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Tipping for Takeout and Delivery

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I think you've got the right attitude, Goatjunky, here's the way I look at things.

-Somebody has to take the order,

-give it to the kitchen,

-pick it up from the kitchen,

-gather all the things like napkins, disposables, sauces, condiments, etc.

-package it,

-give it to the customer,

-take the customer's money or card,

-give her/him back a reciept, and smile.

While this isn't worth, 20-25% of the bill, it is worth something, say 7-10%, and it is still customer service, anyway you look at it.

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So is picking up coffee and donuts. I don't tip them either.,

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I think you've got the right attitude, Goatjunky, here's the way I look at things.

-Somebody has to take the order,

-give it to the kitchen,

-pick it up from the kitchen,

-gather all the things like napkins, disposables, sauces, condiments, etc.

-package it,

-give it to the customer,

-take the customer's money or card,

-give her/him back a reciept, and smile.

While this isn't worth, 20-25% of the bill, it is worth something, say 7-10%, and it is still customer service, anyway you look at it.

Couldn't the exact same thing be said for every service establishment? Starbucks does the same things, even McDonalds, dunkin donuts, etc.etc.

i'm getting a little fed up at all the tip jars i see at every place that has a cashier.


Edited by jmolinari (log)
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I think you've got the right attitude, Goatjunky, here's the way I look at things.

-Somebody has to take the order,

-give it to the kitchen,

-pick it up from the kitchen,

-gather all the things like napkins, disposables, sauces, condiments, etc.

-package it,

-give it to the customer,

-take the customer's money or card,

-give her/him back a reciept, and smile.

While this isn't worth, 20-25% of the bill, it is worth something, say 7-10%, and it is still customer service, anyway you look at it.

I've worked this sort of job, and at one, there was a tip jar. I always put that thing away when I was the only one at the register: all those actions you list? those were part of the job description, I knew exactly what I was signing on for when I took the job. Accepting, let alone expecting, tips for that felt like panhandling (yes, I read too much L. M. Alcott growing up). Apart from everything else, even though the job didn't exactly pay big bucks, it wasn't under the minimum hourly wage, and less-than minimum wage is what tips are supposed to compensate for in this sort of setting (did I mind if someone tipped me anyway? of course not :wink: ).

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Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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I tip at full service restaurants where a bartender or server handles the order. Typically 10%.

I also tip at carryout places where there is a tip jar and where I am a regular or where the counter person goes out of his/her way. Usuallly a buck, maybe two. I figure it is a long term investment on future orders. I always tip baristas for the same reason.


Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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I think you've got the right attitude, Goatjunky, here's the way I look at things.

-Somebody has to take the order,

-give it to the kitchen,

-pick it up from the kitchen,

-gather all the things like napkins, disposables, sauces, condiments, etc.

-package it,

-give it to the customer,

-take the customer's money or card,

-give her/him back a reciept, and smile.

While this isn't worth, 20-25% of the bill, it is worth something, say 7-10%, and it is still customer service, anyway you look at it.

I've worked this sort of job, and at one, there was a tip jar. I always put that thing away when I was the only one at the register: all those actions you list? those were part of the job description, I knew exactly what I was signing on for when I took the job. Accepting, let alone expecting, tips for that felt like panhandling (yes, I read too much L. M. Alcott growing up). Apart from everything else, even though the job didn't exactly pay big bucks, it wasn't under the minimum hourly wage, and less-than minimum wage is what tips are supposed to compensate for in this sort of setting (did I mind if someone tipped me anyway? of course not :wink: ).

It is with great, uh.. trepidation, that I comment on your post.

Yes, I agree with you completely, all the items I listed are on the job description. I guess the point I was trying to make and wasn't successful with, was the point that those items are also on the full service server's job description.

Now in my town, Vancouver, we have a specialized delivery service for high end a'la carte restaurants. People will pay for take out of high end food. I don't know why, I don't know the reasons, but they do.

So on the one hand we have a couple who have a nice, long dinner at a restaurant, and on the other, a couple who have the same food at home. True, the restaurant couple get more service, but all of the basics are the same with both couples.

So, people tip 20% of the bill because they spend more time at the restaurant? Because of the decor and atmosphere? Is the server really responsible for decor and atmosphere?

I must now resist the urge to follow this thread. We will now see if my willpower holds.....

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It is with great, uh.. trepidation, that I comment on your post.

Yes, I agree with you completely, all the items I listed are on the job description. I guess the point I was trying to make and wasn't successful with, was the point that those items are also on the full service server's job description.

Now in my town, Vancouver, we have a specialized delivery service for high end a'la carte restaurants. People will pay for take out of high end food. I don't know why, I don't know the reasons, but they do.

So on the one hand we have a couple who have a nice, long dinner at a restaurant, and on the other, a couple who have the same food at home. True, the restaurant couple get more service, but all of the basics are the same with both couples.

So, people tip 20% of the bill because they spend more time at the restaurant? Because of the decor and atmosphere? Is the server really responsible for decor and atmosphere?

I must now resist the urge to follow this thread. We will now see if my willpower holds.....

This isn't intended to test your willpower regarding followup, but I think I buried my main point, which is that whereas waitstaff (in the US) tends to be paid below-minimum wages, making tips an essential part of their income, cashiers receive at least minimum wage, and therefore tipping them is purely a nice extra, feeling obligated to do so seems wrong.

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Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Around here tipping doesn't seem to be connected to the wage of the person, the importance of their job to us or the amount or type of work they do. It's just tradition.

Cabbie - optional

Waiter/waitress - yes

Hairdresser - optional

Barman/maid (in bar) - optional

Chambermaid/man - yes

But

Barman/maid (in pub) - no

Host/ess in restaurant - no

Nurse - no

Binman/woman - no

Cashier in shop - no

Postman/woman - no

Fast-food server - no

If I picked up takeaway for myself I wouldn't tip. If I did for the entire office I probably would leave 10-15%. No logic.


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)

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As a hostess at a very well-established, privately owned restaurant in my hometown, this is a topic I have found myself discussing quite often. Some may consider my opinion bias, but what I share with you is nothing short of the truth.

Takeout orders, at least at our restaurant, are handled by the hostess 90% of the time. This includes full communication with the customer, taking the order, placing the order, communication with the kitchen/chefs, preparing the same dishes that servers are responsible for prepping (soups, salads, etc.), dealing with the check, and delivering the impeccable order to the customers hands, fresh, warm and without ANY error.

While this is our responsibility, and frankly my favorite part of the job as is hands-on with food (my passion), it takes away from what can already be considered a hectic job.

And so the question remains: Do you or don't you have to tip on takeout orders?

Yes. Please DO. Whether you choose to dine in or outside of the restaurant, you are still requiring some form of personal service by one of the employees. 10% is totally appropriate and I can PROMISE you, greatly appreciated ... not to mention ALWAYS remembered.

there's some food for thought. :wink:

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As a hostess at a very well-established, privately owned restaurant in my hometown, this is a topic I have found myself discussing quite often. Some may consider my opinion bias, but what I share with you is nothing short of the truth.

Takeout orders, at least at our restaurant, are handled by the hostess 90% of the time. This includes full communication with the customer, taking the order, placing the order, communication with the kitchen/chefs, preparing the same dishes that servers are responsible for prepping (soups, salads, etc.), dealing with the check, and delivering the impeccable order to the customers hands, fresh, warm and without ANY error.

While this is our responsibility, and frankly my favorite part of the job as is hands-on with food (my passion), it takes away from what can already be considered a hectic job.

And so the question remains: Do you or don't you have to tip on takeout orders?

Yes. Please DO. Whether you choose to dine in or outside of the restaurant, you are still requiring some form of personal service by one of the employees. 10% is totally appropriate and I can PROMISE you, greatly appreciated ... not to mention ALWAYS remembered.

there's some food for thought. :wink:

So then you always tip at Burger King.

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Nope. Never.

It doesn't matter if it's the waiter, cashier, hostess, or owner who handles the order. It also doesn't matter if it's a high-end, low-end, or in-between-end restaurant.

I call (or online) my order in, get in my car, drive over, walk in and pick it up. Rush back home, grab real flatware, a drink and a real napkin and sit down to eat.

I then clean everything up, clear the table, trash everything, and wash the utensils.

Tip???? Don't think so.

:smile:


Edited by lochaven (log)
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And I want a table for two and a chicken for eight o'clock.

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As a hostess at a very well-established, privately owned restaurant in my hometown, this is a topic I have found myself discussing quite often. Some may consider my opinion bias, but what I share with you is nothing short of the truth.

Takeout orders, at least at our restaurant, are handled by the hostess 90% of the time. This includes full communication with the customer, taking the order, placing the order, communication with the kitchen/chefs, preparing the same dishes that servers are responsible for prepping (soups, salads, etc.), dealing with the check, and delivering the impeccable order to the customers hands, fresh, warm and without ANY error.

While this is our responsibility, and frankly my favorite part of the job as is hands-on with food (my passion), it takes away from what can already be considered a hectic job.

And so the question remains: Do you or don't you have to tip on takeout orders?

Yes. Please DO. Whether you choose to dine in or outside of the restaurant, you are still requiring some form of personal service by one of the employees. 10% is totally appropriate and I can PROMISE you, greatly appreciated ... not to mention ALWAYS remembered.

there's some food for thought. :wink:

The owners are taking tremendous advantage of your duties as a hostess. What in the world are the waitstaff doing while you are buzzing around doing their job? Are they seating patrons in their own sections?

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This is common. I dealt with the same thing in a high end steakhouse. There isn't enough take out orders to also warrant a cashier. Sometimes I even had to take room service orders. While I appreciated the tips, I definitely never expected them.

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The owners are taking tremendous advantage of your duties as a hostess. What in the world are the waitstaff doing while you are buzzing around doing their job? Are they seating patrons in their own sections?

I'm sure the waitstaff are just sitting around with their feet up smoking cigarettes and drinking coffee or having coctails. <sarcasm>


Edited by msfurious1 (log)
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So on the one hand we have a couple who have a nice, long dinner at a restaurant, and on the other, a couple who have the same food at home. True, the restaurant couple get more service, but all of the basics are the same with both couples.

So, people tip 20% of the bill because they spend more time at the restaurant? Because of the decor and atmosphere? Is the server really responsible for decor and atmosphere?

The restaurant couple gets more service, and the tip is about the quantity and quality of the service. I went out to lunch today with a friend and my daughter.

-Somebody has to take the order,

-give it to the kitchen,

-pick it up from the kitchen,

-gather all the things like napkins, disposables, sauces, condiments, etc.

-package it,

-give it to the customer,

-take the customer's money or card,

-give her/him back a reciept, and smile.

Someone did all that.

Plus:

- 3 or 4 check-ins as we waited for our table

- A round of drink orders

- 5 trips to the table to refill drinks

- A trip to get additional condiments that we decided we needed

- At least twice as much hands-on time ordering as I'd have gotten if I called the order in

- A stop by the table to bring my kid an extra pack of wiki sticks

- 3 passes to bus the table

- clearing/wiping the table and resetting

The service was divided between the hostess, our waiter and some runners, but what I'm tipping for isn't "preparing the food I ordered and delivering it to me" - I'm tipping for waitstaff that makes me feel welcomed, like they want me to have a good experience. I'm tipping for feeling taken care of. When I'm being a royal pain (allergies, special requests, indecisive, etc), I tip more, especially if they manage to make me not feel like an inconvenience.

Sometimes I tip for takeout, and sometimes I don't. When the bartender hands me my bag and says "We were out of the little packets of soy sauce, so I put some in one of these containers" or takes a minute to chat about the food, she gets a tip. When I order eight different coffees for the office and the barista labels them so I can tell them apart, puts the little stopper in, offers me cup holders, is cheerful about separate receipts and spends 30 seconds making friendly conversation? I tip. And that tip comes from me, not the people asking for coffee, because it was -my- life she improved.

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Until quite recently it didn't occur to me to tip for takeout. I've been thinking about it more recently after someone mentioned it to me, but it still seems pretty weird in the usual take out situation I find myself in - walk in, get handed bag of food, pay, leave.

When I do tip, it's usually in situations like ElaineK pointed out, where the order has been handled in such a way that it makes my life a little less hassle/a little more enjoyable. I suppose I'll have to try to remember to think about it a bit more - if I noticed, I'd probably tip some in situations where it was someone on the waitstaff who depended on tips to get a proper wage, just because they are doing something that takes time away from the tables they have and might reduce the tips they get there. Might have to ponder that.

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I frequent a local Papa Murphy's take-and-bake pizza place quite often. I tip $1 for my (usually $12 or so pizza) because:

I always call ahead and order by phone, and my pizza is ALWAYS ready when I arrive, and it is always perfectly made, and the employees are very courteous and pleasant. Otherwise I don't usually tip for a take out order unless something was out of the ordinary.

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You have a personal relationship with this pizza place and the OP does as well with the take out places she frequents. I do not. Therefore, I do not leave a tip for the person who hands me my coffee and points me to the salad bar.

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Depends.

At the local place where I get take out frequently and they know me? Sure. My order is always correct, it's always ready when I get there, and unless there's a new person behind the counter they know me when I walk in the door. So I toss them a couple bucks.

But that's the exception. My general rule is that I don't tip for take out.

Delivery is another story and I tip for delivery. But for places that charge a delivery fee or someplace that is litterally right down the street I don't usually tip as much as I would had there been no fee or the drive is going to take longer than a minute or two.

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I tip at full service restaurants where a bartender or server handles the order. Typically 10%.

I also tip at carryout places where there is a tip jar and where I am a regular or where the counter person goes out of his/her way. Usuallly a buck, maybe two. I figure it is a long term investment on future orders. I always tip baristas for the same reason.

I agree with Holly, that's about my philosophy. I'll tip a little extra at places where I'm a regular and routinely get good food/service. I generally believe that folks that work at restaurants probably aren't getting rich and they work hard so a little gratuity from people who can afford to take out dinner seems appropriate.

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We haven't used carryout in many many years.  

 

We recently discovered two eateries whose primary business is carryout (one an Asian restaurant, the other is a BBQ joint).  While both have limited seating, you rarely see people eating at either place as they don't have table service nor alcoholic beverage licenses. 

 

Both places have tip jars at the counter.  

 

My instinct is not to tip as the only service is selling me their food....same as if I go to the deli counters of grocery stores, where there are no tip jars. 

 

Do you tip at carryouts or not.  If you do, what percentage of the tab do you tip, or do you just leave a flat amount, like a buck or two?  

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I found myself in this situation recently at a major hotel, which a meeting ran long and I headed for the deli to grab sandwiches and chips. The bill came to $92. I was undecided as to whether to tip -- the counter staff took my order and made the sandwiches, as well as packing up a collection of condiments -- but the service was good enough I thought I should, so I did.


Don't ask. Eat it.

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I always tip everywhere (except maybe at places like MickeyD's or if there is no jar) ... bad habit of mine. At my favorite Thai take-out place, I tip generously (could be up to 50% depending on what I order and how much that comes to - it is usually a smaller percentage probably if the order is larger) because I have known the lady who owns it for years. When I get take-out from the Korean or Indian joints, it is usually a couple of dollar bills and whatever silver comes back to me when I pay for the order no matter what the size of the order.

So there is no set amount - it is what I feel like or have in my hand but I am probably stupidly generous at times.

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Like Deryn I usually tip and usually more than the "rules" suggest one should.

My takeouts are at family restaurants in my neighbourhood. I see how long they work and how little they charge and it seems like a good thing to do.

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Cheers,

Anne

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Am I correct in assuming that the cashiers are paid the minimum wage ($7.25), as opposed to wait staff whose minimum wage is $2.13?  

 

Neither of the places that I mentioned have table service and hence no wait staff.  

 

I have been throwing two bucks in when I pick up, just wondering if that's enough, or if it's not really expected.  I should add that my average order is usually $10-12 at either place.  


Edited by gulfporter (log)

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