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weinoo

Magnetic Knife Strip, Be It Wooden, Stainless, Whatever

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I'm thinking of putting up a magnetic knife strip or two - perhaps attaching it (them) to a side of a cabinet, or to the divider between my range and refrigerator, that would otherwise be unused.

Or maybe even to an area of backsplash tile; the decision is yet to be made.

 

So who has experience with these; attaching them through the front or with concealed screws in the back, wooden or metal, etc. etc.  What do you and don't you like about them? And, do they remain stable once installed (provided they're installed properly)?

 

Here are a couple of examples of what I'm thinking of:

 

5a031a5aed644_doublekniferacks.jpg.8bcbabfd97ff56f59fdd273a8ec12793.jpg 

5a031a81aafdc_KnifestripMOCWoodworkscustom.jpg.92fab642d101e4177f224c99d083d350.jpg

5a031a7ac462c_Kinfestriponsidepanel.jpg.8dd345b84fd794808022d65bd5201d3f.jpg

  5a031a8862865_Knifestripontile.thumb.jpg.d28899ea198566dd85f5d9ecbe7accab.jpg

 

There's some nice stuff being made out there.  

 

The Puukko knife rack, by Uusi - I like the way it's constructed.

 

M.O.C. Woodworks makes them in many types of wood, as well as custom sized.

 

Wake the Tree Furniture Company makes an interesting design.

 

Mag-Blok, from Bench Crafted, installs from the front, very nicely it looks as if.

 

Any thoughts are appreciated.

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I've got a basic cheap one, mostly metal with a bit of plastic. It's just attached with screws through the front into heavy-duty drywall anchors. I didn't use the anchors that came with the kit, I bought a stronger variety because I figured I'd be giving mine more use than the cheap ones are typically designed for. It wasn't long enough to attach to the studs. I'm a big fan of this kind of knife storage. I've heard of people winding up with their knives magnetized, but I'm not sure I'd even notice such a thing, so I guess I don't care.

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I like the Puukko rack.  The wood grain is lovely.

I don't have a knife rack but a friend does and while cooking in her kitchen I found the access to them convenient. 

I have all my knives in a shallow drawer in front of my main preparation area.  I would be nice not to have to open the drawer each time I want a knife.  Sometimes I have to move someone who is standing in the way of the drawer or when the knives are being dried someone has to move me who is standing in front of the drawer.  

So a rack would be great if you have space.

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I've used a mag. knife block for about 12 years now and I love it.  I just got a cheap one at the rest. supply store on Bowery and Houston.  It doesn't look that great - but that doesn't bother me since my kitchen is very utilitarian, so it somehow fits - plus, it's covered by knives so you can barely see it.  I've never had a problem with it "losing a knife" or scratching one - but I make sure I don't slide the knife off when I'm going to get one.  Also, make sure you dry the knife thoroughly before putting back - I have heard of some people complain of rust developing between the knife and magnet since air can't get to the stuck side of the knife once it's adhered.

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2 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

 I've heard of people winding up with their knives magnetized, but I'm not sure I'd even notice such a thing, so I guess I don't care.

I wonder how people could tell that their knives were magnetized... most food is non-ferrous... hehe...

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Ive used Magnabars for ever.

 

they work fine

 

recently i got a pair of Watanabe knives

 

I thought very hard about putting them up on the Magnabar

 

but i thought i would be very careful taking them down so the blade was not damaged by the exposed metal.

 

I got two very small blemishes on the blade , easily repaired w the EdgePro   1000 grit /  2300 polishing stone  ( not tape )

 

this was recommended to my by EdgePro.    I took y time.

 

I then ordered a Magnabar knock off from amazon and plan to grind out a passage in the metal-wood  

 

sort of a trough

 

so the cutting edge of the blades of these knifes never touch anything   say 1 "

 

when the are put on the racks and taken down.

 

I just a haven't gotten to it.

 

this was never a problem w any of the western knives

 

I can't say what would happen w the westernized Japanese knives  

 

as seen  ( shun ? ) in one of your choices

 

just keep that in mine even if the blades openly touch wood , not meal

 

the issue is how the knives  ' roll off '  the strip.

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

I've got a basic cheap one, mostly metal with a bit of plastic. It's just attached with screws through the front into heavy-duty drywall anchors. I didn't use the anchors that came with the kit, I bought a stronger variety because I figured I'd be giving mine more use than the cheap ones are typically designed for. It wasn't long enough to attach to the studs. I'm a big fan of this kind of knife storage. I've heard of people winding up with their knives magnetized, but I'm not sure I'd even notice such a thing, so I guess I don't care.

 

Yeah, I think this would work well if I decide to attach it to the tiles, which are attached onto drywall.

 

My worry is attaching it to a 3/4 inch, potentially MDF divider.  I suppose if I get that divider made out of solid wood, it won't be a problem.

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With MDF I'd use a metal threaded insert to increase the thread grip area. If you can install the insert with the flange on the back side of the divider you'll have a very, very high strength connection.

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27 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

With MDF I'd use a metal threaded insert to increase the thread grip area. If you can install the insert with the flange on the back side of the divider you'll have a very, very high strength connection.

Can you possibly show me (like with a picture) what you mean by the flange on back side of divider?

 

I'm fully useless when it comes to this stuff.

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I have two tucked away in storage, awaiting a) my next move, into a place with a kitchen that could accommodate one reasonably, and b) the absence of too-smart toddlers who are sneaky with chairs and step-stools, and have an insatiable curiosity about Papa's sharp and shiny kitchen things. 

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3 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Can you possibly show me (like with a picture) what you mean by the flange on back side of divider?

Sure -- the product I'm talking about is this sort of thing:

E-Z Lok Threaded Insert, Zinc, Hex-Flanged, 3/8"-16 Internal Threads, 25mm Length (Pack of 25)

 

They come in two styles, flanged and unflanged. The flanged ones look like this:

710MmeAFUsL._SL1500_.jpg

If you install that so that that flange (the lip around the outside that prevents it from sinking down too deep) is actually on the back of your MDF, rather than the front, then you'll be pulling it tighter when you tighten down the screws for your knife strip. Here's a side view:

Artboard 1@2x.png

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for a 12 " knife rack 

 

you might not need anything more than a standard plastic insert you can get at HomeDepot

 

the weight of the knives  pull down

 

not out

 

that a 9o degree diff

 

the items above are really fantastic.

 

but possibly far more than you need.

 

that being said

 

you can do as I did with these :

 

https://www.homedepot.com/s/plastic%20screw%20wall%20incerts?NCNI-5

 

however

 

if your EdgePro'd knives fall off the wal

 

a NYC wall after all ,

 

Don't Call Me.

 

 

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@rotuts - It's probably going to be an 18" strip or two, so I really want to make sure it doesn't ever get loose; those E-Z Lock inserts look like just the thing!

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then go for it

 

but if you can't do that

 

the other items from HD will work fine

 

but go for being comfortable !

 

I really do like these :

 

https://www.benchcrafted.com/Magblok.html

 

a billion years ago

 

when i still did woodworking

 

I had some very fine NE BirdsEye Maple

 

and when LeeValley was still in Canada

 

they offered  Rare Earth Magnets

 

of various sizes

 

and those would be inserted in the wood in question

 

Down in the Home Work-Shop

 

then plugged w BEM

 

finished of course

 

but I never got to it

 

Om wondering if

 

the link I mentioned has used this technique ?

 

 

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For the record it's not the weight of the knives I was worried about, it was the constant pulling them on and off, which is a direct tension force applied to those screws. Also, I tend to overengineer things :) .

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14 minutes ago, Chris Hennes said:

For the record it's not the weight of the knives I was worried about, it was the constant pulling them on and off, which is a direct tension force applied to those screws. Also, I tend to overengineer things :) .

Exactly what I am thinking - every single pull on a knife would worry me.

 

In this case (as opposed to pizza dough :B ) I am all for over-engineering.  

 

Also, I'm looking to drive my contractor a little crazy, as he's doing to me!

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My take is if you're going to use a magnetic strip, get one with the rare earth magnets mounted behind wood--safer for your knives.

 

I have strips in one kitchen and a drawer "rack" in another.  I prefer the former for ease of access, but the latter for cleanliness--dust, grease and spatter aren't an issue with drawer storage.

 

Two other thoughts:  (1)  A vertical strip (i.e., horizontal knives) can be a good option See, Photo 1 in the following link: https://www.npr.org/2011/02/23/134005310/national-museum-of-american-history-julia-childs-copper-pots-come-home

(2)  If you go with horizontal strips, plan both the location and edge orientation so that no one needs to reach across (or pull back against) the exposed edges.

 

Good Luck!

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6 hours ago, weinoo said:

Exactly what I am thinking - every single pull on a knife would worry me.

 

 

 In my northern ren faire kitchen I have two 12" mag strips attached to MDF with simple wood screws. Knives are put up and taken down all through the 6 hours it takes to prep, cook and serve the feast. Still holding solidly after many seasons of use. Just my 2 cents ...

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I've had a few different ones and like the Mag Bloks a lot.  The blade on wood contact feels more gentle than blade on stainless.   You'll quickly get the hang of putting the spine perpendicular to the rack then "rolling" the blade face onto the rack and removing the knife in reverse.

 

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On 11/8/2017 at 10:07 AM, Chris Hennes said:

. . .  I've heard of people winding up with their knives magnetized, but I'm not sure I'd even notice such a thing, so I guess I don't care.

 

On 11/8/2017 at 10:10 AM, KennethT said:

I wonder how people could tell that their knives were magnetized... most food is non-ferrous... hehe...

 

For the record, yes, knives can become magnetized. The two pictured here spent eight or so years on a magnetic strip, but for the last ten have lived elsewhere:

 

 

Maybe -- probably -- it's no big deal. Still it's a little disturbing -- and just maybe, under certain circumstances, dangerous -- to have knives move seemingly of their own volition.

 

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Rare earth magnets are so strong, you can hang the knives by their tips.

Nothing touches the body of the blades, and no wood strips to get germy and dirty.

Germy and dirty? Yes, I have a few knives that I don't clean after every use. They are for dirty cutting.

 

dcarch

 

5a04c765735a9_knifesharpen3.thumb.jpg.e0ccd5fbe96d848225ab96049c115785.jpg


Edited by dcarch (log)
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This place has very old drywall with a thin coating of plaster on it—for some strange reason they often applied the plaster coat when drywall was a new thing.

I used toggle screws.

No way will the knife strips budge!!!!

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7 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

I stopped using toggle bolts many years ago. Yes, they really hold, but if you need to temporarily remove whatever has been mounted, say for painting, the toggle is lost and has to be replaced.

 

I use drywall anchors (see picture below) but I probably wouldn't use them in your plaster walls. Instead of a toggle that flattens against the inner wall, the "tang" area spreads out to form the inner wall load bearing surface. Because it has a built-in washer on outside surface of the anchor it remains firmly in place if you have to remove whatever you have mounted.

 

 

Drywall Anchor.jpg

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