Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Anna N

Manitoulin test kitchen

Recommended Posts

Could we have the recipe for the Summer Torte, please?

Thanks to Ann_T for the inspiration:

http://www.thibeaultstable.com/2013/07/summer-torte.html

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's exactly how I clean leeks, also. I've always wondered how one is supposed to clean leeks for recipes where the leeks are left whole, or mostly whole. Unless the grit left in them is supposed to act like sandpaper and sharpen your teeth as you eat?

 

Borek looks wonderful.


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's exactly how I clean leeks, also. I've always wondered how one is supposed to clean leeks for recipes where the leeks are left whole, or mostly whole. Unless the grit left in them is supposed to act like sandpaper and sharpen your teeth as you eat?

 

Borek looks wonderful.

I love leeks but I've only successfully made them ONCE.  I can never get all the grit out no matter how hard I try (when left whole).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's exactly how I clean leeks, also. I've always wondered how one is supposed to clean leeks for recipes where the leeks are left whole, or mostly whole. Unless the grit left in them is supposed to act like sandpaper and sharpen your teeth as you eat?

 

Borek looks wonderful.

Search on the web for episode 113 of Essential Pepin and the master himself will teach you how to clean whole leeks. Thank you for your compliment on the Borek. For so few ingredients it was really quite tasty.

  • Like 2

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love leeks but I've only successfully made them ONCE.  I can never get all the grit out no matter how hard I try (when left whole).

Shelby,

See my answer to Melissa on this same subject.

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning. Breakfast is bacon, eggs and toast. Note to self: bacon is NOT better in the microwave!

image.jpg

  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Anna for the reference to Essential Pepin. Couldn't stop watching the whole show. He is such a good teacher but you have to listen carefully as he gives little tips quietly as he chops!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Anna for the reference to Essential Pepin. Couldn't stop watching the whole show. He is such a good teacher but you have to listen carefully as he gives little tips quietly as he chops!

Yeah. I never had teenage crushes on pop stars but I have an adult crush on Jacques. Could happily watch him over and over again for hours on end.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With no help from Julia or Jacques - for lunch I made a bastardized Reuben.  Based only on the sauerkraut that needed using up - kielbasa, cheddar, mayo/ketchup.  It was tasty if not 'correct'.

 

IMG_1406.jpg

 

IMG_1407.jpg

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy Cow...

 

To me cleaning leeks is like folding fitted sheets - I needed someone to show me how to do it.  Doesn't mean I think ex-con Martha is a god - but I did appreciate seeing how she did it.  


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume this comment will be blocked as being off-topic but I want to say this. I cried the day Julia Child passed. I felt like I had lost a family member. I still use her cookbooks and, on occasion, will watch topic-specific TV segments on YouTube.

  • Like 5

Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

;

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So let's see if we can get back to food as you all mean much to me. Of all the meals on eG it's huiray's that call out most to me and rotuts' encouragement and generosity help restore my faith in mankind.

Not a lot of cooking will take place today. Kerry has just replenished our supply of sugar, milk and butter.

I lay awake last night wondering what I could make for dinner this evening. I did a mental inventory of the freezer and came up with pork from Max Burt's farm. It is labeled as stir-fry pork but when I bought it my intention was to use it for laarb. It was the laarb topic that persuaded me to become a member of eG lo these many years ago.

Don't think I'm likely to find any Thai sticky rice in the house and certainly not in town! So I will toast some jasmine rice and make it do. Beyond that it's only a matter of further chopping up the pork, finding some scallions, some shallots, mint, etc. etc., all of which I'm sure we have. I think I will mostly follow the recipe on Serious Eats which is pretty close to most of the recipes on eG.

  • Like 4

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would surely think that toasting a few tablespoons of rice in a dry pan ought to be one of the easiest culinary tasks ever. But for me toasting rice, seeds, or nuts is one of the most challenging things I will ever do! Either I toast them until they're burned, or I pull them before they have quite reached the ideal level of toastiness. How about you?

image.jpg

image.jpg

Should have gone longer.

  • Like 2

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well, if this is not your 'suit'

 

you might consider 'toasting' them in an oven

 

no steam for them

 

take notes

 

then your' done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too struggle with toasting. I find that the "toastees" require undivided attention and constant stirring/shaking. I have a dump bowl near by so I can get them out of the hot pan if they are going too fast or too long. You can always put them back in for a bit more. The other thing is toasting one kind of seed/spice at a time as they tend to need different treatment.

For practice, there is a recipe for Versatile Vinaigrette in the July issue of Bon Appetit on page 32 which requires toasting of coriander, cumin and fennel seeds(they don't tell you to toast them individually though)....the result is delicious on salads and especially on steak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So let's see if we can get back to food as you all mean much to me. Of all the meals on eG it's huiray's that call out most to me and rotuts' encouragement and generosity help restore my faith in mankind.

Not a lot of cooking will take place today. Kerry has just replenished our supply of sugar, milk and butter.

I lay awake last night wondering what I could make for dinner this evening. I did a mental inventory of the freezer and came up with pork from Max Burt's farm. It is labeled as stir-fry pork but when I bought it my intention was to use it for laarb. It was the laarb topic that persuaded me to become a member of eG lo these many years ago.

Don't think I'm likely to find any Thai sticky rice in the house and certainly not in town! So I will toast some jasmine rice and make it do. Beyond that it's only a matter of further chopping up the pork, finding some scallions, some shallots, mint, etc. etc., all of which I'm sure we have. I think I will mostly follow the recipe on Serious Eats which is pretty close to most of the recipes on eG.

As a fan of laap and of Thai food in general, I would like to recommend Andy Ricker's Pok Pok cookbook. Not only does it have extremely labor intensive recipes (he makes all of his curry pastes from scratch), but there are many stories talking about his travels around Northern Thailand and the people he knows there. It also explains how many dishes are eaten in their native area, which I have found makes for a considerable increase in my enjoyment when trying it "their way". Being in NYC, I am very lucky to have a Pok Pok restaurant relatively nearby - but, supposedly, the recipes in the book are exactly what they do in the restaurant. In the book, he gives at least two recipes for laap (there may be more, I don't remember now and don't have the book handy), and a very interesting story about his friend who makes what he considers to be the seminal version. His friend's version is standard for Northern Thailand - this version has no mint, no (or very little) lime juice and is very different from the laap that is standard in restaurants in the US (I don't know what's available in Canada, but from seeing photos of your Thai lunches in the past, it looks pretty similar to our standard fare here). It's not that spicy, but intensely funky, herbal and completely addictive. He also gives a recipe for Isaan (Northeast Thailand which is very different from Northern Thailand) laap, which is what we would typically think of - with mint, lime juice, etc.

ETA - for clarity


Edited by KennethT (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have Pok Pok up here in Kindle format.  Shall cruise through it later.

 

IMG_1408.jpg

 

Rum swizzles tonight with a sickbird panela rum.

 

Made some grenadine this am to replace the stuff from the fridge that had been tossed.  Really miss all the little bottles that got tossed!

 

Working on some orgeat.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With no help from Julia or Jacques - for lunch I made a bastardized Reuben.  Based only on the sauerkraut that needed using up - kielbasa, cheddar, mayo/ketchup.  It was tasty if not 'correct'.

My husband's family reubens were always made with smoked sausage. The Noo Yawker in me squawked about that; but then again I typically prefer my reuben sans sauerkraut and Thousand Islands dressing.

 

Anna, Kerry can tell you about the issues I had toasting coconut. I believe I destroyed three portions the day we prepped for the workshop she gave for the students here. And I'm not much better with other things that need to get toasted. As if the toasting issues themselves aren't bad enough, I'm also notorious for being impatient about letting nuts and spices cool before I try to grind them. So you probably really don't want me as your kitchen flunky, at least not for that particular task!


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love a Reuben. I've never had one made with sausage but it sounds worth exploring. I love larb as well but for some reason never think about it when meal planning. That too shall be remedied in the near future.

 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made a second strawberry rhubarb galette.  This one has some almond filling in the bottom.

 

A you can see in the first pic there was a bit of overflow - and in my attempt to control it - I placed the inner side of my forearm firmly on the inside of the oven door.  Going to be feeling that for a few days!

 

DSCN3104.jpg

 

DSCN3105.jpg

  • Like 4
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      After ...
      ... I headed to the airport and flew Nanning, China to Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), Vietnam. The meal on board the plane is here.
       
      We landed two hours later and after the usual immigration nonsense  I was met by an old friend and her husband. They had helped me book me a hotel and took me there. The couple are Chinese but live and work in HCMC. They dropped me off at the hotel, made sure I was settled in and took off to attend to some business (they work in the jewellery business, importing and exporting between China and Vietnam), but returned in the evening to take me to dinner.
       
      We went here.
       

       
      The place,  Làng Nướng Nam Bộ,  is huge and, on a Friday evening was packed. My friends ordered - they both speak fluent Vietnamese whereas mine is limited to the basics. I just looked around.
       

       

       

       
      Each table was supplied with
       

      Tissues and two dips. One was fish sauce and the other seemed to be shrimp paste with sesame.
       
      and
       

      A bag of crackers, some pickled gherkins or similar and a dip of salt and chilli
       

      Steamed Chicken with Banana Hearts
       

      Vietnamese Fried Spring Rolls - accompanied by a mixed selection of raw greens, which are served with almost everything.
       

      Grilled Venison with Grilled Okra
       

      Hotpot protein - squid, shrimp, clams, beef
       

      Hotpot Vegetables - including both banana hearts and shoots.
       
      Everything was good. Especially the venison. I hadn't expected okra, but it seems to be popular. Every market I visited had some, but I'm getting ahead of myself. More to come.
    • By Foodiversal
      Hi everybody! I'm Jake, I'm 26 and from the United Kingdom. I've recently left a career in science teaching and I really hope to pursue my true passion, food writing by becoming either a recipe developer, a food journalist, or both! I've launched my website today so thought it was a good time to get active in some online forums and say hello! I look forward to meeting and interacting with you all ❤️ 
    • By Panaderia Canadiense
      Hello again from south of the equator!  As you may or may not have heard (because the international news media isn't really giving the situation much coverage), Ecuador is in the grip of a major social protest movement.  This started on October 1, when fuel subsidies in the country were abruptly struck causing the prices of gasoline and diesel to more than double overnight.  Transport and heavy haulage unions immediately went on strike, and blocked the main roads of the cities with their vehicles in protest.  The indigenous movements of the central Sierra, beginning in my province, Tungurahua, joined the strike on October 2, and the President quickly declared a State of Emergency that restricts movement, freedom of the press, and freedom association.  The indigenous took over the road blockades on October 3, cutting the cities off from the world; Ambato became an island overnight.
       
      It is now October 8, one week into the blockades.  Shortages in the fresh markets and supermarkets began on Sunday, as people realized that we were in for a long-haul of protest and possibly an overthrow of the sitting government.  Ecuador's indigenous have a long history of deposing governments in this way, and it's not a fast process.
       
      I'll be blogging informally throughout the National Strike, to document how the inevitable food shortages affect the city and my own table. 
       
      These first pictures are from Sunday, October 6.  In the Mercado Mayorista, a place I've always taken you along to when I've blogged from Ambato, the cement floors of the naves are visible in places where they have never, in my experience, been exposed.  The fresh corn nave is all but abandoned - this is because all of the corn in the city's stock has been sold.  I'll remind you: a nave in this market is about a thousand square metres of space.  This is also missing the big trucks that come to trade fresh grains in the parking lot, because they couldn't make it through the roadblocks.  Most of the Mayorista is in the same situation - stocks are selling off fast.

       
      The supermarkets are even more dire.  The meat coolers are completely empty, and the produce shelves are diminishing quickly.



       
    • By Kerry Beal
      @Alleguede and I are in the lounge at Pearson awaiting our flight to Vegas for the IBIE (International Baking Industry Exhibition).
       
      I got the usually bomb sniffing swab done on my electronics - @Alleguede got the 3rd degree at customs. Anyone know what a carnet is? I believe I got that lecture the last time.
       

       
      Made myself a little cocktail, Maker's Mark, Grand Marnier, vintage port. I've had better! 
       

       
      Not a lot of choices to eat since it's rather late (not that earlier would have helped) - they also have pasta salad, Italian Wedding soup, Cream of mushroom soup, corn chips and salsa. There appear to be some cookies there as well. I'm trying to low carb as much as possible so I'm avoiding most of it.
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
    • By ElsieD
      Host's note: the initial title of this thread was "Swarvin' in ???"  as a teaser.  Once the destination was identified as Newfoundland, the title was changed to reflect this.  The initial comments were based on the ??? In the title.
       
       
      And we'll soon be off.......culinary adventures to follow.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...