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Mulcahy

Making Limoncello

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Hello, and thanks for all your comments on my Limoncello question..  

So, as an extension to this general topic (please let me know if I need to start a new thread for this), I wanted to ask your opinions on how long I should let the vodka and lemon zest sit given I DID NOT use 100 proof but the 40%/80 proof stuff..  My question is...........what is the minimal amount of time for this to turn out well..  My significant other and I are pretty impatient.....:)

Thanks in advance any info on this....!

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Try tasting what you have (by adding sugar and vodka or water). That said, I believe most people "rest" their lemoncello after its been made for quite a while. I make "Amer Boudreau", a homemade imitation of Amer Picon, and it definitely is better after it has rested in the bottle for a year. That said, I'm drinking the few-months-old batch right now because I ran out.

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Hello EvergreenDan, and thanks for your response back..

Please forgive, but I'm unsure what you are suggesting above..  Right now, I have the vodka and lemon zest together marrying..........and the sugar/water mix does not go in (according to my recipe anyway.........via Giada Laurentis) until the marinating has completed..  I'm just wondering how long I should allow this marinating to occur given the lower alcohol vodka I have used..

Thanks again to all info you guys can provide.... 

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I think what he's saying is tasting it is the only trustworthy way to judge how the extraction is going, so you can mix up a little microbatch with what you have (a very small amount of your vodka mixture and proportional bits of sugar and water to get your taster to target sweetness and proof) and decide from there if it needs more time or not.

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I used 80 proof when I made mine. I followed the instructions here which says "at least 2 weeks, until the peels look pale and the vodka is no longer gaining color or aroma". I didn't worry about additional time for difference in proof, I just started checking at the 2 week point and when I was satisfied nothing else was being gained, I continued with the production. I'm hoping there's no point of diminishing returns regarding shelf life, my batch made 1 1/2 750 ml bottles. I used the 1/2 bottle but the full bottle's been sitting unopened in my cabinet for close to 3 years.

Edit: correction - I just read the post in that linked discussion where I posted about making mine... it's been in the cabinet unopened for more like 6 years. Time flies...


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)
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Host's note: this refers to making Orangecello; two topics were merged.

 

I just ran across a recipe to make this.  Wow!  I have simply got to get started on it, it sounds amazing.

 

Recipe

 

Any suggestions as to where one would find a 64 oz. bottle (glass)?  Oh, never mind, just found a half gallon growler with lid on Amazon.


Edited by Smithy Added host's note (log)

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A number of people mentioned making orangecello/arancello over in the Limoncello topic.  Since the method is quite similar, you may find some helpful discussion over there.  

I only tried making a small batch of the orange version and ended up with a layer of orange oil on top - maybe because I used more peels than recommended.  The flavor was very nice though!

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Day two of my Orangecello mixture

 

 

22848378-F72B-40CB-888C-5C43E98B2449.jpeg


Edited by lindag (log)
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I hope I didn't make too big a mistake with my Orangecello; I removed the half vanilla bean and, because I didn't check the recipe carefully enough I went ahead and drained the liquid and tossed the orange peels.  The recipe actually said to remove the bean and continue to steep the peels for another day or two.  Oops.  Had no option other than to plunge ahead so I added a cup of simple syrup to the mix and it's now in the fridge.  (I did take a taste of the mix after removing the bean but it was very harsh.)

I'll take another taste today to see what it's like now that it's finished and chilled.

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