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Yard Sale, Thrift Store, Junk Heap Shopping (Part 3)


Tere
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1 minute ago, Cyberider said:

Looks like mine from the 1970's which is still going strong. 

The plug makes me think ’70s might be more accurate. I don’t remember when the switch to the polarized flanged plugs 🔌 occurred.156282CD-8433-4CC5-8DB4-1F5BC10835A6.thumb.jpeg.459ed52cece0edd3267ff368b6d82ac8.jpeg

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20 hours ago, DesertTinker said:

The plug makes me think ’70s might be more accurate. I don’t remember when the switch to the polarized flanged plugs 🔌 occurred.

I have a smaller cousin of your find, a Model SR-6E, purchased new in LA in 1980.  Has the same plug, though mine doesn't have the protective spring on the end that plugs into the machine. Also still works fine, though I tend to cook rice in the Instant Pot these days. 

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  • 1 month later...

Just in time for Halloween/All Saints/Samhain/Dia de la Muertos comes this wok cauldron.  $20.    It was cleaned and smoothed, so now seasoning starts.   Thing's a beast, 7" deep and about 24" wide.  

 

I had been looking for a discada, but this is just as good.   Playing with fire on the tao burner.

 

Before and During pics.

IMG_1041.jpg

IMG_1038.JPG

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The seasoning was finished with hoarded freezer pork fat that was rendered into chicharrons.   All this was an early morning patio endeavor, so I cracked a beer and stirred and sampled the chicharrons as the seasoning continued.

IMG_1043.jpg

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3 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

Found yesterday while out thrifting with Jessica:

1-IMG_0790.jpg.1bd5a8914552954081187d87c8cb2c00.jpg

These two covered serving dishes are Haviland Limoges France and coordinate with our wedding china.  They were $10 each!  I didn't really need them, but I couldn't pass them up.  

Nice. Now's the time to stock up on that kind of stuff, I guess, because a lot of it is going for dirt-cheap prices at estate sales (nobody wants granny's china anymore). In another 15-20 years, when tons of it has gone (sadly) to landfill, the pendulum will swing back and the hip young whatever-generation-after-Z kids will be buying it and driving the price back up.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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2 hours ago, chromedome said:

Nice. Now's the time to stock up on that kind of stuff, I guess, because a lot of it is going for dirt-cheap prices at estate sales (nobody wants granny's china anymore). In another 15-20 years, when tons of it has gone (sadly) to landfill, the pendulum will swing back and the hip young whatever-generation-after-Z kids will be buying it and driving the price back up.

 

So true.  There are a lot of country auctions and estate sales where I live, and I hear auctioneers complaining that they can't get rid of classic silver and highly decorated china.  People are paying more for modernist stainless steel flatware than for solid silverware.   Same with 19th century furniture.

 

 

 

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On 9/24/2022 at 7:48 AM, lemniscate said:

Just in time for Halloween/All Saints/Samhain/Dia de la Muertos comes this wok cauldron.  $20.    It was cleaned and smoothed, so now seasoning starts.   Thing's a beast, 7" deep and about 24" wide.  

 

I had been looking for a discada, but this is just as good.   Playing with fire on the tao burner.

 

Before and During pics.

IMG_1041.jpg

IMG_1038.JPG


There should be a "wow" button. 

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14 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

Found yesterday while out thrifting with Jessica:

1-IMG_0790.jpg.1bd5a8914552954081187d87c8cb2c00.jpg

These two covered serving dishes are Haviland Limoges France and coordinate with our wedding china.  They were $10 each!  I didn't really need them, but I couldn't pass them up.  

 

They are beautiful and a real steal.  Congrats!

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16 hours ago, chromedome said:

Nice. Now's the time to stock up on that kind of stuff, I guess, because a lot of it is going for dirt-cheap prices at estate sales (nobody wants granny's china anymore). In another 15-20 years, when tons of it has gone (sadly) to landfill, the pendulum will swing back and the hip young whatever-generation-after-Z kids will be buying it and driving the price back up.

You're right.  I have 3 sets of silver because I'm the only one in the family that likes it and is willing to polish it.   One of the places we went to yesterday had a whole set of Limoges china (not my pattern) dirt cheap.  Hard to see people going crazy over 1970s crap and donating their parents' high quality stuff to Goodwill.  

Edited by Kim Shook (log)
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On 10/5/2022 at 6:00 PM, chromedome said:

Nice. Now's the time to stock up on that kind of stuff, I guess, because a lot of it is going for dirt-cheap prices at estate sales (nobody wants granny's china anymore).

Reading the Forbes article Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff gave my Sweetie, me and other family members good insight when we cleaned out his parents house. There were specific things from the kitchen that My Sweetie and I wanted; no pictures - most of our kitchen is packed up since we're moving soon. My MIL had a large cookbook collection, and family only wanted a few of them. Our daughters didn't want the Lenox that had been handed to us by a great-uncle. We found a niece that did so they will be kept in the family. We've instructed our daughters that when we die to go through the house for anything they want then have a professional estate sale company liquidate the rest.

 

It has been very hard to resist going thrift shopping or stopping at yard sales but we've lived 38 years in the house we're packing up and don't need to add to what we will be moving. Thrift stores and yard sales will again happen once we're in our new home, which hopefully will be before Thanksgiving. I still have a few previous thrift store finds to deal with including pre-1960 CI pans to restore, and a few knives to restore.

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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3 hours ago, Porthos said:

Reading the Forbes article Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff gave my Sweetie, me and other family members good insight when we cleaned out his parents house.

 

Wow, that article was eye-opening -- and kind of depressing.

 

“For the first time in history of the world, two generations are downsizing simultaneously,” says Buysse, talking about the boomers’ parents (sometimes, the final downsizing) and the boomers themselves. “I have a 90-year-old parent who wants to give me stuff or, if she passes away, my siblings and I will have to clean up the house. And my siblings and I are 60 to 70 and we’re downsizing.”

This, it seems, is 21st-century life — and death. “I don’t think there is a future” for the possessions of our parents’ generation, says Eppel. “It’s a different world.”

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Speaking of Grandma's China, I was just browsing the offerings on the auction site of Goodwill Stores of the Pacific Northwest, and the old Pyrex items are bringing higher prices than fine china. 

 

I like Pyrex just fine as a utilitarian kitchen item, but I don't think its decorative qualities are enough to justify the outrageous prices it's bringing for the past few years:

 

https://shopgoodwill.com/categories/listing?st=pyrex&sg=Keyword&c=62&s=&lp=0&hp=999999&sbn=&spo=false&snpo=false&socs=false&sd=false&sca=false&caed=10%2F9%2F2022&cadb=7&scs=false&sis=false&col=4&p=1&ps=40&desc=true&ss=0&UseBuyerPrefs=true&sus=false&cln=2&catIds=-1,20,62&pn=&wc=false&mci=false&hmt=false&layout=grid&ihp=

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18 hours ago, CookBot said:

Speaking of Grandma's China, I was just browsing the offerings on the auction site of Goodwill Stores of the Pacific Northwest, and the old Pyrex items are bringing higher prices than fine china. 

 

I like Pyrex just fine as a utilitarian kitchen item, but I don't think its decorative qualities are enough to justify the outrageous prices it's bringing for the past few years:

 

https://shopgoodwill.com/categories/listing?st=pyrex&sg=Keyword&c=62&s=&lp=0&hp=999999&sbn=&spo=false&snpo=false&socs=false&sd=false&sca=false&caed=10%2F9%2F2022&cadb=7&scs=false&sis=false&col=4&p=1&ps=40&desc=true&ss=0&UseBuyerPrefs=true&sus=false&cln=2&catIds=-1,20,62&pn=&wc=false&mci=false&hmt=false&layout=grid&ihp=

Yep.  I belong to some vintage and thrifting groups on FB and am constantly astounded at the things that the younger folks (I'm 63) are thrilled to find - Corningware, 1970s "art" glass, all manner of 1970s harvest gold/avocado/mushroom-themed kitchen decor, etc.  

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  • 2 weeks later...
1 hour ago, Senior Sea Kayaker said:

Picked this up for $2 Cdn.  Wantred a copy for awhile.

 

A wonderful food writer whose books hold up beautifully.  I also loved the huge 28-volume encyclopedia Olney did for Time-Life in the '70s, The Good Cook.  I remember that the volume on "Terrines, Pates, and Galantines" was the first really fancy French food I ever attempted.

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11 minutes ago, CookBot said:

 

A wonderful food writer whose books hold up beautifully.  I also loved the huge 28-volume encyclopedia Olney did for Time-Life in the '70s, The Good Cook.  I remember that the volume on "Terrines, Pates, and Galantines" was the first really fancy French food I ever attempted.

Agreed. I used to occasionally run across some of those volumes at garage sales and in used bookstores. Should have picked them up.

 

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5 hours ago, Senior Sea Kayaker said:

Agreed. I used to occasionally run across some of those volumes at garage sales and in used bookstores. Should have picked them up.

 

 

I am fortunate to have purchased the full set on subscription.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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6 hours ago, Senior Sea Kayaker said:

Agreed. I used to occasionally run across some of those volumes at garage sales and in used bookstores. Should have picked them up.

 

 

I started the subscription when I got my first job but quickly realized they were too expensive for my budget.  Over the years, I've picked up some in used bookshops and more recently via online used booksellers.  My collection currently stands at 20 volumes. 

 

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2 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I started the subscription when I got my first job but quickly realized they were too expensive for my budget.  Over the years, I've picked up some in used bookshops and more recently via online used booksellers.  My collection currently stands at 20 volumes.

 

Yes, they weren't cheap once you got past the initial come-on discount.  My mother bought a subscription for me as a gift, and at one time I had them all, but have lost about half of them in cross-country moves, unreturned loan-outs, etc.  I still refer occasionally to the poultry and pastry volumes.

 

That series, and Jacques Pepin's "Art of Cooking" volumes, were the earliest examples I recall of step-by-step photography of technique (in color).  Pepin's earlier "La Technique" and "La Method" were superior in instruction, but the B&W photos were very poor, by comparison.

 

 

3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I am fortunate to have purchased the full set on subscription.

 

You are fortunate!  I'll bet a full set of those brings a pretty penny on eBay these days.  I know the times I've tried to get a volume or two of the Time-Life "Foods of the World" series, I was surprised at the prices of mint volumes.  (The 5 volumes of regional American cooking from that series are excellent, with writing by James Beard, MFK Fisher, and their ilk.)

 

1981 TV ad for The Good Cook book series:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y20IwvykTgE

 

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