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Eggs, Beaten, w/ Stuff Inside -Cook-Off 19


Chris Amirault
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What's Impossible Pie? The judges need more information on this one.

I just did a little research, and this one may be on the cusp.

Going through my collection of Bisquick cookbooks and pamphlets, in "So Quick With Bisquick" cookbook (1967), impossible pies were unknown. There are quite a few recipes in "Bisquick Family Favorites" (1991), and by 1993, "Bisquick Classic Recipes" has an entire section dedicated to them.

The category has apparently more recently been renamed, and is now called Impossibly Easy Pie. The basic mixture calls for 1/4 cup of Bisquick (or baking mix) to one egg, with most recipes calling for 3 to 4 eggs. This gives a remarkably quiche-like texture, and some of it browns to form a "crust" on the bottom, which gave rise to the impossible name. I believe that the amount of Bisquick in the standard recipe is still less than the amount of flour in a quiche crust.

I have to admit that before looking this up I had completely forgotten that the official ratio of egg to Bisquick was so high, since I tend to use 1/2 - 1/3 cup Bisquick to three eggs - not only because I like the texture, but I tend to use the Bisquick as more of a stabilizing agent (high altitude, you know).

Anyway, I submit to the judge the following classic recipes for evaluation and judgement:

Impossibly Easy Bacon Pie

Impossibly Easy Ham and Swiss Pie

Impossibly Easy Cheeseburger Pie, the perennial classic

And getting back on to the subject of eggs, beaten, and stuff, the spam souffle was planned for tomorrow but unfortunately it looks like we're going to have a long visit with Lowe's, as one of our bathroom sinks unexpectedly rusted through this evening. So it's dinner out, but since eggs are on sale at 50 cents/dozen at Safeway Friday - Sunday, the souffle WILL get made!

Marcia.

Don't forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted...he lived happily ever after. -- Willy Wonka

eGullet foodblog

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Chris, is it okay if the stuff in the scrambled eggs is eggs? I've recently noticed a few dishes in different books -- most recently Jose Andres's tapas book, and also in some books of Mideastern recipes -- that are variants on this theme: you cook some scrambled eggs and then towards the end of cooking you crack some whole eggs over them. This creates not only a dramatic presentation but also you get the curdy scrambled eggs and the gooey texture of a fried/poached/soft-boiled egg at the same time as the yolks run all over the scrambled eggs.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Fat Guy: I don't know how Chris will rule, but I'd love to see some picks of that!!!

"Anybody can make you enjoy the first bite of a dish, but only a real chef can make you enjoy the last.”

Francois Minot

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These eggs sort of have stuff in them, if stuff can be dashi, soy sauce and sugar...

Do you call them stuff? :blink::biggrin: I'm going to make my versions for lunch, with other stuff.

I guess it depends on how we are defining "stuff" :biggrin:

I am planning something else for Saturday.....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Finally a cook off I could do without running all over town!

I used to leftover mushrooms I had made last night with garlic, onion, and red wine and combined them with scrambled eggs. Sliced the leftover t-bone and some grapes made a wonderful brunch.

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Kristen - I LOVE those type of eggs. I even bought a tomago pan just to make rolled omelets! I tried using chopsticks to "flip" it but I sucked! Sad since I've used chopsticks all my life. Looks nummy!

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gallery_16375_5_38842.jpg

I made three different versions:

Left: Western style (3 eggs and milk) with processed cheese in it, with pizza sauce I previously made

Middle: Sweetened version (3 eggs and 2 tbsp kaeshi) with nori in it, with grated daikon and soy sauce

Right: Unsweetened version (3 eggs, soy sauce, and dashi powder) with fake crabmeat in it, with ume chirimen (a type of furikake with pickled plum)

I must say I wasn't impressed with any of them. I'm convinced that atsuyaki tamago should have nothing in it and should not be sweetened.

My regular atsuyaki tamago recipe can be found here on RecipeGullet.

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Hiroyuki, I did not make this atsuyaki tamago, but ate some this evening at a local sushi place. I thought the presentation was very interesting:

gallery_2_2561_1248.jpg

Oh, yes, interesting presentation, but it's SWEETENED, I suppose. I don't know why Japanese people like to sweeten eggs...

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Egg things are a standby around here. Tonight I made a large omelette with bacon, green onion, fresh tomato, a little salt and pepper, and a scrape of parmesan. Cut it into two wedges and we had it with toast. Perfect for a light dinner. The other day it was scrambled eggs, with this divine "mediterranean style" yoghurt - about as thick as clotted cream and deliciously sharp and tangy, and lots of butter. I had just a sprinkle of cheddar on top, the husband had cheddar and salsa because he does not respect my beautiful delicate scrambled eggs. Sigh. Also he asked me to cook them longer. Fine, but mine come out of the pan first. I fear tough scrambled eggs.

The thing I keep wanting to master and not doing because I'm chickenshit is flipping the omelette by hand in the pan - that much vaunted wrist action. I know I couldn't do it with a cast iron pan, I have weak wrists. I do have a small all-clad omelette pan but I'm still rather nervous since I've been doing omelettes the poke-with-spatula way since I was ten.

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quiche1.jpg

Pancetta, Asparagus, Mushroom & Truffle Quiche

I'm not happy with this shot. I made 3 quiches and they were all of differing heights so we decided to polish off the two smaller ones first and let the big one cool till tomorrow for easier slicing. The smallest one was in the pic and was slightly overcooked so you I didn't get that lovely tender custard. Plus, the lighting makes the mushrooms look awful. I'll take another pic tomorrow morning of the deep one.

Incidentally, this quiche was made with an Oil Crust since i'm too cowardly to make a proper pate brisee (not cowardly technique wise, I'm just afraid of so much saturated fat). The crust was a bit pale on the bottom and probably could have done with a blind baking before the ingredients went in. But the crust was tender and tasty and very easy to make.

PS: I am a guy.

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I'd be happy to do a souffle demo.

Any requests as to type/flavouring?

(cheese or chocolate, or veg or fruit puree, or Grand Marnier etc etc)

Cheese or Grand Marnier!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I'd be happy to do a souffle demo.

Any requests as to type/flavouring?

(cheese or chocolate, or veg or fruit puree, or Grand Marnier etc etc)

A winter vegetable souffle would be interesting.

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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Incidentally, this quiche was made with an Oil Crust since i'm too cowardly to make a proper pate brisee (not cowardly technique wise, I'm just afraid of so much saturated fat). The crust was a bit pale on the bottom and probably could have done with a blind baking before the ingredients went in. But the crust was tender and tasty and very easy to make.

Although I made a real pate brisee, not an oil crust, I would still say to blind bake it. It makes an amazing difference in the taste and texture of the crust. You want it nearly browned, not just set. Also, if you have two pie plates use one inside the other to keep the crust thin and crunchy. More room for custard. And, keep your fillings in check, also to have more room for custard. See Quiche thread.
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I'd be happy to do a souffle demo.

Any requests as to type/flavouring?

(cheese or chocolate, or veg or fruit puree, or Grand Marnier etc etc)

Chocolate. See, now you have to do all of them. We're pulling for you, Jack.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I'm sure there are people here who make better souffles, with flat tops...

However here is my rustic version. Very good it is too for a light lunch or supper.

Fantastically versatile recipe. You can use almost any filling or flavouring, sweet or savoury. Use the same mixture in a flat pan to make a roulade. Any souffle left cover can be left to deflate and go cold, then reheat in a sauce for a double cooked souffle.

Winter vegetable and cheese

Ingredients.

Left over veg Here sprouts and carrots

An egg per person

Grated cheese (this is cheddar and Parmesan)

Salt, pepper, butter

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Preheat the oven to 200C/400F. Souffles like bottom heat, so put in a baking stone if you have one.

Separate the eggs. Butter the ramekins well, and if you like put a "surprise" in them . Some ham or bacon would also go well if you eat them, or a cube of cheese, or for a sweet liquor souffle a cube of bread soaked in the liquor. Whiz the ingredients other than the egg white. Season well - all that flavour is going to be diluted by the egg foam.

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Beat the egg white to soft peaks. The puree and the egg white should be about the same stiffness, and roughly equal volume. Mix a little of the egg white into the puree to lighten it.

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Fold the rest of the egg white into the puree. Don't beat out all the air - its OK for some to be not fully mixed. Fill into the ramekins

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Tap to settle the mixture then run your finger round to clear the edge

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Put in the oven for 25 mins.

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Serve immediately. This deflated a bit while I was fiddling with the camera. Should be just runny in the centre.

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Enjoy!

You can use many different vegetable purees. Courgette is good in summer.

For a cheese souffle use a Bechamel (white) sauce

For sweet souffle add sugar, and coat the inside of the ramekin with sugar.

Fruit puree are good, or just a liquor, like Grand Marnier beaten with the egg yolk.

Chocolate is classic: melt the chocolate and beat with the egg yolks.

Edited by jackal10 (log)
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