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AmritaBala

Pot Noodles/Cup Noodles/ Instant Ramen

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I'm not sure what brand you guys have in the US but over here, I think the best has to be KOKA, hands down..they even have new ones which use Rice Noodles and are only 210 cals..(Or maybe thet are just lying)

They have...

1. Tom Yam

2. Laksa

3. Chicken Abalone

4. Spicy Marinara

5. Seafood

So, which brand or flavor do you secretly indulge in when the chef in you goes to sleep?

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I've never eaten a package of instant noodles in my life!! I have an aversion to " canned soup" and too much sodium.

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I love "MAMA" brand, especially the pork flavor, but the sodium's a killer... I haven't had any since I was diagnosed with high blood pressure. (sigh.)

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They seem to have low sodium ones now days (yeah maybe 10mg less, LOL!)...

I don't believe some people live on this stuff..

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I like Bowl Noddle, Nong Shim brand. Its instant noddles in a little plastic soup bowl. I just checked the sodium content - 1083mg! I thought that was pretty bad. Then I looked at the serving size = one half bowl! Wow. I guess I won't be buying them anymore.

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there are a billion packages of instant Asian soups I am astounded!!! all types flavors and kinds

but I have not tried any either ...

I will tell you what I do

I buy the bulk ramen noodles (they cost about $2 for a huge bag of them) and make saimen (sp?) like they serve in Hawaii

it is lower in salt because you can use your own broth then just top with all kinds of leftovers!

boil broth put noodles in ..top with chopped up left overs!!! there you go instant soup..instant use of leftovers ...great way to use up all those little containers of stock in the freezer

are fried noodles good for you? not really but they taste good and you can jsut pump it up nutritionally with the stuff you add

maybe one of these days I will try some of the instant ones..how could there be so many if no one eats them?

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::looks around furtively:: ...i eat them... ::duck::

i try no to think about the sodium content... i also don't usually drink all the liquid anyway.

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They got low-cal instant ramen/noodle cups here advertised as "well-being food) (korean-english for health food). I'll try to post some pics of them.

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I don't see a huge difference between eating an occasional packet of instant ramen and making a bowl of soup using dried noodles and ready-made-dashi (some of the commercially available dashi are quite high in sodium and other additives).

Having a few packets of the Thai Mama brand Tom Yum Shrimp flavour noodles around is a satisfying alternative to getting 'takeaway' food. Within 6 minutes I can stir fry some vegetables, add the noodles, soup stock and some water to the pan and have it all served in a bowl.

I wouldn't like to eat this way every day, but as an occasional treat, it's great!

Once you have a bottle of ready made dashi around, making soba or udon noodles is just as 'instant' and straightforward as anything from a packet, soba in particular is quick and easy with a cooking time of just 4 minutes. I'm currently using this stock: http://www.yamato-soysauce-miso.com/produc...esoupstock.html which I particularly like. Add a pinch of dried wakame if you like it, another instant classic.

Some of the Vietnamese Vifon brand's packet noodles are really enjoyable, unfortunately, I never kept notes on which ones we particularly liked

This guy has: http://noodleson.com/review/category/vietnamese-brand/vifon/

But we have started to keep a folder recently with packets of noodles we do like.

So far it's made of:

Japan - Nissin's Ramen Yassan (ラメン屋さん) - salt flavour しお

(the blue packet here: http://ramenyasan.com/ )

Korea - Samyang Foods - Rich Hot Flavour Noodle (also called Sutah Ramen https://www.samyangfood.co.kr/eng/products_pac_2.htm )

Also by Samyang Foods - Chacharoni https://www.samyangfood.co.kr/eng/products_pac_10.htm

Japan - Sanyo Foods - 名古屋こく塩 (green) and 博多とんこつ (yellow) both of which are shown on this page (second and last) : http://www.sanyofoods.co.jp/product/produc...%C2%83p%83b%83N

Japan's Myojo Chukazanmai brand is consistently good http://noodleson.com/review/category/japan...jo-chukazanmai/ but these and the sanyo foods recs contain meat so its my husband who will vouch for them them (I draw the line at fish)

So far we've tended to agree with the writer of the noodleson.com website so I recommend it. There are some really horrid noodles out there, a lot of very mediocre ones and just not enough help in avoiding them

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Mi goreng noodles from indomie... Those things are freaking addictive.

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Mi goreng noodles from indomie... Those things are freaking addictive.

Any of the "mi goreng" varieties in particular?

According to http://noodleson.com/review/category/indonesian-brand/ there are at least 4 different kinds from Indomie.

I like the plain one.

I keep them around for days when I'm just not up to cooking--I live alone and I'm a university student, that's my excuse.

I like Mama brand, and Koka's not bad either. Occasionally, I get a craving for Maggi's Assam Laksa, just because.

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Top Ramen Oriental flavor- the only vegetarian option widely available. Tasty, salty, and probably very bad for you.

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I think they can make quite a nice desperation meal if you add fresh vegetables, fried tofu, shrimp, etc. Also, I usually cook the noodles first and then take them out of the cooking water and add them to the broth--this makes the broth much less disgustingly viscous and almost even good, since the excess oil and starch from the noodles is left behind in the cooking water.

Sometimes I pack them for lunch this way in a Mr. Bento thermal lunch jar, and then all you have to do is combine the noodles and toppings and add hot water (toppings are in top right container):

gallery_54826_5172_717689.jpg

Of course by the time you've done all this it's hardly "instant" anymore, but it is much more tasty and healthful.

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On an EVA (airline of Taiwan) they brought out trays of some kind of noodle cups, tossed them at us. After everyone had them they came down the aisle and poured the boiling water on them. I remember it as one of the more tasty airplane snacks......seemed somehow appropriate

Funny part was, some Americans around us did not know what they were. They peeled back the top and started nibbling on all the crunchy bits.

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Many of the instant ramen brands I see in the US have more than 50% of your daily values of fat. (They usually label it as 25% but claim that there are two servings per package -- who the hell eats only half a package?) Where is this fat coming from? Do they fry the noodles?

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Sorry to revive such an ancient discussion...

I was at work and had a cup of dried ramen-type noodles with seasonings...the kind you add the boiling water to and then let sit for a short while, then eat. 

I had poured the hot water into the cup of dried seasoned ramen when I got called into a meeting. An hour later ( :shock: ) I returned to my desk and re-opened the still-covered cup of noodles to find that a lot of the broth has disappeared, into the noodles (of course). The noodles were a lot more plump than when you just let them sit for the usual 3 to 5 minutes. It was still hot but not blazing hot so I could start eating it right away. After eating the noodles, there was some broth left to drink but not a lot. 

So now I don't fix the "Cup 'o' Noodle" type ramens any other way. I let them sit/steep for an hour before eating them and think the difference is eye opening, to say the least.

Has anyone else discovered this?

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Sorry to revive such an ancient discussion...

I was at work and had a cup of dried ramen-type noodles with seasonings...the kind you add the boiling water to and then let sit for a short while, then eat. 

I had poured the hot water into the cup of dried seasoned ramen when I got called into a meeting. An hour later ( :shock: ) I returned to my desk and re-opened the still-covered cup of noodles to find that a lot of the broth has disappeared, into the noodles (of course). The noodles were a lot more plump than when you just let them sit for the usual 3 to 5 minutes. It was still hot but not blazing hot so I could start eating it right away. After eating the noodles, there was some broth left to drink but not a lot. 

So now I don't fix the "Cup 'o' Noodle" type ramens any other way. I let them sit/steep for an hour before eating them and think the difference is eye opening, to say the least.

Has anyone else discovered this?

 

I do it both ways and have done it for years, though I still generally prefer them closer to the "recommended time range".  I usually let them sit a little longer than the suggested time, though.  One variety that I sometimes deliberately do in the "extended sitting style" is Nong Shim's Kimchi Noodle Bowl; once in a while I do it with one of the Little Cook noodle bowls, usually the Mushroom Vegetarian one.  Some of the noodle bowls with the really skinny noodles - like the Sau Tao Noodle King bowls (wonton flavor, chicken-abalone flavor, etc) - have noodles that certainly become softer with prolonged steeping but don't become the swollen noodles of the sort you experienced while much of the soup still remains.  These are in waxed cardboard bowls, though, not styrofoam bowls - so they do become at most barely lukewarm after standing around for a long time.

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I started testing high sodium ramen since my post above..wow I how did I ever go with out these and while I still make my own ....I am sold on instant ramen! AT least once a week my husband and I  roll around in all kinds of instant high sodium goodness .I hack the crap out of if with lots of vegetables or meat or whatever I have on hand.  

my top 3 current favorites ..I honestly eat this stuff once a week with out shame! it is so good!

1. Ottogi Korean style Sesame flavor with an egg block (it is spicy and delicious! I add kimchi and an egg and wow dinner! ) 

2. Sapporo Ichiban Shio Ramen with sesame 

3. Indomie chicken curry it is fun to make it I stir fry it and let the noodles soak up all the water (I use half ) 

 

3 I have on hand to try next

1. Prima Food Singapore Curry La Mian

2. Xu Gon Vietnamese Artificial Roasted Duck Flavor 

3. Nongshim Japanese style Soba Noodles with sauce  

 

I plan on trying every instant ramen noodle variety that sparks me ..I eat enough healthy shit to equal out my day. 

 

 

Please share your favorites and favorite hacks for instant ramen ..the possibilities are endless 

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