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pastrygirl

Have you ever had a buttery?

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I was thinking "have I ever had a buttery what?"... :D ...and then I saw that it's not a buttery anything, it's just a buttery. So nope, never had a buttery. 

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Often. As a kid I would be packed off for the summer to live with cousins in Fife, where butteries are also eaten. Haven't had one in decades.

 

As I recall, they taste...well, buttery. But savoury. Not sweet like kouign-amann.

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The recipes I have in my older baking books are all made with a mixture of butter and lard (or just lard), and minimal or no sugar. One describes the dough as similar to a croissant but a different shape. The proportion of fat to flour is high in all of the recipes I could find.

 

 

 

 

 

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Serious Eats recipe

 

Uses some of the techniques one might associate with croissants but includes sugar. Intriguing. 

 

I also ran across a recipe by the Hairy Bikers which suggested serving them with jam?

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8 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I also ran across a recipe by the Hairy Bikers which suggested serving them with jam? 

 

Yes, very common.

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Someone should make them and report back.

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

Someone should make them and report back.

Someone?😂😂😂😂

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46 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Someone?😂😂😂😂


I enthusiastically searched a few recipes just to see what I would be getting into because I don't have a whole lot planned for today unless the rain moves out. And then I saw that I would be laminating dough and decided to file it away for fall or winter... or not at all. :D

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Posted (edited)

As it happened, today we went to the Ottawa Farmer's market and someone had a stall selling bread and various yeast based pastries.  And guess what - one of the items was a Scottish buttery.  Pictures below.  The last picture is a close-up of it as it sits on my counter.  They are very light.  This fellow says he used 4 parts butter to 1 of lard.  The only reason he uses lard is for flakiness.  He says back in Scotland they sell for 25 cents.  We also bought a cinnamon bun and a kouign aman.  Next time I plan on buying one of each of his buns, except for marzipan.  Much as I like almonds, marzipan is nasty.  

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Edited by ElsieD (log)
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 Quite an amazing coincidence.

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56 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 Quite an amazing coincidence.

 

Isn't it just.  I had never heard of them until this morning.  I read the recipe from Serious Eats which you linked to and thought, "I could try that" (sometime).  A bit later  we went to this particular market location for this first time in a couple of years and low and behold, there were the butteries.  Butterys?  I've wrapped it up and put it in the freezer and plan on making a shrimp salad sandwich with it later this week.. Should be good.  This market has improved a lot as there were many prepared foods for sale - momos with spicy tahini sauce (we had some  delicious), alfajores, arepas, and bimibap to name a few.  I think I'll be going back before another couple of years passes.

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@ElsieD that's so cool that you just happened to find them out in the wild!  And that @liuzhou ate them as a child; I knew someone here would have heard of them

 

The only other pastry that I think of as Scottish is shortbread, also heavy on the butter... I guess they must have some good butter over there ;)  I've never been to the UK, will have to see for myself someday.

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On 6/18/2018 at 12:14 AM, pastrygirl said:

@ElsieD that's so cool that you just happened to find them out in the wild!  And that @liuzhou ate them as a child; I knew someone here would have heard of them

 

The only other pastry that I think of as Scottish is shortbread, also heavy on the butter... I guess they must have some good butter over there ;)  I've never been to the UK, will have to see for myself someday.

 

If you haven't had a Scottish potato scone, you're missing out ;)

 

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7 minutes ago, jmacnaughtan said:

 

If you haven't had a Scottish potato scone, you're missing out ;)

 

 

I'm Scottish. but always thought they were Irish.

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Just now, liuzhou said:

 

I'm Scottish. but always thought they were Irish.

 

They do have them in Ireland, but I think they're called farls over there.

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3 minutes ago, jmacnaughtan said:

 

They do have them in Ireland, but I think they're called farls over there.

 

Although there are potato farls, they are not the same as potato scones. And there are many types of farls.

 

Anyway, nothing to do with butteries.

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That doesn't look anything like the one I bought or what I imagine the recipe from Serious Eats to look like.  Interesting.

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Now I'm intrigued by the notion of making potato scones, which sound much like the potato cakes I grew up eating, and still make when I have leftover mashed potatoes. But they're just round.

 

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

That doesn't look anything like the one I bought or what I imagine the recipe from Serious Eats to look like.  Interesting.

 

They look surprisingly ... rustic 😂  But I'd still eat one!

 

 

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8 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

They look surprisingly ... rustic 😂  But I'd still eat one!

 

 

They weren’t meant to be delicate. They were meant to go on sea voyages. :D

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Sounds like it would beat hardtack hands down.  A drizzle of lemon would take care of that pesky scurvy too!

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3 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

 

They look surprisingly ... rustic 😂  But I'd still eat one!

 

 

 

Just how I (wistfully) remember them.

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32 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Just how I (wistfully) remember them.

 

Are the butteries you remember eating flat like that?  Is there no yeast in them?

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