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Eye of Round - Looking For Suggestions


Porthos
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Since I have been unemployed for the last 7 months (still am) my DW and I opted for 7 lbs of eye of round roast for the Family Christmas Dinner we host. It is a far cry from the standing rib roast from last year.

I am looking for suggestions for the best way to cook this. If you can make suggestions as to roast, braise, etc that will point me in the right direction to research recipes I would be most grateful.

Thanks.

p.s.

I have had such poor luck using the search tool that if you can provide viable links I will gladly look at those also.

Porthos

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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I make salt roasted beef with an eye of the round. My husbands family has used the recipe for probably 40 years, tried and true. I can give you the recipe, the jist of it is a crust made of salt with black pepper, chili sauce, mustard, and cloves. The crust keeps the juices in and breaks away easily. Family favorite.

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Got a nice eye of round in the fridge right now. Salted 1 tsp of kosher salt per pound, left to sit overnight in a bag. Sous vide for 24 hours at 55º C. Then browned in my BGE at high heat.

I'm not certain that you sous vide though.

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There's another thread about it here.

Pot roast or braising would normally be indicated for a lean cut like that, but I have also read about barding and seasoning the meat and roasting it at 500 for 7mins/lb, then turning the oven off and leaving for 2 1/2hrs. Something tells me that Kim Shook has used this method but perhaps I'm remembering that wrong....

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Cold smoking produced a wonderful eye of round for me. A simple Weber kettle will work, or any similar device. The results are like a combination of pastrami and prosciutto.

Slather the round with pink salt , sugar, and Romanian spices for 1 week, in a fruit cellar or fridge,

Slow smoke with mild chips, apple or hickory, for 5 hours or until the meat reaches 125 F. Rest 30 minutes.

Slice thinly against the grain and serve with vegetables and potatoes, including steamed cabbage.

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Cold smoking produced a wonderful eye of round for me. A simple Weber kettle will work, or any similar device. The results are like a combination of pastrami and prosciutto.

Slather the round with pink salt , sugar, and Romanian spices for 1 week, in a fruit cellar or fridge,

Slow smoke with mild chips, apple or hickory, for 5 hours or until the meat reaches 125 F. Rest 30 minutes.

Slice thinly against the grain and serve with vegetables and potatoes, including steamed cabbage.

By pink salt, you mean curing salt, right?

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Cold smoking produced a wonderful eye of round for me. A simple Weber kettle will work, or any similar device. The results are like a combination of pastrami and prosciutto.

Slather the round with pink salt , sugar, and Romanian spices for 1 week, in a fruit cellar or fridge,

Slow smoke with mild chips, apple or hickory, for 5 hours or until the meat reaches 125 F. Rest 30 minutes.

Slice thinly against the grain and serve with vegetables and potatoes, including steamed cabbage.

By pink salt, you mean curing salt, right?

Yes. I actually used Readycure, a white curing product made in Canada, which is a good strength (weak) for rubbing. Pink salt is hard to find in Ontario. The cured and slightly smoked eye of round is dense with a fairly intense flavor. Surprised me.

Edited by jayt90 (log)
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There's another thread about it here.

Pot roast or braising would normally be indicated for a lean cut like that, but I have also read about barding and seasoning the meat and roasting it at 500 for 7mins/lb, then turning the oven off and leaving for 2 1/2hrs. Something tells me that Kim Shook has used this method but perhaps I'm remembering that wrong....

I always thought that pot roasting or braising was not indicated for lean cuts like eye of round. No fat, no collagen, no good.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Since I have been unemployed for the last 7 months (still am) my DW and I opted for 7 lbs of eye of round roast for the Family Christmas Dinner we host. It is a far cry from the standing rib roast from last year.

I am looking for suggestions for the best way to cook this. If you can make suggestions as to roast, braise, etc that will point me in the right direction to research recipes I would be most grateful.

Thanks.

I'm a huge fan of braising for a number of reasons, but the payoff is not the least of them: Even when I cook for a group of people who barely notice what they're eating, braised meat (especially beef) elicits a lot of enthusiastic praise for its tenderness and flavour.

I brown the meat in a Dutch oven over medium high temperature while the oven is preheating to between 250 and 300F, add enough broth to come about halfway up the height of the meat, and braise for 2 to 5 hours (I'm giving ranges for time and temperature, since I don't always have 5 hours in which to cook the meat, and I don't always truss, so sometimes I'm working with a flat piece). Make sure the cover fits snugly.

When you're done, you should have savoury, moist, tender meat, and the makings of an excellent gravy. It won't be the prettiest thing, and will tend to fall to bits when you cut it unless you have a really sharp knife, but it will taste amazing (more so than many prettier dishes).

If I have the time, I salt the meat for 24 to 48 hours in advance (and use a low-sodium broth); I usually add lovage and a little nutmeg to the braising liquid, and sometimes a clove or two.

p.s.

I have had such poor luck using the search tool that if you can provide viable links I will gladly look at those also.

Porthos

PM me if you'd like a hand with the search tool. It's relatively straightforward, but not necessarily intuitive.

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Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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I am very, very happy with the result of the CI recipe. You would never know what an inexpensive cut of meat it was. The best part - about 3 pounds of left-overs. Thank you all for you input.

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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