Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Vintage Cooking Booklets and Pamphlets


Recommended Posts

On 11/7/2020 at 8:48 AM, liuzhou said:

Possibly/probably history's biggest selling cookbook with over 40 million copies distributed. From the promoters of the newly invented self raising/rising flour. Now in its 41st edition, this one is from the 1950s and my mother still has and uses it.

Memories are made of this! The one I remember most of the pages stuck together because of drips on them. I’m sure if you threw it into a pot and added water you’d be able to make soup.  Thank you so much for sharing. 
 

Edited to add:

 

And here it is – – The Be-Ro Cookbook.

Edited by Anna N (log)
  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/9/2020 at 10:18 AM, weinoo said:

 

"Imagine there's no heaven..."  It's easy if you try...

 

2014675231_HowWeEat1.thumb.jpeg.f25bee0a1525038dedd232f67fb7d7af.jpeg

 

1494799064_HowWeEat2.thumb.jpeg.c0ee9057af6a36e019bde1611181b486.jpeg

 

1225002350_HowWeEat3.thumb.jpeg.bf781465553744de364e67c09c5247af.jpeg

 

232210006_HowWeEat4.thumb.jpeg.35cebba7366b928bdcfdb2ff2117c19c.jpeg

 

I really enjoy reading this kind of thing.  Some of it is funny, but some of it is unexpectedly wise: What she writes about a servantless household having informal meals for guests and the hostess not apologizing for things is spot on.  And, being a stickler for table manners (my mantra is WWMMD? - What Would Miss Manners Do?), I agree completely with the importance of teaching children proper manners.  

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a Frigidaire brochure that my Grandmother Ross saved.  Typical of the color illustrations of the times, 1950's, the 8 page brochure is full of tips and smiling faces.  But I remember it hooked up to the kitchen faucet and she always had to wrangle with the thing.  Very touching though as I found this note inserted into the brochure for the Frigidaire refrigerator she bought in 1957, probably at the same time she bought the dishwasher.  

"Frigidaire Refrigerator"

  -CP123157

  -Date purchased, 2/19/57

  -Paid in full-$495 (a tidy sum of money back then)

Vintage Frigidaire Brochure.jpeg

 

Vintage Frigidaire note from Grandmother Ross.jpeg

 

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

The "After All it Take a Baker" from the Swift & Company.  It probably dates to the late 1940's.  Swift was one of America's largest producers of products like hams, bacons, and many, many more.  That also included a big trade in lard and shortening.  I think my Mother must have gotten his booklet when she started working there after the war.  It's pretty tattered so maybe it had been in the office for some time.  She was the secretary to the plant manager in Portland.  Swift and Company was located in North Portland next to the large livestock yards.  She met my Father there.  He worked as a livestock buyer for Swift and travelled throughout Oregon buying sheep, hogs and beef cattle.  What's interesting is the depth of science they went to back then in developing these products and then sharing that with consumers. 

 

There are recipes for the home, but also for cooks and bakers in bakeries or large institutions. For example, this is a description for using a Dutch Cookie Machine to make "thin embossed wafers"

Soft Flour-200lbs.

Vream (shortening)-50 lbs.

Sugar-80 lbs.

Honey-12 lbs.

Swift's Brookefiled Eggs-16

Salt-1 lb.

"Powdered Ammonia"-6 oz.

Soday-10 oz.

Vanilla flavor

Water to make medium dough

 

Swift and Co. #1.jpeg

 

Swift and Co. #2.jpeg'

 

Swift and Co. #3.jpeg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

La Vache Qui Rit (Laughing Cow) recipe pocket (sort of) booklet. Not vintage but fun 'slice' design and illustrations.  Hits the nostalgia bone since we grew up on it.  En francais, sorry.  'Smoothie a la tomate' anyone? Haha

 

20201110_100802.thumb.jpg.003b3fd2c71e01f165e6a7cfb3a1e93e.jpg

 

20201113_104150.thumb.jpg.cb386fbc1fb4028883a8adacbab19880.jpg

 

20201110_111321.thumb.jpg.7aca5b5303820a5ec7a6be6612762508.jpg

 

SmoothTom.thumb.jpg.81347ce7e5d64cf231c8a2036dec477a.jpg

  • Like 6

That wasn't chicken

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Note the section "Water Content of dough."  Not dissimilar to what we read today!

I noticed that and was really intrigued.  This book is 125 pages, small and spiral-bound.  I've got homework.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Still can't find my good stash but these 2 were in my mom's Betty Crocker cookbook. Huge binder - thus the punch holes.

The caramel one cross promotes other products like parkay margarine. The tag line "So pure, so good, so wholesome!" - no date. The hamburger one (1958), as David noted with the bakery booklet, has some"modern" items like cracked wheat. Mom worked in accounting for PacBell so this must have been reprinted for the ladies. 

IMG_1473.JPG

IMG_1475.JPG

IMG_1474.JPG

IMG_1476.JPG

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Another one from the Culinary Arts Institute:

IMG_3998.thumb.jpg.b72dd2d71a2d574603cdaa300001f606.jpg

 

IMG_4001.jpg.8bd73b119aa3fb110af3b1ca1f890d31.jpg

Does anyone know how publications like this were distributed.  I mean, unlike the company/appliance-tied booklets, these don't seem to be tie-ins.  Where they available at checkout counters?  Book stores?  Newsstands? 

 

Here's one from Pet Milk:

IMG_4003.thumb.jpg.def4c26419c5463bec6bd17a5cbd3865.jpg

 

I love the back cover:

IMG_4004.thumb.jpg.78d7b569a7d1a9e9c11837a93769cfef.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Edison ones showed up. They were classes and mom and friends enjoyed the demo, hands on, and tasting. Mostly ignored the contrived  "electric" aspect. We had gas oven and range.  The beef fondue was a nightmare. They bought nice fondue pots (open electric skillet and all that oil -nope!) I still have hers though the smell of Sterno makes me zip out of events where chafing dishes use it to get air. But though dipping sauces tasty the endless waiting for meat to be done - boring. We transitioned to cheese fondue - Velveeta amped up with a bit of stronger cheese. The salad was quite good - a meal. really..

 

IMG_1490.JPG

IMG_1489.JPG

IMG_1491.JPG

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have hundreds that were collected by my Grandmother Brown during her almost 92 years.

  • Like 4

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

Another one from the Culinary Arts Institute:

IMG_3998.thumb.jpg.b72dd2d71a2d574603cdaa300001f606.jpg

 

IMG_4001.jpg.8bd73b119aa3fb110af3b1ca1f890d31.jpg

Does anyone know how publications like this were distributed.  I mean, unlike the company/appliance-tied booklets, these don't seem to be tie-ins.  Where they available at checkout counters?  Book stores?  Newsstands? 

 

Here's one from Pet Milk:

IMG_4003.thumb.jpg.def4c26419c5463bec6bd17a5cbd3865.jpg

 

I love the back cover:

IMG_4004.thumb.jpg.78d7b569a7d1a9e9c11837a93769cfef.jpg

I have some of these too.  From what I've been able to read from my collection, if the sponsor was like PET Milk, and you listened in to the radio program they might announce, "send us a self-addressed stamped envelope to xxx and we'll mail you this new PET Milk baking booklet." Or something like that.  

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Again, no date, but looking at the photos and the color printing, this one is probably from the early 1960s.  It's a Holiday collection of the best recipes from the Pillsbury Bake-Off.  At first glance you think the recipes are pretty silly, but a closer look and I think with just a few modifications, these would be delicious today.  And they had some good copywriters back then coming up with catchy names like "Merry Mincemeaters" and "Cranberry Crisscross Coffee Cake."

Vintage Cooking Booklets 1.jpeg

 

Vintage Cooking Booklets 2.jpeg

 

 

Vintage Cooking Booklets 3.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, David Ross said:

Again, no date, but looking at the photos and the color printing, this one is probably from the early 1960s.  It's a Holiday collection of the best recipes from the Pillsbury Bake-Off.  At first glance you think the recipes are pretty silly, but a closer look and I think with just a few modifications, these would be delicious today.  And they had some good copywriters back then coming up with catchy names like "Merry Mincemeaters" and "Cranberry Crisscross Coffee Cake."

Vintage Cooking Booklets 1.jpeg

 

 

Yews! I loved taking that one out around the Holidays for inspiration. It has disappeared...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, heidih said:

Yews! I loved taking that one out around the Holidays for inspiration. It has disappeared...

If you look you can see my yellow sticky notes on certain recipes.  I'm constantly putting notes in these booklets for recipes to try.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

You all made me look on the back of my bookshelf. I have more I can share, but this one, from 1942 jumped out first. Some are from my mom, some I picked up along the way. I find them all fascinating.

 

IMG_1545.jpeg

IMG_1547.jpeg

IMG_1546.jpeg

ETA: Those creatures looked more like crazy cats than bunnies to me, but the intro says, "an attractive garnish is pear halves, notched at the small end to make bunny ears and stuck with cloves to make their cunning faces." 

Edited by hsm (log)
  • Like 1
  • Haha 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

OMG - those "bunnies"!  Hilarious.  I think that food styling has advanced so much in the last 50 years!

 

First thing i had my kid make while he was in a "gain independence and confidence" phase. Bunny salad from Betty Crocker Boy's and Girl's Cookbook but the pear halves were cut side down. Pretty adorable.  https://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/rabbit-out-of-the-hat-salad/6c66506a-8beb-4715-b903-15d23ecd3edd

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, heidih said:

First thing i had my kid make while he was in a "gain independence and confidence" phase. Bunny salad from Betty Crocker Boy's and Girl's Cookbook but the pear halves were cut side down. Pretty adorable.  https://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/rabbit-out-of-the-hat-salad/6c66506a-8beb-4715-b903-15d23ecd3edd

Much cuter.  And they actually resemble bunnies!  😁

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/24/2020 at 4:20 PM, hsm said:

You all made me look on the back of my bookshelf. I have more I can share, but this one, from 1942 jumped out first. Some are from my mom, some I picked up along the way. I find them all fascinating.

 

IMG_1545.jpeg

IMG_1547.jpeg

IMG_1546.jpeg

ETA: Those creatures looked more like crazy cats than bunnies to me, but the intro says, "an attractive garnish is pear halves, notched at the small end to make bunny ears and stuck with cloves to make their cunning faces." 

I love the color illustrations.  Imagine a staff artist painting that image of Mother bringing out a hot roast.  And the copywriter who wrote, "Their Generous Proportions Please the Man."

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This one is unique.  I'm not sure where I came upon this one, I think maybe an ex-girlfriend who kept a space at a local vintage shop.  She was always on the lookout for these vintage cooking booklets for me.  This is from 1952 in recognition of the 20th anniversary of the "One Man's Family" Radio Show, the "Mother Barbour's Favorite Recipes." Reading through the pages it was a very different time, and recipes, but a fun look back at family life in those days.  The booklet was sponsored by Miles Laboratories of Elkhart, Indiana.  Check out the company history.  Pretty interesting.  

One Mans Family #1.jpeg

One Mans Family #2.jpegOne Mans Family #3.jpegOne Mans Family #4.jpegOne Mans Family #5.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

That is cool. Thoughtful girlfriend. Today the Bayer association is poison but so many of these advert booklets are from huge companies that had the advertising budgets. No focus groups then I think. They had no idea how it would play out and influence our cuisine.  The gender thing is simply typical of the era. I almost think it gave permission to housewives to be bolder in their cooking ;) (not your momma's food)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, David Ross said:

This one is unique.  I'm not sure where I came upon this one, I think maybe an ex-girlfriend who kept a space at a local vintage shop.  She was always on the lookout for these vintage cooking booklets for me. 

 

This is great - I note the recipe for halibut says to cook for 45 minutes in a moderate oven, "until fish is tender." My guess is that fish is waaaayyy more than tender!

  • Haha 4

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By OliverB
      I just received a copy of "The Cook's Book - Concise Edition" edited by Jill Norman, and now I'm curious, what's the difference to the full edition? Supposedly it has 648 pages compared to 496 in this edition, and it appears to be much larger in size if the info on us.dk.com is correct. Other than that I can't find any info what the difference might be. It's a neat book with lots of photos about techniques etc, and lots of recipes. As with any DK book production values are high.
      If the contents are the same, I'm happy with the smaller version, but I'd really like to know what I might be missing on those 150 or so pages. If it's just filler, I don't care. If it's some fantastic recipes, I do care....
      Anybody here know both editions? Google was so far of no help. Lots of the full edition are to be had used as well, I'd be happy giving this one as a gift and ordering the full edition, if it's worth it.
      Thanks!
      Oliver
    • By devlin
      Say you were rounded up with a group of folks and either had a skill to offer in exchange for a comfy room and some other niceties or were sent off to a slag heap to toil away in the hot sun every day for 16 hours, what 3 books would you want to take with you to enable you to cook and bake such fabulous foodstuffs that your kidnappers would keep you over some poor schlub who could cook only beans and rice and the occasional dry biscuit?
    • By mixmaster b
      I am interested in getting some cookbooks that cover the basics of pastry and baking--not bread, necessarily, but dessert, cakes, cookies, etc. I searched a few other cookbook threads but did not have luck on finding books on pastry.
      My interest is in fairly classic French and European style baking, and I need a book that covers technique. Pictures would also be much appreciated--I like both the step by step pix or great pictures of the end product.
      Right now, I have Desserts and Chocolate Desserts by Pierre Herme. (I love these and have had good results from the recipes, but feel I should start with a more classic approach.) La Varenne Pratique has provided some good starting points, but I would like to find a book with more focus on baking.
      I was thinking about the Payard book. Any comments? Suggestions would be much appreciated! In case it applies, I am a home cook and am slightly more skilled than a total beginner.
      Thanks!
    • By liuzhou
      Congratulations are due to Fuchsia Dunlop, whose "Food of Sichuan" has just been published in a Chinese language version - a rare honour here. I've ordered a couple of copies as gifts for local friends who loved the Engish version, but struggled with some language issues.
       

      《川菜》,
      中信出版社。
       
       
    • By Brooke Dojny
      Fried Clams (From the New England Clamshack Cookbook)
      Serves 4 as Appetizer.
      Reprinted with permission from The New England Clamshack Cookbook by Brooke Dojny, 2003

      Vegetable Oil or solid white shortening for frying, such as Crisco
      2-1/2 pt shucked, medium-sized whole-belly soft-shell clams
      1-1/2 c evaporated milk
      1-1/2 c yellow corn flour
      3/4 c pastry flour, cake flour or all-purpose flour
      tartar sauce
      lemon wedges

      1. Heat the oil or shortening over medium heat in a deep fryer or heavy, deep pot until it reaches 350 degrees F.
      2. Rinse the clams gently if they are muddy, and dry on paper towels.
      3. Pour the evaporated milk into a large bowl. In another large bowl, stir together the corn flour and pastry flour.
      4. Using your hands, drip about one third of the clams into the milk, letting the excess liquid drain off. Dredge the clams in the flour mixture, using your hands to make sure each clam is evenly coated. Transfer to a colander or large strainer and shake gently to remove the excess flour.
      5. Slide the clams into the hot fat and deep-fry until golden brown, 2 to 4 minutes, depending on the size of the clams. (Cooked clams can be kept warm in a slow oven while you finish the remaining frying.)
      6. Serve with tartar sauce and lemon wedges.
      Keywords: Seafood, Appetizer, American
      ( RG468 )
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...