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Absurdly, stupidly basic pastry & baking questions


Toliver
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it seems well supported that creaming will assist in the 'rise' - a couple good articles cited above . . .

but the question, at least for me,,,, is the point where it is 'necessary' or 'beneficial' to do so.

 

something like above/below baker percent of water/fat/liquid . . .or whatever . . . "creaming is advantageous"

bit of a windmill tilt, methinks, because any serious 'recipe developer' would be testing and testing and . . .

 

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I made a mango pudding the other day that while the taste was fine, the texture wasn't right - too dense.  I want to try it again.  The recipe called for 1 !/2 sheets of gelatin, I used 1/2 tablespoon of powdered gelatin.  The liquid in the recipe consists of 3 T whipping cream and 1/2 cup of mango puree with 1 tablespoon of lime juice at the end.  The recipie directs you to soak the gelatine in ice cold water, and it is squeezed dry and added at the end of the process.  Since I wasn't using sheets, I thought I would soften the gelatin in the cream.  After that had sat for a while, the cream, including the gelatine were heated to a simmer, after which I carried on with the recipe.  Eggs and sugar were whisked together, tempered and the lot heated to 167F.  What did I do wrong?  Should I have treated the gelatin differently?  Does heating it do something bad to it?  Any help is appreciated.

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9 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Anyone?

I'm hoping somebody much smarter than me will help you out but in the meantime, here is David Lebovitz take on gelatin. Click

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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@ElsieD I don't think you did anything wrong, the whipping cream + mango + lime is only 3/4 c, and not a lot of that is water. Either the recipe is just stiffer than you like or your puree has more fiber and less juice than the recipe developer's.

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@ElsieD What type of leaf gelatin did the original call for?  Silver, Gold, etc?  If one of the lower bloom strengths like Silver, then the half Tbsp would be way too much I would think.  

 

But, I think PG is on the right track too.  Blooming in water is preferred most of the time since it is neutral pH and there is nothing to interfere with it such as the fats in the heavy cream, acidity of the heavy cream, etc.

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The recipe doesn't specify.  It simply says 1 1/2 sheets of gelatin.  The book makes no mention anywhere else of the type of gelatin to use.  The book is by Edd Kimber, a British pastry chef, should that make any difference.

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6 hours ago, Pete Fred said:

The gelatin most commonly sold in UK supermarkets is Platinum strength, and is packaged so that four sheets will set one pint of liquid. 👍

I have found a place that sells gelatin sheets that are 200 bloom.  Platinum sheets are 230 bloom.  If I use the 200 bloom ones, am I correct in saying I need 1.15 of a gold sheet for every Platinum sheet?  (230÷200)

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It's a little bit outside of my competence zone, so perhaps somebody else could chip in, but i think you don't have to do the maths; it's already done for you. Gold sheets weigh more than platinum sheets (2g v 1.6g), so the same number of sheets will set the same amount of liquid. Therefore you should be fine with 1½ sheets of gold.

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I was just trying to rub the skins from toasted hazelnuts and was wondering if anyone has ever tried those steel mesh cut proof gloves for the task. Are they abrasive enough to help? 🤔

 

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they probably are, and  then you'd have to clean/shake them to get the skin out of the gloves.  Or maybe not; I'm thinking these look like chainmail and there are spaces where the skins would get caught up in?  Usually I boil the nuts with a little bit of baking soda and then toss them on a towel and rub the skins off.  I admit I have less and  less patience with this method the older I get ;) and then I see the price of blanched hazelnuts and think, eh, it's not so bad!  Actually the price of any nuts these days!

 

Edited to add: this method was suggested in one of RLB's books and has always worked for me.  I toast the nuts after skinning them....

Edited by JeanneCake (log)
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