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Dinner 2021


liuzhou
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I made rice yesterday with the intention of making pork bulgogi to go with it but Charlie told me that he and some friends had made plans to go to the Whataburger that opened a few days ago. They figured the lines were down enough now that there would not be too long a wait. Whataburger is Patrick Mahomes favorite hamburger restaurant and an investment group he belongs to is bringing a string of them from here to Wichita and this is the first one. So the rice went in the refrigerator and got turned into fried rice today.   

20211119_153810.jpg

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7 hours ago, liamsaunt said:

Of course, my CSA has been giving me the dreaded kohlrabi every week lately, so the squirrels have been happy too.

 

One of my favorites, actually... Have you tried picking it? It will reduce the natural flavor, and it has some nice texture.

~ Shai N.

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Sushi rice bowl with avocado, tofu (braised with ginger, soy sauce and sugar), edamame, cucumber, eggs, chili, lime juice and zest, some cashew and sesame, basil and mint.

 

 

PXL_20211112_125624296.jpeg

Edited by shain (log)
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~ Shai N.

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5 minutes ago, heidih said:

Oh Lor' comfort plus - must try. Hazelnut custard as described

 

It worked quite nice, if a bit too mild compared to the sweet and nutty squash.

So maybe next time I'll go with a squash in hazelnut pesto.

And the hazelnut custard can be served on its own - either made sweet, or kept savory. The latter option can be nice topped with some sage butter, or maybe roasted squash cubes and parmesan.

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~ Shai N.

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18 minutes ago, shain said:

 

It worked quite nice, if a bit too mild compared to the sweet and nutty squash.

So maybe next time I'll go with a squash in hazelnut pesto.

And the hazelnut custard can be served on its own - either made sweet, or kept savory. The latter option can be nice topped with some sage butter, or maybe roasted squash cubes and parmesan.

Thought blue cheese pulled the flavor up. Anyway an idea I will try - thanks

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1 hour ago, shain said:

 

One of my favorites, actually... Have you tried picking it? It will reduce the natural flavor, and it has some nice texture.

 

The one year I grew kohlrabi I tried picking it but that didn't seem to help.

 

[sorry]

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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Sobeys had fresh liver in the weekly flyer. I had to drive across town to get some. The liver was sliced thick, and had just the right amount for the two of us.
Lived breaded with cracker crumbs and pan fried. Took the liver out and kept it warm in the oven. Stir-fried sliced onions in the same pan. Eaten with gravy, bok choy and sweet tater.

 

                                                                                    529619160_LiverOnion5785.jpg.deb7217f6509e059e2a8934c28a42bd6.jpg

 

                                                                                    

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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58 minutes ago, Dejah said:

Sobeys had fresh liver in the weekly flyer. I had to drive across town to get some. The liver was sliced thick, and had just the right amount for the two of us.
Lived breaded with cracker crumbs and pan fried. Took the liver out and kept it warm in the oven. Stir-fried sliced onions in the same pan. Eaten with gravy, bok choy and sweet tater.

 

                                                                                    


What kind of liver? Which animal?

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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7 minutes ago, liuzhou said:


What kind of liver? Which animal?

I don’t mean to butt in and I hope @Dejah answers you. But speaking as a Canadian I have to say that I have never seen anything other than beef/calves liver or chicken livers for sale in our supermarkets. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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4 hours ago, Anna N said:

I don’t mean to butt in and I hope @Dejah answers you. But speaking as a Canadian I have to say that I have never seen anything other than beef/calves liver or chicken livers for sale in our supermarkets. 

 

That was my understanding. Just checking.

 

My mother never bought anything but lamb's liver (calves' liver was far too expensive) when I was a kid - and she made liver and onions regularly.

I was very surprised when I moved to China and ate lunch one day in a small three table restaurant near work. I found 'liver and onions' on their menu. Of course, I ordered it. It was absolutely delicious and only slightly different from my mother's despite the Chinese influences. I asked and found it was pig's liver.

Now I regularly and happily eat pig's liver - it and chicken being the only ones I can get. No cows or sheep round these parts. Oh. I do get anonymous fish livers, too.

 

This picture was taken years ago in that very restaurant on a return visit (one of many - it became my work canteen!) 

 

1530201551_liverandonions.thumb.jpg.7b5173c6a223318b90579428fd8e06c1.jpg

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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7 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I was very surprised when I moved to China and ate lunch one day in a small three table restaurant near work. I found 'liver and onions' on their menu. Of course, I ordered it. It was absolutely delicious and only slightly different from my mother's despite the Chinese influences. I asked and found it was pig's liver.

In the good old days when a visit to a restaurant didn’t seem as risky as a visit to Chernobyl, if liver was on the menu I would order it. The only time I might hesitate was if lamb was on the same menu. I don’t think that ever happened!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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19 hours ago, Honkman said:

Why dreaded - it’s a great and versatile vegetable - good raw in salat, cooked in stews/soups, in stir-fries etc

 

I have tried it all of those ways, and still dislike it, unfortunately.

 

15 hours ago, shain said:

 

One of my favorites, actually... Have you tried picking it? It will reduce the natural flavor, and it has some nice texture.

 

 I have.  Unfortunately, I still did not like it.  I enjoy every other vegetable that I can think of, but kohlrabi is just unappealing to me.

 

Sadly, they doubled in this week's CSA delivery!

 

IMG_9478.thumb.jpg.0d8839c960f8da9c537691684179879c.jpg

 

I chopped them up and tossed them into the woods on the edge of my yard for the squirrels.  I saw six deer over there shortly after, so maybe deer like kohlrabi.  They can have them 🙃

 

I made vegetable soup for last night's supper.  I made a stock from some parmesan rinds I had in the freezer, which gave it a lot of flavor.  I also used some kale, carrots, and collard greens from the CSA, lots of garlic, onions, a jar of passata, and some pasta, with romano cheese to garnish.

 

soup.thumb.jpg.7b6e6a20e5f4438a5998fe71c9b6bcf5.jpg

 

 

Later that night I was reading a chapter in Stanley Tucci's new memoir Taste.  He gave a recipe for parmesan stock: 1.5 lb. rind, 1 quart water, 3 bay leaves, 7 ounces coarse salt.  That seems like a ton of salt!  I was reading the e-version from the library, but have a hard copy too, so double checked it to be sure the recipe was printed correctly.  Yup, that is the recipe.  I will take his word for it.  

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9 minutes ago, liamsaunt said:

Sadly, they doubled in this week's CSA delivery

I would give my eyeteeth to have those. Sadly I haven't seen any here for about 10 years. I tried growing them a couple times but the insects here like them as well as I do and they ate them faster than I could get to them.

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8 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

That was my understanding. Just checking.

 

My mother never bought anything but lamb's liver (calves' liver was far too expensive) when I was a kid - and she made liver and onions regularly.

I was very surprised when I moved to China and ate lunch one day in a small three table restaurant near work. I found 'liver and onions' on their menu. Of course, I ordered it. It was absolutely delicious and only slightly different from my mother's despite the Chinese influences. I asked and found it was pig's liver.

Now I regularly and happily eat pig's liver - it and chicken being the only ones I can get. No cows or sheep round these parts. Oh. I do get anonymous fish livers, too.

 

This picture was taken years ago in that very restaurant on a return visit (one of many - it became my work canteen!) 

 

1530201551_liverandonions.thumb.jpg.7b5173c6a223318b90579428fd8e06c1.jpg

 

My mother fed us pork liver. It was the cheapest liver available so that is what she bought. I hated it. She was deathly afraid of trichinosis so she fried it until it was suitable for resoling shoes. We cut it with steak knives.

 

I have since learned that well prepared liver makes for an excellent meal.

 

My favorite liver is rabbit liver. I used to grow rabbits for meat. An 8 week old rabbit has a very large liver. Much larger than that of a chicken. Two of them are a substantial meal for one person.

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3 minutes ago, Wait. Wot said:

she fried it until it was suitable for resoling shoes.

My ex-mother-in-law was at the same school of thought plus she was just a lousy cook. Her own sister told her that she wished she had enough of it to pave the road in front of her house. Then they would never have another pothole issue.

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Continuing to tempt Moe with things I know that he likes. Comfort food.
130310851_MinceandTattiesNovember19th20211.thumb.jpg.63a57d0e03c713687b21779b6147aa8c.jpg
Last night I made Mince and Tatties, and extra meat and potatoes for shepherd's pie. I use the same recipe for both.
I like mince and tatties, because it is quicker. Especially on a work night.
1554147240_ShepherdsPiereadyfortheovenNovember19th2021.thumb.jpg.a0484d629d1c780a703908a770b3a0f5.jpg
I had enough meat and mashed potatoes left to make two shepherd's pie for the freezer.
1228243927_ShepherdsPieoutoftheovenNovember19th20211.thumb.jpg.3c0066db7b419e8a387454047c9d2a74.jpg
Baked last night and then vacuumed packaged this morning. 
Edited by Ann_T (log)
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