Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 4)


Recommended Posts

Three recent acquisitions for me:

"The Classic Art of Viennese Pastry" by Christine Berl

"The Baker's Dozen Cookbook" edited by Rick Rodgers

and

"The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook" by Matt Lee and Ted Lee

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I don't know about Christmas, but I do know that a new Costco opening in the neighbourhood last week means that I have 2 new cookbooks. Another 1 because I got the new Norene Gilletz when she was in town last week. Add another 6 that I've received in the last month.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

My daughter sent me a signed copy of Alice Waters' new cookbook, The Art of Simple Food.

Just casually flipping thorough it I have already stuck Post-it notes on several pages with recipes I want to try ASAP.

I also received a package of eight cookbooks by James Peterson from a friend who found a box of cookbooks in a thrift store and I don't think I have any of these.

So far The Duck Cookbook looks really interesting.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I just couldn't resist a remaindered copy of Ripert/Ruhlman's A Return to Cooking. Sigh.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear, I'm obviously addicted - about 5000 and still counting - Gordon Ramsay's Chef and Francesco's Kitchen for Christmas with about 7 other historical books and 10 still to come to add to the Italian and Indian sections..... How do people sort them or has this been asked before?

Sue

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Culinary Artistry, Dornenburg and Page. I got one for some friends as a Festivus present, and of course I had to buy one for myself as well.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Those monthly "Please come back to us and get 4 books for $1 plus your first purchase at half price" emails from The Good Cook finally bludgeoned me into submission. Well, that, along with a desire to both own The Elements of Cooking and to get one as a present for a friend. I have to buy only one more over the next year, at the club price, so that's not bad at all.

The damages:

The Elements of Cooking

Chocolate & Zucchini

What's a Cook to Do?

Not Your Mother's Slow Cooker Recipes for Two (for Ms. Alex)

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Two more for me "Nanny Ogg's Cookbook" and "The Recipe Hall of Fame Quick and Easy Cookbook" Nanny Ogg's is a Terry Pratchet book, and like most of his stuff, is screamingly funny. I doubt I'll ever cook from it, but it's ROTFLMAO funny.

Quick and Easy, on the other hand has some very tasty sounding stuff, like an apple salad with caramel... YUM! :biggrin:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Similar Content

    • By cteavin
      I was getting my daily YouTube fix a bit ago and this video reminded me of you guys: a how to on making dashi with Japanese soups I'd never heard of. The recipe seems simple enough. Enjoy, if you're inclined. 
       
       
    • By Rushina
      What would you like to be included in a cookbook you classify as a "good cookbook"?
      Rushina
    • By Multiwagon
      Other than the three written by Michael Ruhlman, which I have read and loved, what other books are out there that are about cooking, but not cookbooks?
    • By OliverB
      I just received a copy of "The Cook's Book - Concise Edition" edited by Jill Norman, and now I'm curious, what's the difference to the full edition? Supposedly it has 648 pages compared to 496 in this edition, and it appears to be much larger in size if the info on us.dk.com is correct. Other than that I can't find any info what the difference might be. It's a neat book with lots of photos about techniques etc, and lots of recipes. As with any DK book production values are high.
      If the contents are the same, I'm happy with the smaller version, but I'd really like to know what I might be missing on those 150 or so pages. If it's just filler, I don't care. If it's some fantastic recipes, I do care....
      Anybody here know both editions? Google was so far of no help. Lots of the full edition are to be had used as well, I'd be happy giving this one as a gift and ordering the full edition, if it's worth it.
      Thanks!
      Oliver
    • By devlin
      Say you were rounded up with a group of folks and either had a skill to offer in exchange for a comfy room and some other niceties or were sent off to a slag heap to toil away in the hot sun every day for 16 hours, what 3 books would you want to take with you to enable you to cook and bake such fabulous foodstuffs that your kidnappers would keep you over some poor schlub who could cook only beans and rice and the occasional dry biscuit?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...