even eaten in a Chinese Restaurant, or much of anyplace besides McDonald's--we had a big family and no budget for "dining out". But I read cookbooks and grew veggies and ate my grandmothers' cooking (one from Canada, one from Mississippi--with all that that entails in variety). I grew up and got married, and learned how to cook "normal" food like macaroni and cheese from scratch, meatloaf, spaghetti, etc, because we didn't have a lot of money then either. Then I found myself a single mom and faced with finding out what I wanted to be when I grew up--now. I went to college and took accounting, then, when that proved a bad idea, I took sciences, art, history, everything I could try because I just had no clue what to do for a living--I had job experience at McDonald's and in retail till then. What I'd really like to be is a profesisonal student! One day when I was whipping up some trays of fabulous canapes for a Hallowe'en party, my best friend said "Why don't you go to cooking school?" I'd never even thought of it before, didn't really know anything about it--I had a vague idea about Cordon Bleu and France, but that was way out of my range of possibilities. Well, I ended up going to Johnson and Wales in Providence, got a restaurant job after my first semester and kept on working to pay my way through school. In the ten years that followed my graduation, I worked in fine dining restaurants(in the pantry because it seemed to be where they hired women to cook back then, if you weren't in the FOH), as well as on the line when I finally got a clue and stood up for myself, family restaurants, fast food, and small concessions, private eating clubs at a college, Fraternities and Sororities at universities, foodservice director at summer camps, and have been Exec Chef at a couple of places as well, from casual dining to Upscale Inn. I burned out of food at about the average ten-year mark, and went back into retail, which I still enjoyed, and about 6 years later I yearned once again for the smell of fried things in my hair, and went back to work in kitchens. I now work in a private residence where I get to cook anything I want, make my own schedule, do all the shopping and dishes, clean some, and get to spend time on the computer or watching TV because I can multi-task my menu through the day, making my time my own. I get paid a more-than-decent wage with great health insurance and 2 wks paid vacation time, and I like it. I think of myself as semi-retired sometimes, because I play more than I work in a given day. All this is just to say that slaving/stressing in a hot restaurant kitchen for 40-60+ hours, while fun for some, isn't the only way to make a living in food. True, I'm not raking in millions, but I have everything I need and a little more for fun. How much more can anyone ask out of life? I wouldn't push your daughter so hard you scare her out of the industry or make her end up hating food. France may be very different from here, so I don't really know how to advise you, but thinking outside the box can also offer some solutions. Though, if you are trying to scare her back into studying and working harder at school, it might just work!
  12. One definition of the word is "conducive to or characteristic of physical or moral well-being" which, when referring to food, should lean more toward "healthy" than "hearty necessarily--"hearty" usually implies lots of meat and fat, which is not particularly healthy ion general, though these two definitions may seem otherwise: " providing abundant nourishment; "a hearty meal"; "good solid food"; "ate a substantial breakfast"; "four square meals a day" endowed with or exhibiting great bodily or mental health; "a hearty glow of health" To me, personally, when I think hearty, I think beef stew. When I think of wholesome, I think of wholegrain bread.
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