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Eggs, Beaten, w/ Stuff Inside -Cook-Off 19


Chris Amirault
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Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.

For our nineteenth Cook-Off, we're making eggs, beaten, with stuff in them.

:hmmm:

All right, all right, so the name sucks. Feel free to pick your own favorite from among the other suggestions: "Souffles, Frittatas, Omelettes," my best shot but too European for my tastes; "Eggs, Filled, Folded, Fluffed," snowangel's variation on the one I went with; "Eggstravaganza!" -- a name we'll have to save for the Broadway musical adaptation of this cook-off.

What we're talking about here are egg dishes that require beating the eggs -- either en masse a la the omelette or yolk and white separately then combined a la the soufflé -- and then combining them with other ingredients. This is an admittedly wide berth, but you probably get the drift. Frittata? Yes. Deviled eggs? No (not beaten).

It seems to me like a good cook-off idea because eggs, beaten, with stuff in them appear throughout the cuisines of the world. We've got the eGCI course on omelettes here and the Q&A here. There are at least two solid threads on Italian frittatas here and here. Check out the chawanmushi in this tamago thread. My initial attempts at searching suggest that we're still in need of a definitive Bindae-dduk recipe (the Korean omelette), and I think that we may see a few egg foo yungs before the cook-off is over.

So fire up the skillets, people, and get out those whisks. This promises to be eggcellent!

Ok, I couldn't resist. :biggrin:

Chris Amirault

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Beaten, huh? Sounds like S&M to me ... :hmmm:

Great idea for a topic .. very wide range possible with this ... looking forward to seeing what everyone prepares .. lots of pictures as well, I'll bet! I can smell the bacon crisping already and I keep kosher ... :laugh:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Ok, I have a question. Is there a generic name for that Korean omelette dish? My first search turned up bindae-duk, but now I think that's wrong. The dish I love at our local Korean place is called haemul-pajun: a seafood and scallion omelette. Anyone know?

Chris Amirault

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I have an emergency spinach and bacon frittata in the oven right now. I say emergency because I just tasted the beef rendang I spent the afternoon making and realized 1-2 of my 3 kids are going to find it FAR too spicy for dinner. The menu:

Beef rendang

basmati rice

braised cabbage

salad with mango, onion, and spiced pecans

AND frittata

I want to make a souffle -- looks like this is my big chance. Bring on the advice and recipes, please!

~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

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Any thoughts on what to do with a bunch of egg whites? I have 10 sitting in the refrigerator, waiting for something interesting, and I'm just not up to quite that much meringue. :wacko:

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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Ok, I have a question. Is there a generic name for that Korean omelette dish? My first search turned up bindae-duk, but now I think that's wrong. The dish I love at our local Korean place is called haemul-pajun: a seafood and scallion omelette. Anyone know?

Just "pajun", I guess.

See this post.

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Ok, I have a question. Is there a generic name for that Korean omelette dish? My first search turned up bindae-duk, but now I think that's wrong. The dish I love at our local Korean place is called haemul-pajun: a seafood and scallion omelette. Anyone know?

i don't, but that's not an omelette, or at least i should say, that's not how i think of one. haemul-pajun and bindaeduk are definitely more in the pancake universe, unless you want to define this cook-off as 'eggs, beaten, with stuff in them, including significant amounts of wheat and rice flour.' or in the case of bindaeduk, mung beans.

there is definitely a korean dish that is beaten eggs, usually served in a small heated stone bowl with some boiling water in it. and they put all kinds of things in them--bits of sausage, scallions, etc. but basically it's a steamed beaten egg dish, and unfortunately don't know the name of it.

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Any thoughts on what to do with a bunch of egg whites? I have 10 sitting in the refrigerator, waiting for something interesting, and I'm just not up to quite that much meringue.  :wacko:

egg white souffle! there's a recipe in julia child for a cheese version, but you can totally make it with any kind of vegetable puree or whatever. no need for egg yolks in a souffle. i might make one myself this week--i have a bunch of egg whites in the freezer too...

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Cool. I am just beginning to learn how to work with egg substitutes for everyday cooking, so this would be a great excuse to see how many tricks I can persuade them to do.

(Don't worry, folks, I am not totally abandoning "real" eggs, but they have necessarily become a special-occasion treat for the time being.)

I was tempted to suggest that blintzes could conceivably fit with the "eggs, beaten, with stuff in them" template--okay, so you don't put the "stuff" inside the beaten eggs until after they've been cooked--but as I'm not really up for making blintzes anyway, for me at least it's a moot point. :biggrin:

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Any thoughts on what to do with a bunch of egg whites? I have 10 sitting in the refrigerator, waiting for something interesting, and I'm just not up to quite that much meringue.  :wacko:

egg white souffle! there's a recipe in julia child for a cheese version, but you can totally make it with any kind of vegetable puree or whatever. no need for egg yolks in a souffle. i might make one myself this week--i have a bunch of egg whites in the freezer too...

Ditto. Sometimes egg white souffles are better than the yolk-y version.

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Cool. I am just beginning to learn how to work with egg substitutes for everyday cooking, so this would be a great excuse to see how many tricks I can persuade them to do.

I'm guessing that Impossible Pie counts, which is how I used up the last of the flavored mostly egg white egg substitute I had laying around (coupons + curiosity = some weird purchases). It made the best Impossible Pie to date - the egg whites gave it a far lighter and fluffier texture than real eggs, which we both agreed was very good indeed.

Marcia.

Don't forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted...he lived happily ever after. -- Willy Wonka

eGullet foodblog

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I guess Double cooked souffles or Tortilla de Patata are in, but

What about chocolate mousse/molten/roulade/etc?

Indeed, roulades in general..Does the classification run to flourless cakes, or even genoise or Victoria Sponge?

Svoury custard? Creme Anglais? Petit pot de creme? Creme Brulle?

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Ever since reading about soft scrambled (large curd) eggs here on eGullet, I've been hankering for them.

This past Sunday morning I made them for breakfast. I started with some sautéed shallots and diced garlic beef sausage (which I get from a local grocery chain that makes it own sausages). In a small bowl, I cracked open three large eggs, added some milk (it may have been as much as a half cup or more...I just eyeballed it) and used my hand-cranked egg beaters to whip it all up into a frothy golden mess.

I poured the egg mixture over the shallots and sausage (I had turned the heat down to low) and slowly but methodically stirred up large curds of egg until almost all the liquid was gone. I added fresh ground pepper and a little kosher salt and some grated sharp cheddar cheese. I put a lid on the pan and removed it from the heat. By the time I poured my coffee and got the plate, the scrambled eggs were done, the cheese melted from residual heat in the pan.

Sorry I don't have a picture but take solace in the fact that they were quite good, a sort of comfort food from my youth.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Ever since reading about soft scrambled (large curd) eggs here on eGullet

There are other acceptable ways to scramble eggs? :wink: Sounds delicious!

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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I made an omelette with shallots and parsley for lunch, but it didn't turn out as well as I had hoped. The outside was too brown, and turning it was a pain. I don't have an omelette pan, only a crepe pan, and the little edge on that wasn't conducive to turning the omelette. I ended up using a spatula. The eggs did turn out nice and fluffy, though.

-- There are infinite variations on food restrictions. --

Crooked Kitchen - my food blog

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I've not actively joined a cook-off before - although I've read many of the threads with interest.

My question is 'Does Kaiserschmarrn count as a beaten egg dish with stuff in it?' The picture clearly shows eggs - and beating of aforementioned eggs so I hope this counts. I am worried some people might interpret it as more of a pancake type dish than an omelettey thing, although it does translate as emperors omelette and the version I intend to use contains five eggs - rather than the meagre three shown in the pictorial I've linked to.

Ja? Nein? Let me know please and I'm all over it!

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Today's breakfast was an omelette filled with some asparagus, ham, and a little bit of leftover cheese fondue. Unfortunately my pan was a bit too hot (I just switched from an electric to a gas cooktop and am still figuring it out) and the eggs got crunchy on the edges before the fillings were completely heated. A good mix of flavors though.

"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

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Always with the questions! :biggrin: Well, as William Burroughs wrote, "Be just. If you can't be just, be arbitrary."

In general, I think that we should stick to things that are recognizably egg-based. So while many cakes could be described as "eggs, beaten, with stuff in them," I would say that they shouldn't count. And I don't see why we should stick to retrograde pre-21st century categories of savory and sweet, right?

So, keeping in mind that my court has neither an appeals system nor any means of enforcement (:raz:):

Oh, this one should be fun! Would I be thrown out, though, if I made the spam souffle again?

You would not!

Do sweet souffles and mousses count?

Yes they do!

i don't, but that's not an omelette, or at least i should say, that's not how i think of one.  haemul-pajun and bindaeduk are definitely more in the pancake universe, unless you want to define this cook-off as 'eggs, beaten, with stuff in them, including significant amounts of wheat and rice flour.'  or in the case of bindaeduk, mung beans.

To me, the haemul-pajun retains the quality of an egg dish even with some flour added. (After all, some soufflé recipes include a bit of flour for stability.)

I'm guessing that Impossible Pie counts, which is how I used up the last of the flavored mostly egg white egg substitute I had laying around (coupons + curiosity = some weird purchases). It made the best Impossible Pie to date - the egg whites gave it a far lighter and fluffier texture than real eggs, which we both agreed was very good indeed.

What's Impossible Pie? The judges need more information on this one.

I guess Double cooked souffles or Tortilla de Patata are in, but

What about chocolate mousse/molten/roulade/etc?

Indeed, roulades in general..Does the classification run to flourless cakes, or even genoise or Victoria Sponge?

Svoury custard? Creme Anglais? Petit pot de creme? Creme Brulle?

:wacko: Um, see above! I'd want to say yes certainly to anything that retains its eggy-ness, Jack. What do you think?

My question is 'Does Kaiserschmarrn count as a beaten egg dish with stuff in it?' 

Ja!

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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