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ElainaA

Gardening: 2016 (midyear)

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51 minutes ago, ElainaA said:

I admit that I grow a ridiculous amount of lettuce - mainly because I like variety and am easily seduced by seed catalogs in February. I actually grow more of lots of things than we can consume. The good part is there is lots to give away. The Episcopal church in Cortland (the nearest large town) sponsors a Loaves and Fishes program - a free meal daily for anyone who shows up. They cannot accept home processed food but are delighted to get fresh garden produce. So, today I thinned out one of the lettuce beds, washed it all and tomorrow I'll drop it off.

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Blanch them & drizzle with a sauce. Stir-fry them. Do fried rice with them. Put them in soupy dishes. Their volume will decrease markedly in all cases. :-) 

Why not harvest them as whole plants? Like what one gets in farmers' markets and the groceries? That should winnow out the number of plants forthwith.

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27 minutes ago, huiray said:

 

Blanch them & drizzle with a sauce. Stir-fry them. Do fried rice with them. Put them in soupy dishes. Their volume will decrease markedly in all cases. :-) 

Why not harvest them as whole plants? Like what one gets in farmers' markets and the groceries? That should winnow out the number of plants forthwith.

I could do all that and still have lots left over. In our house we are salad addicts. I know there are lots of other ways to use lettuce but that is what we like. But  my purpose in planting so much is to have lots to give away. (And there is still a ridiculous amount left.)

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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16 hours ago, kayb said:

During my enforced absence from the garden, which is now just about taken over by grass...

 

Kayb.

I feel your pain! After recent eye surgery, I was told "No physical exercise of any kind and no bending."  Well, at 6' 5", going into the garden without bending, simply means, go in there, survey the damage, and do nothing. How hard is that?

 I have to admit that I have "bent" the rules just a bit, but please, don't tell anyone!

I have weeds invading the weeds! I have an appointment on Friday and hope I am given the go ahead to bend or break the rules a bit more.

I share your views on tomato plants. Mine have just been troopers, but do need a helping hand that I am hoping to be given the green light for on Friday.

HC 

 

 


Edited by HungryChris semantics (log)
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Thought that was a wooly pig in the first photo    :)

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Its good to have Morels

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On 24 June 2016 at 1:40 AM, KennethT said:

A Tale of Two Coriander (Book II):

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Never heard of the variety pictured left until now, does anyone know if it has the same flavour as the better known variety pictured right?  Will be searching for some seeds, we do grow the more usual coriander but find that it bolts easily and that it isn't too weather resistant. The alternative looks to be perhaps sturdier as a plant.

 

@Shelby it is most inspirational to read how you have worked to recover your garden after the storms.  I've been moaning lately because we aren't having much of a summer here but compared to your area we have been extremely fortunate.  Having read all of your posts in this thread I'm going to stop the moaning, get outside and pull weeds!  It is, after all, an easier task when the earth isn't baked dry.  

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I find the flavor of sawtooth to be stronger and just different, but I like it better for many applications.  I got seeds from Evergreen seeds... But beware, it takes a notoriously long time to germinate.

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5 minutes ago, DianaB said:

Never heard of the variety pictured left until now, does anyone know if it has the same flavour as the better known variety pictured right?

 

@DianaB, I made some comments here.  Also in this thread earlier.

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15 minutes ago, DianaB said:

 

Never heard of the variety pictured left until now, does anyone know if it has the same flavour as the better known variety pictured right?  Will be searching for some seeds, we do grow the more usual coriander but find that it bolts easily and that it isn't too weather resistant. The alternative looks to be perhaps sturdier as a plant.

 

@Shelby it is most inspirational to read how you have worked to recover your garden after the storms.  I've been moaning lately because we aren't having much of a summer here but compared to your area we have been extremely fortunate.  Having read all of your posts in this thread I'm going to stop the moaning, get outside and pull weeds!  It is, after all, an easier task when the earth isn't baked dry.  

Diana, thank you so much!  I feel very very blessed that it's come back halfway decent.  When I get a chance I'll post some pics of right after the storm as compared to now.  It was too depressing earlier lol.

 

You're so right about the weeds.  I always wait until I've watered or we've had a good rain.  We have a huge chance for some downpours (nohainohailnohailnohailnohail) beginning this afternoon so I'll probably spend tomorrow morn. pulling.  

 

I know it was everyone's positivity here that helped my poor bedraggled plants come back :) 

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Freshly dug potatoes are a thing of beauty.  Cooked up the half eaten ones first. 

The helper was after the mole.  He used his nose to move the dirt....note the dirt on top of his head.  He found the nest but no animal.  It was amazing because after about an hour you couldn't really tell he had been digging. The mole's nest was right under a plant which had no potatoes left.  That must be one fat little mole!

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Started thinking last night that I could go into the garden with the hoe and do a little weeding without bending down and gave it a try this morning. I was able to improve things a bit. Normally, I either pinch off the shoots or guide them up inside the hoops, but a few days of neglect and there are way too many renegades that will need to be brought under control. I had to resist the urge to pick a few for fried green tomatoes with crab meat (an absolute favorite of ours from a recent visit to New Orleans). I wish I could buy some green tomatoes, but that is a fall item around here.

HC

IMG_1150.JPG

 

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Me too! I have some sad little plantlings. I think sowing under glass or buying seedlings is definitely the way to go next year. 

 

I should pull up the bolted rocket and make some braised greens a la Francaise (ish) but it's raining and I don't wanna. Maybe for lunch tomorrow. Vegetarian friend coming for the weekend so I reckon the rest of the salad leaves can survive till then. She may get some braised thinnings of stuff, too :D

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2 hours ago, Tere said:

 

 

I should pull up the bolted rocket and make some braised greens a la Francaise (ish) but it's raining and I don't wanna. Maybe for lunch tomorrow. Vegetarian friend coming for the weekend so I reckon the rest of the salad leaves can survive till then. She may get some braised thinnings of stuff, too :D

HA! My arugula (rocket) has bolted too. And I am also procrastinating in pulling it. The spinach and mizuna have also bolted. Tomorrow's job...... maybe.

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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@ElainaA, I'm so happy you do this with your excess produce! I have a soft spot in my heart for hunger ministries of all kinds. Way to go!

 

@HungryChris, I did make it out there and picked tomatoes and cucumbers. Am ordering some black plastic to put down between rows and plants and smother out the damn bermuda. Better'n nothing. Hope you get good news and some restrictions lifted at your doctor visit -- but please don't bend too many rules! Eyesight (like mobility) is not something with which to take chances!

 

@Shelby, definitely next  year for green beans! And barbecued rabbit.... So glad your garden is recovering somewhat. Good to hear you'll have Silver Queen. I've just learned my annual jaunt to a conference in N. GA, where I generally buy my Silver Queen on the way home, has been called off >:(, so I guess I'll make do with the ubiquitous Peaches and Cream, which is good stuff, but it ain't Silver Queen.

 

Garden squash and tomato-cucumber salad tonight!

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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This yr..  I'm removing..  all suckers in my Tomato plants!!

 

5 varieties of tomatoes/ 8 peppers / Kalette seeds / 2 Rhubarbs

27404824974_1bf4bf6ba0_k.jpg

 

I do like Herb     s

 

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Its good to have Morels

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This weekend I'm entertaining a strict vegetarian friend. I see garden salads in my future :) Frittata for lunch tomorrow probably with salads from the garden, pizza on the Kamado Joe in the evening (with salads from the garden). Veggie cooked breakfast in the morning (with scrambled egg and chives, probably). Spinach and pine nut risotto with wilted greens and thinnings in the evening. See a theme? :D 

 

(I would have cooked more adventurous things but she is not a foodie and doesn't do spicy at all. So I made sure all cheeses were vegetarian and went for something tasty and simple).

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1 hour ago, Tere said:

This weekend I'm entertaining a strict vegetarian friend. I see garden salads in my future :) Frittata for lunch tomorrow probably with salads from the garden, pizza on the Kamado Joe in the evening (with salads from the garden). Veggie cooked breakfast in the morning (with scrambled egg and chives, probably). Spinach and pine nut risotto with wilted greens and thinnings in the evening. See a theme? :D 

 

(I would have cooked more adventurous things but she is not a foodie and doesn't do spicy at all. So I made sure all cheeses were vegetarian and went for something tasty and simple).

We are not vegetarian but I do meat-less dinners 2-3 times a week. Usually risottos or pastas. There are lots of great options. The dinner I posted last night on the dinners thread was really good - orzo cooked as risotto with garlic scapes, mushrooms and spinach/arugula. (use your bolting rocket/arugula)

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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I have a plan (and indeed cooked vegetarian solely for a few years thanks to a vegetarian boyfriend. I am I guess mourning getting to play with my current cuisines (lebanese, Indian, Mexican). I think it's tasty food (the risotto I am planning is excellent and pizza and cooked breakfast is never a miss) but it's not stretchy. She will appreciate the effort and I hope like it. That is the main thing. The veggy alternatives to pepperoni, bacon and sausages I have sourced are more to do with pleasing the meat eaters. so it goes :) )

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Some garden pictures:

These are my experimental dwarf tomatoes. They seem to be doing very well so far.

DSC01298.jpg

Fennel, basil and radicchio. Need to cut the basil soon - basil/garlic scape pesto to freeze!

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The tomatoes in the greenhouse. I am pruning the indeterminate varieties but probably not as assiduously as I should. They are half again as tall as the tomatoes in the outside garden.

DSC01293.jpg

 

Leeks and onions.

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And a red romaine lettuce that managed to plant itself among the endive.

DSC01307.jpg

 

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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This was supposed to be part of my above post.

These beans are supposed to be Tongue of Fire - beans for drying, that, in everything I can find about them (I have never grown them before) are bush beans. Yet the plants are looking more and more like pole beans - thrashing around for something to climb on. So, either these are atypical Tongue of Fire beans or the seeds were mislabelled. Tomorrow i am putting in some poles and trellis for them to climb. And, in time, I will see what I have.

DSC01305.jpg


Edited by ElainaA (log)
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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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Wow, that red foliage looks amazing.  I have greens envey.  Most of mine is done due to the hot weather even under a shade cloth.  I will try some more in mid August when it is cooler.

great looking garden.  I don't see a comfortable chair over looking your patch from where you can marvel at it's glory in the morning with coffee in hand.  I have such a set up and love my morning survey of what's going on in the garden.

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On 29 June 2016 at 1:04 PM, sartoric said:

Help ! What's killing the snow pea seedlings ?

 

We started with about 20 of these from seed. Two nights ago five disappeared. The gardener sprayed the remaining seedlings with pyrethrum. Last night another 11 went missing. The whole plant is gone, roots and all. Here's photos of the remaining three seedlings, and one that has been uprooted but left.

 

I don't think it's the dogs, there's lattice that deters them.

 

I fear the last three will meet their demise tonight...thoughts ?

image.jpegimage.jpeg

 

The handyman made this today, see how you like that you doity rats !

image.jpeg

 

 

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11 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

 

great looking garden.  I don't see a comfortable chair over looking your patch from where you can marvel at it's glory in the morning with coffee in hand.  I have such a set up and love my morning survey of what's going on in the garden.

Actually I get a pretty good view from the gazebo behind out house. It looks straight down the hill to the garden. 9_9

We've had some hot weather here (well, hot for this area - high 80's, a few 90's (F)) and it is VERY dry. Some of my greens - arugula, spinach, mizuna, Persian cress - have bolted. But When I choose my lettuce varieties I try to get ones that are tolerant of heat. I usually have useable lettuce into August. 


Edited by ElainaA (log)
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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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