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Gardening: 2016 (midyear)


ElainaA
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This past week, I managed to revive several sweet potato plants. Added in approx. 150 beans. Half  are yellow Galopka, and the other half green Cantare.  I had started some broccoli over here at the condo, then took them over to the house to transplant. They seems to be doing well. The yellow squashies, zukes, pumpkins, hubbards, and who knows what else (my labels blurred in the rain), are fantastic.  The tomatoes seems to be thriving alongside the Mediterranean oregano.

I also added in 29 hills of potatoes, 40 feet of Oxtail carrots,10 hills of Spaghetti squash., and some unknown amount of Blacktail Mountain watermelon plants. (Its a 70 day watermelon I've had some success with up here.)   The fun will come when I have to roto till again and put in the corn. All this rain makes the weeds grow exponentially.  Once I nix those, I will add in some greens- like spinach, lettuces and cabbages. 

   The house is coming along well, now. Most of the signs of fire damage are gone- just a little bit left in the garage.  So, I should be able to grow some things inside on the porch once they drywall, I tile, and get a door put on the front of the house. Most of the siding is on. They are waiting on some trim pieces to arrive, and then they will finish the gables.  I'm just anxious to get my indoor garden going too!  This porch has in-floor heat, and I will use slate to tile with. Hoping that the heat will come through well enough to keep roots warm in the winter, should I set the pots directly on the floor. 

   Once this rain/mist stops, I have to sprinkle everything again with diatomaceous earth---and kill off all those little potato bugs before they get going.  Love that stuff. 

 

Shelby- you might want to get some of that and sprinkle on your plants. To us, the powder feels like baby powder; to a squishy bug, its like razors cutting their bellies up as they squish along.   An old parmesan cheese container is handy for sprinkling. Never get it in your eyes. I was on Prednisone for 5 days- after an "ooops" with that stuff. O.o

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-Andrea

 

A 'balanced diet' means chocolate in BOTH hands. :biggrin:

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1 minute ago, blue_dolphin said:

@HungryChris, how did you cook your sugar snaps?  On the grill?  Or roasted or broiled?   They look really good. 

Just a splash of olive oil, salt & pepper in a non stick fry pan on medium high flame, stirring constantly. It took about 3 minutes.

HC

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19 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

@HungryChris, how did you cook your sugar snaps?  On the grill?  Or roasted or broiled?   They look really good. 

 

19 hours ago, HungryChris said:

Just a splash of olive oil, salt & pepper in a non stick fry pan on medium high flame, stirring constantly. It took about 3 minutes.

HC

 

I do it as a "covered-partial-steamed-stir-fry" thing. REALLY hot pan/wok (NOT non-stick) w/ really hot oil (at smoking point) (I never use olive oil for this - I use something less "greasy", rice bran/peanut/corn/etc) some salt sprinkled in, then dampened (washed) snow peas or sugar snap peas or even just green beans bunged in and the wok/pan covered IMMEDIATELY. (I usually put the damp peas/beans in the bowl of the lid, invert into the pan/wok, and immediately slam on the lid) Wait 10-20 secs or so (explosions and vigorous popping will be heard; if you have never done this before you will be greatly alarmed), holding down the lid if needed, then shake and semi-toss the pan/wok w/ contents with the lid on and holding it down with one hand while shaking the pan with the other. Wait 20-30 secs more, open the lid, stir around w/ a spatula, splash in a little water if needed. cover briefly again if warranted. Serve. The stuff is usually nicely semi-charred like in HC's pic and with some wok-hei imbued as well. Crunch, crunch.

Edited by huiray (log)
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Thanks, @huiray!  I'll try your method next. 

 

27 minutes ago, huiray said:

explosions and vigorous popping will be heard; if you have never done this before you will be greatly alarmed

Indeed this happened when I added the just washed peas to the hot oil following @HungryChris's method.  My feline kitchen monitor was well and truly alarmed :o!

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Help ! What's killing the snow pea seedlings ?

 

We started with about 20 of these from seed. Two nights ago five disappeared. The gardener sprayed the remaining seedlings with pyrethrum. Last night another 11 went missing. The whole plant is gone, roots and all. Here's photos of the remaining three seedlings, and one that has been uprooted but left.

 

I don't think it's the dogs, there's lattice that deters them.

 

I fear the last three will meet their demise tonight...thoughts ?

image.jpegimage.jpeg

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During my enforced absence from the garden, which is now just about taken over by grass, the damn rabbits ate the green beans again. I give up. Liquid Fence is not worth the $24.95 I paid for it. No more green beans until next year, when I can put a fence up.

 

Crabgrass is also prolific in the squash/cucumber bed, though I'd thought the spreading vines and leaves would shade it out. No such. Have been getting a few zucchini and yellow squash. Cucumbers, which are supposed to be pickling cucumbers, are turning out to be little globes, but very cucumber-y. 

 

Big tomatoes are not bearing much at all, but cherries and Romas are pretty prolific.

 

I have graduated from crutches and knee brace, now in just an ankle brace I can wear with tennis shoes. My ordered cane arrives tomorrow (have threatened the children that the first one to tease me about it, I will use it to whack them soundly), and once it's here, I'm journeying to the garden. Probably to weep, as I won't be able to do much but survey the damage.

 

Thank God for sturdy tomatoes!

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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1 hour ago, kayb said:

During my enforced absence from the garden, which is now just about taken over by grass, the damn rabbits ate the green beans again. I give up. Liquid Fence is not worth the $24.95 I paid for it. No more green beans until next year, when I can put a fence up.

 

Crabgrass is also prolific in the squash/cucumber bed, though I'd thought the spreading vines and leaves would shade it out. No such. Have been getting a few zucchini and yellow squash. Cucumbers, which are supposed to be pickling cucumbers, are turning out to be little globes, but very cucumber-y. 

 

Big tomatoes are not bearing much at all, but cherries and Romas are pretty prolific.

 

I have graduated from crutches and knee brace, now in just an ankle brace I can wear with tennis shoes. My ordered cane arrives tomorrow (have threatened the children that the first one to tease me about it, I will use it to whack them soundly), and once it's here, I'm journeying to the garden. Probably to weep, as I won't be able to do much but survey the damage.

 

Thank God for sturdy tomatoes!

 

Damn rabbits.  No beans for me either this year.  You and I will prevail on those next year, I just know it.

 

I wonder if your cukes need a bit more water?  Mine get globe like when that happens......

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@kayb   Would something like this help:  http://www.gardeners.com/buy/garden-tools/garden-kneelers/   It reverses to be either a kneeler (out for you, I realize) or a seat. They have other types of seats for gardening - I covet the one on wheels - but this is the one I have. Not cheap but mine has held up for at least 5-6 years.

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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1 hour ago, ElainaA said:

@kayb   Would something like this help:  http://www.gardeners.com/buy/garden-tools/garden-kneelers/   It reverses to be either a kneeler (out for you, I realize) or a seat. They have other types of seats for gardening - I covet the one on wheels - but this is the one I have. Not cheap but mine has held up for at least 5-6 years.

That's a thought. I hate to get one for as small as my garden is, and with the knee messed up, I can't kneel, but the seat might work. Then again, I may just muddle through this year and try again next year!

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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10 hours ago, sartoric said:

There's no prints, paw or claw. The gardener seems to think mice, I dunno.

Suspect the final damage will be evident by daylight. I need to set up a camera...

 

What a mystery. I'm intrigued. Pls keep us posted.

 

I hate to admit to extensive experience with rodents--really, I have lived in decent housing all my life--but the mice and rats and squirrels I've known do not like their green veggies. They go for the luscious stuff like tomatoes, nuts, and fruit.

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I admit that I grow a ridiculous amount of lettuce - mainly because I like variety and am easily seduced by seed catalogs in February. I actually grow more of lots of things than we can consume. The good part is there is lots to give away. The Episcopal church in Cortland (the nearest large town) sponsors a Loaves and Fishes program - a free meal daily for anyone who shows up. They cannot accept home processed food but are delighted to get fresh garden produce. So, today I thinned out one of the lettuce beds, washed it all and tomorrow I'll drop it off.

DSC01284.jpg

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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1 hour ago, djyee100 said:

 

What a mystery. I'm intrigued. Pls keep us posted.

 

I hate to admit to extensive experience with rodents--really, I have lived in decent housing all my life--but the mice and rats and squirrels I've known do not like their green veggies. They go for the luscious stuff like tomatoes, nuts, and fruit.

I think the gardener might have been right. He upended a plastic container over the three remaining plants last night, they're still there this morning. At least I stopped him putting a rat trap behind the pot, it's a favourite spot for one of the doggies....

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59 minutes ago, huiray said:

 

...and I see a spiking Phalaenopsis...  :-) ... the spike of which might be appreciated by some critters running around the place too.

Indeed, it's a lovely orchid. It was given to me about eight years ago by a client after he stiffed me on a lunch date. Every winter it spells downstairs in the garden, then comes back to the deck when it's flowering. 

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27 minutes ago, ElainaA said:

I admit that I grow a ridiculous amount of lettuce - mainly because I like variety and am easily seduced by seed catalogs in February. I actually grow more of lots of things than we can consume. The good part is there is lots to give away. The Episcopal church in Cortland (the nearest large town) sponsors a Loaves and Fishes program - a free meal daily for anyone who shows up. They cannot accept home processed food but are delighted to get fresh garden produce. So, today I thinned out one of the lettuce beds, washed it all and tomorrow I'll drop it off.

DSC01284.jpg

What a great feeling that must give you ! Well done.

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