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Do your food preferences make you an outcast in your own family or ethnic group?


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34 minutes ago, Duvel said:


Hmm ... for me that would just be headcheese with vinegar in it (as about half of the varieties of Sülze have here). I do not see the pickling aspect, that for me would involve some treatment/storage option for the final product. Or maybe I got lost in translation, as so often ...

Anxious to hear what @ElsieDwill contribute by way of explanation.  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

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2 hours ago, Anna N said:

. Since I think it’s extremely rude to answer a question addressed to another poster (unless it sits unanswered for days) let me first of all apologize to @ElsieD. I love head cheese so my curiosity was aroused with this question and I found myself falling down the rabbit hole. One of the places I landed was here!

 

3 hours ago, Duvel said:

 Could you explain the concept “pickled headcheese” ?

 

@Anna N's article explains it very well.  What I used to buy also had chopped pickles in it.

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17 hours ago, ElsieD said:

 

 

@Anna N's article explains it very well.  What I used to buy also had chopped pickles in it.


I did some research yesterday, and there is a regional dish from Swabia called “Saurer Pressack”, in which headcheese (typically two varieties, one “white” and one “red”, based on blood) are thinly sliced and marinated with vinegar, onions, oil & spices before served with rustic bread ...
 

 

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5 minutes ago, Duvel said:


Why ? It’s a type of blood sausage ...

I just got that complete aversion to anything with blood and then to combine it with head cheese...uh uh, no. You can have my share, thank you, Duvel.

Edited by Tropicalsenior (log)
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6 minutes ago, heidih said:

That tends to skeeve many Americans out.


Thanks - I was not aware of this being a general “thing”. Just checked: this article has a nice analysis ...

Edited by Duvel (log)
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7 minutes ago, heidih said:

hare w/ blood thickened sauce 

I'm not even going there.

I don't really care for rabbit but in some recipes it might be necessary. This is my favorite recipe for rabbit.

 

Elephant  Stew 

 

1  elephant 

salt  and  pepper  to  taste 

2  rabbits  (optional) 

brown  gravy 

 

Cut  elephant  into  bite  sized  pieces.    This  should  take  about  two  months.    Add  enough  brown  gravy  to cover.    Cook  over  a  kerosene  fire  at  465 degrees  for  about  4  weeks.    This  will  serve  about  3,800  people.    If  more  are expected,  two  rabbits  may  be  added,  but  do  this  only  if  necessary  as  most  people  do  not  like  to  find  hare  in  their stew.

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8 minutes ago, Duvel said:


Thanks - I was not aware of this being a general “thing”. Just checked: this article has a nice analysis ...

Yet strangely a romp through any of our dinner threads will reveal how much we North Americans enjoy rare red meat! Perhaps we convince ourselves that the puddle of red on the plate is cherry juice? I don’t know. I grew up with black pudding (blood sausage) as a Sunday treat but have not had any in some 60+ years. Not sure how I would react with some on my plate these days. 
 

But I want my lamb, my beef, and my duck breast to have had very little to do with heat. And I will happily mop up the juices. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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3 hours ago, Duvel said:


I did some research yesterday, and there is a regional dish from Swabia called “Saurer Pressack”, in which headcheese (typically two varieties, one “white” and one “red”, based on blood) are thinly sliced and marinated with vinegar, onions, oil & spices before served with rustic bread ...
 

 

 

Sounds good.  I'd happily eat it.

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2 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

Sounds good.  I'd happily eat it.


Agreed ! And I will in the upcoming week 🤗

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10 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Yet strangely a romp through any of our dinner threads will reveal how much we North Americans enjoy rare red meat! Perhaps we convince ourselves that the puddle of red on the plate is cherry juice? I don’t know. I grew up with black pudding (blood sausage) as a Sunday treat but have not had any in some 60+ years. Not sure how I would react with some on my plate these days. 
 

But I want my lamb, my beef, and my duck breast to have had very little to do with heat. And I will happily mop up the juices. 

 

We used to eat smoked eel when I was growing up, and I used to really like it.  And then, once I left home, I never ate it again.  Now when I see a piece of eel I am reminded of snake and the look of it turns me off.   I haven't eaten it in over 50 years and don't miss it.  It is a strange thing that sometimes what you ate and liked as a youngster becomes not so appetizing when you get older mainly I think, because you've gotten away from it.

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Just now, ElsieD said:

 

We used to eat smoked eel when I was growing up, and I used to really like it.  And then, once I left home, I never ate it again.  Now when I see a piece of eel I am reminded of snake and the look of it turns me off.   I haven't eaten it in over 50 years and don't miss it.  It is a strange thing that sometimes what you ate and liked as a youngster becomes not so appetizing when you get older mainly I think, because you've gotten away from it.

 

Scrapple.

 

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1 hour ago, Tropicalsenior said:

I looked it up on the internet and it actually isn't blood. It is this.

I think we are splitting hares. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I'm in my element in China where blood is rightly considered to be delicious and nutritional and far too valuable to waste. Also having been brought up in both Scottish and French cultures, I was exposed to blood from an early age and still eat it regularly.

 

862987660_Pigsblood.thumb.jpg.11af97b6934e1779f2070c7a4c3b9b47.jpg

Congealed pig blood for hotpot or soup

 

1448014390_cowsblood.thumb.jpg.08c828fdd20a398e2621dbd5f73d7cef.jpg

Duck Blood - Ditto

 

154393808_ChickenPigsBloodandTonkinJasmineSoup.thumb.jpg.e6a56ae0dccb4efd833cba779df54bb6.jpg

Pig's Blood in soup with chicken and Tonkin Jasmine

 

1949758595_HunanBloodSausage.thumb.jpg.9e98d271a2012f748810393edf53035e.jpg

Hunan Blood Sausage

 

787898725_bloodsausageandbeans.thumb.jpg.f1e001890277cdddc2a726113e093b44.jpg

Breakfast - Guangxi blood sausage, beans and fried egg.

 

1596807634_Stornowayblackpudding.thumb.jpg.9f70dd3c24a001d285824d17f85d20ac.jpg

Scottish Black Pudding

 

1481562352_Blackpuddingpoachedegg.thumb.jpg.6345028c37f5bf2b10e34039ce1ee418.jpg

Black pudding and poached egg.

 

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I'm in my element in China where blood is rightly considered to be delicious and nutritional and far too valuable to waste. Also having been brought up in both Scottish and French cultures, I was exposed to blood from an early age and still eat it regularly.

 

862987660_Pigsblood.thumb.jpg.11af97b6934e1779f2070c7a4c3b9b47.jpg

Congealed pig blood for hotpot or soup

 

1448014390_cowsblood.thumb.jpg.08c828fdd20a398e2621dbd5f73d7cef.jpg

Duck Blood - Ditto

 

154393808_ChickenPigsBloodandTonkinJasmineSoup.thumb.jpg.e6a56ae0dccb4efd833cba779df54bb6.jpg

Pig's Blood in soup with chicken and Tonkin Jasmine

 

1949758595_HunanBloodSausage.thumb.jpg.9e98d271a2012f748810393edf53035e.jpg

Hunan Blood Sausage

 

787898725_bloodsausageandbeans.thumb.jpg.f1e001890277cdddc2a726113e093b44.jpg

Breakfast - Guangxi blood sausage, beans and fried egg.

 

1596807634_Stornowayblackpudding.thumb.jpg.9f70dd3c24a001d285824d17f85d20ac.jpg

Scottish Black Pudding

 

1481562352_Blackpuddingpoachedegg.thumb.jpg.6345028c37f5bf2b10e34039ce1ee418.jpg

Black pudding and poached egg.

 

 

What does the Guanngxi sausage taste like? That looks like an excellent fry up!

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1 hour ago, Kerala said:

What does the Guanngxi sausage taste like? That looks like an excellent fry up!

 

The Guangxi sausage tastes almost exacctly like the Scottish one, but if you've never eaten that then that is useless information.

It is just pig's blood with rice and unidentified spices. I detect the porkiness with white pepper, fennel seed and cumin, but there are others.  It is fairly lightly spiced but nicely so. The Hunan sausages are seriously under seasoned. Little salt if any and almost no detectable spicing, but I can correct that to some extent in my preparations.

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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12 minutes ago, Kerala said:

Ah, I was hoping for a spicier alternative to black pudding.

 

No. It tastes just like black pudding - and that's OK by me! I can always spice it up myself.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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