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How do they do that? (the bonbon thread)


kevnick80
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Just reading this over a month later -  regarding the tape.

I bought some some cheap, narrow tape at a Michaels craft store, and some that I found at Wallyworld. Both worked fine.   Using the rubber-tipped gum stimulator (dental tool), I found it remarkably easy to press the tape smoothly into the molds and get the sides to stick in there nicely.  I tried it in the dome mold, and then did the yellow cars with black racing stripes.  

 

Its a little time consuming, yes. But, that dental tool works really really well.   HTH.

\

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-Andrea

 

A 'balanced diet' means chocolate in BOTH hands. :biggrin:

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/4/2020 at 11:30 PM, Jim D. said:

 

It would be interesting to know the results of your attempts. And photos (if they are presentable--most of mine were not).

 

sorry for the late reply, I will definitely take photos next time. I am just overwhelmed with orders at the moment :)

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Hello everyone. I read this whole thread and just wanted to say thank you for sharing your knowledge and experiences. Some weeks ago I found a rather interesting looking bonbon and wanted to know if I'm on the right track how he made it. 

I thought pastry tip for small ring, and then a something with a small tip for the lines. What's been bugging me is how he got the shading and different colors on the lines. So maybe scrape and airbrush? 

Screenshot_20200129-110156.png

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IMHO he's literally made one mold of that, and that's the only one that he can display. If I had the skill level to do that, I'd spray one cavity black at a time, then leave it to just set up enough to start drawing the lines, once that's done, careful airbrushing. Then move to the next cavity. There's no way I'd be able to do it though, I haven't got the time or patience 🤣

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Honestly, I wonder if even that one bon bon is real. Much easier to create it in Photoshop. If he did paint a chocolate like that, wow, what a steady hand and a tremendous amount of artistry and patience.

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9 hours ago, curls said:

Honestly, I wonder if even that one bon bon is real. Much easier to create it in Photoshop. If he did paint a chocolate like that, wow, what a steady hand and a tremendous amount of artistry and patience.

His Instagram is rather strange 

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On 1/29/2020 at 4:10 AM, Hendrix said:

Hello everyone. I read this whole thread and just wanted to say thank you for sharing your knowledge and experiences. Some weeks ago I found a rather interesting looking bonbon and wanted to know if I'm on the right track how he made it. 

I thought pastry tip for small ring, and then a something with a small tip for the lines. What's been bugging me is how he got the shading and different colors on the lines. So maybe scrape and airbrush? 

Screenshot_20200129-110156.png

I'm pretty sure that's not a bonbon. The reflection of his thumb on the surface is all wrong. The reflective nature of even the shiniest chocolate surfaces shouldn't have the reflection that deep.

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Or simply just Photoshop. Most of his stuff looks a bit overly polished. If he pulled it off though, kudos to him. But also getting the color shift inside of the lines is something that boggles my mind and wouldn't want to do. 

 

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On 1/29/2020 at 11:10 AM, Hendrix said:

Screenshot_20200129-110156.png

 

 

LESSON 1
When you want to troll chocolatiers all over the world, you just need to photoshop a super advanced bonbon so people will start talking about it.

 

LESSON 2

If you want to create a peculiar effect on a bonbon and don't know how to do that, then just photoshop it. People all over the world will start wondering how you did it, someone will come out with the solution and doing the job for you.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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34 minutes ago, teonzo said:

 

 

LESSON 1
When you want to troll chocolatiers all over the world, you just need to photoshop a super advanced bonbon so people will start talking about it.

 

LESSON 2

If you want to create a peculiar effect on a bonbon and don't know how to do that, then just photoshop it. People all over the world will start wondering how you did it, someone will come out with the solution and doing the job for you.

 

 

 

Teo

 

🎤drop 😎

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2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

You know - with the printer I saw at SIGEP, thermoformed onto a sphere, backed with black - wonder if you could do something like this?

You mean to create something like a transfer sheet? That's also been on my mind but had no idea how you could do it with a round bonbon.

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2 hours ago, Hendrix said:

You mean to create something like a transfer sheet? That's also been on my mind but had no idea how you could do it with a round bonbon.

These were transfer sheets supposedly printed on a cocoa butter layer (but when I looked at the ingredients on the ones I brought home - not cocoa butter). The transfer sheet was put on the sheet to be thermoformed - allowing any sort of shape to have the pattern on the inside.

IMG_0110.jpg.adbb429e19c9392329dc59e8df2641e1.jpg

 

IMG_0108.jpg.dda8b24170bf524377e5e13419dd95e5.jpg

 

IMG_0042.jpg.c8f049f792efc49a586b6fce23817b67.jpg

 

 

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3 hours ago, RWood said:

His photos on Instagram are totally photoshopped. He has a really good photographer, and a lot of enhancements. You can tell by the way the light reflects. Each chocolate shows a reflection at the perfect spot and the perfect shape, like these

 

 

I guess the question I have between yours and Teo's posts is: Are his photographs photos of chocolates that have been enhanced to look better, or are they completely fake and not techniques in chocolates at all?

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1 hour ago, keychris said:

 

I guess the question I have between yours and Teo's posts is: Are his photographs photos of chocolates that have been enhanced to look better, or are they completely fake and not techniques in chocolates at all?

 

I tend to lean toward the latter. They look way to perfect and unreal for chocolate work. 

I could be wrong though 🤷‍♀️

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Hi there.  I'm hoping you all would be kind enough to provide some tips and tricks for very very low-volume, molded bon-bons (think 1 tray mold).  I've been making my own 3-ingredient ~73% chocolate (1-2 lbs at a time every few months, just to break off a square after dinner for tasting, instead of cheese).  Never made candy but for a couple experiments in the past (both dipped, with visual results analogous to that of a pre-skooler drawing itself in front of a mountain and sun). This thread is full of amazing results, which eventually I'd like to try, but for now, sticking to something simple.

 

Having watched many videos of the process, the mess and waste give me the frights, and finding an efficient way to keep the tempered chocolate liquid, tempered, and warm while the shells chill in the fridge for a few minutes eludes me.

 

Thanks for any motivation, pep-talk, tips, and tricks.  I'm going to start easy, of course.

drawing.png

Edited by jedovaty (log)
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6 hours ago, jedovaty said:

Having watched many videos of the process, the mess and waste give me the frights


The mess can be prodigious until you figure out your own system to minimize it based on your workspace and equipment. If you're seeing a lot of actual waste in the videos you're watching, you need different videos. There's generally very little excess chocolate in the molding or dipping process that can't be reclaimed in some way. 

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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On 2/5/2020 at 1:20 PM, Tri2Cook said:


The mess can be prodigious until you figure out your own system to minimize it based on your workspace and equipment. If you're seeing a lot of actual waste in the videos you're watching, you need different videos. There's generally very little excess chocolate in the molding or dipping process that can't be reclaimed in some way. 

 

Great, I think I have the workflow and strategy mapped out in my head.  The challenging part is figuring out how to work with such a small batch, keep things tempered, and minimize "leftovers".  Tempering will likely be most difficult, as I have very little experience - I really struggled with it in the beginning with my chocolate bars, and before really getting any experience doing it, silk just made everything so easy.  Perhaps I shoudn't use my own chocolate and practice with the purchased stuff until I figure it out.

 

Also, how do I get salt or other decorations on top of the bon bon mold?  I'm concerned heating up just the top tip will screw up the tempering.  Hmmm.

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8 hours ago, jedovaty said:

Also, how do I get salt or other decorations on top of the bon bon mold?  I'm concerned heating up just the top tip will screw up the tempering.  Hmmm.

 

Replying to myself, what if I heat the salt in the oven? This might bring in enough residual heat and melt/stick to the top.  Of course, this won't work with other decorations, but for now, this'll work.  Or maybe molded bon bons just weren't made for topping decorations?

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21 minutes ago, jedovaty said:

 

Replying to myself, what if I heat the salt in the oven? This might bring in enough residual heat and melt/stick to the top.  Of course, this won't work with other decorations, but for now, this'll work.  Or maybe molded bon bons just weren't made for topping decorations?

How about putting it on while the bonbon is still wet. That works for enrobed bonbons.

 

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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2 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

How about putting it on while the bonbon is still wet. That works for enrobed bonbons.

 

I'm using molds, not dipping, so only the flat bottom is accessible.. can I just put the salt there?  Might make more sense since the tongue is there and would touch the salt first, kind of like the salted side of a pringle crisp :D

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2 hours ago, jedovaty said:

  Or maybe molded bon bons just weren't made for topping decorations?


this

 

but if you really want stuff on top of your bonbon, either put it in the mold first and glue it in place with a dot of chocolate before molding or glue garnish to the finished bonbon with a dot of chocolate. 
 

Or mix up your assortment with a few hand dipped pieces sprinkled while wet. 

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