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Who Doesn't Use a Microwave Oven?


weinoo
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We could use this counter for other things but it is just the right size for the large MW we have. A microwave has sat there since we moved in 30 years ago.

 

Microwave counter..jpg

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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Mine is used primarily to heat some milk in a mug while my Saeco super automatic pounds out a couple shots of RedBird espresso. They take almost identical amounts of time, so I've got a double latte in 60 seconds.

 

Which reminds me...I could use a cup right about now.

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PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

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I use it to reheat things, melt buter, boil water quickly, things like that. Don't use it much but sure would replace it if it breaks. With such infrequent use the "plastic melting into your food' thing is a non issue to me, less healthy to sit 30 min in traffic I'm sure.

 

I do not reheat coffee in it though, I'd rather never drink an other cup than tasting MW reheated coffee ever again, actually makes me gag. As does luke warm coffee for some reason, can't get it down.

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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Very true. At the end of all forms of heating, they all fall into the theory of Kinetic Particle Theory,

 

But back to microwave oven, this form of heating limits the usefulness of microwave ovens to only heating and not browning (no caramelization, except bacon type) unless your microwave incorporates resistance heating. I used to have one, but it was much more expensive. 3 to 4 times more $ and much bigger in size. 

 

dcarch

One can produce heat in a microwave for browning etc by using a "susceptor" such as the special foil-and-cardboard tray under a frozen pizza (yuk) which browns the crust, or the susceptor patch in the bottom of a popcorn bag which melts the "butter."  I use a small piece of wet-or-dry silicon carbide sandpaper (the black abrasive, not grey or brown) between plates to warm them in my rarely-used microwave. Same principle.

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One can produce heat in a microwave for browning etc by using a "susceptor" such as the special foil-and-cardboard tray under a frozen pizza (yuk) which browns the crust, or the susceptor patch in the bottom of a popcorn bag which melts the "butter."  I use a small piece of wet-or-dry silicon carbide sandpaper (the black abrasive, not grey or brown) between plates to warm them in my rarely-used microwave. Same principle.

 

I would advise against doing that.

 

Indeed, silicone carbide converses electromagnetic energy into infrared energy.

 

However, silicone carbide coated sandpaper should not be used because:

 

1. in a microwave oven, even with a rotating platter, the heating is highly uneven, causing localized heating, and burning can result.

 

2. The adhesive used on sandpaper is not food safe, when it smokes, which it will, possible toxic fume can coat your food or plates.

 

dcarch

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I've had a microwave in my home since the very first model came on the market in the 70s, the Amana Radarrange.

I simply wouldn't be without one since it makes my life so much easier.  I don't really cook in it but I use it for many, many other things.

I use it every day, at least once.

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I would advise against doing that.

 

Indeed, silicone carbide converses electromagnetic energy into infrared energy.

 

However, silicone carbide coated sandpaper should not be used because:

 

1. in a microwave oven, even with a rotating platter, the heating is highly uneven, causing localized heating, and burning can result.

 

2. The adhesive used on sandpaper is not food safe, when it smokes, which it will, possible toxic fume can coat your food or plates.

 

dcarch

I have been using silicon carbide sandpaper to heat plates for about a year. No smoking, no scorching, no smell, no visible change other than a bit of curling, but admittedly, no FDA approval either.  I do wipe the plates before  using them.

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I have been using silicon carbide sandpaper to heat plates for about a year. No smoking, no scorching, no smell, no visible change other than a bit of curling, but admittedly, no FDA approval either.  I do wipe the plates before  using them.

 

I put a sheet of wet/dry sandpaper in my microwave, soon, smoke was coming out and two holes were burnt thru the paper. Even paper alone can be ignited in a microwave oven.

 

The other important thing to keep in mind, silicone carbide is used extensively to cut stone and glass. I would be hesitant to use silicone carbide abrasive sandpaper in contact with tableware.

 

dcarch

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There are really easier ways to heat plates.  Since you have to wipe them anyway, why not just run hot water on them and dry them and stack them with a towel around them so they stay warm.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I use my microwave frequently, but more often in the summertime.

When the weekly daytime temperature outside hovers around 100°F day after day, my stove and my oven are never turned on. If it can't get heated up or cooked in the microwave, then I must be eating out. :cool:

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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When the weekly daytime temperature outside hovers around 100°F day after day, my stove and my oven are never turned on.

 

I'm not much for cooking proteins in a microwave.

 

I recently posted to this http://forums.egullet.org/topic/121812-how-to-manage-to-cook-in-high-temperatures/  thread about setting up an outdoor kitchen to cook during this hot summer season. I'm still cooking full dinners for 4 adults, just not in the house.

Edited by Porthos (log)

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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I'm not much for cooking proteins in a microwave.

 

I recently posted to this http://forums.egullet.org/topic/121812-how-to-manage-to-cook-in-high-temperatures/  thread about setting up an outdoor kitchen to cook during this hot summer season. I'm still cooking full dinners for 4 adults, just not in the house.

But you're still cooking in the (outdoor) heat. I guess as long as you're not heating up your house, then it must be okay.

 

Unfortunately, I live in an apartment complex where none of the apartments have a backyard/back patio/back balcony. A few of the apartments have have some metal railings on their front porches so they can chain & lock a BBQ grill to it. But the apartment I live in only has a cement step...no railing. So no outdoor cooking for me.  :sad:

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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 I guess as long as you're not heating up your house, then it must be okay.

 

Unfortunately, I live in an apartment complex where none of the apartments have a backyard/back patio/back balcony. ... no railing. So no outdoor cooking for me.  :sad:

 

You're right. My goal to not heat the house.

 

I only lived in one apartment that didn't have some form of outdoor private space. I can, from that apartment, sympathize with you.

 

I am used to cooking in the heat because of my Ren Faire cooking. Doesn't matter if it's raining or 100 degrees and humid, the feast must go on.

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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  • 1 month later...

We have one but we often go several weeks between uses...in fact...I moved it around the 4th of July and it's still unplugged.

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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