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How can i will improve my cooking skill


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One dish at a time. Tell us about a dish you made that you were not happy with and I'm sure we will try to help you out.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Be bold; don't fear making mistakes (but be sure to have a backup plan if you're cooking for company!).

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

"Imagine all the food you have eaten in your life and consider that you are simply some of that food, rearranged."  -Max Tegmark, physicist

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

 

"...in the mid-’90s when the internet was coming...there was a tendency to assume that when all the world’s knowledge comes online, everyone will flock to it. It turns out that if you give everyone access to the Library of Congress, what they do is watch videos on TikTok."  -Neil Stephenson, author, in The Atlantic

 

"In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual." -Galileo Galilei, physicist and astronomer

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Get a hunk of beef, taste it. Stick the meat in a fire for a bit, taste it. Sprinkle on some salt, taste it. Toss on some fresh herbs, taste it. Just like that, you've improved your cooking by 300 percent and got the basics down. Run with it. Cooking isn't hard, don't let anybody convince you otherwise. Even fancy high-end cooking isn't hard at home. In a restaurant is a different story, at least initially, because there is more involved than just being able to cook and plate food nicely. But even that isn't too bad once you get used to it. It mainly requires developing speed, timing and consistency... which come with practice/experience.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I've always said that anybody that can read can cook. You don't say where you are but my suggestion is that you decide what type/style/region of food most interests you and buy a good simple basic cookbook in that cuisine. Then sit down and read through it. It's a certainty that some of the recipes will pique your interest more than others, so select one that does and start off.

Many people have begun by taking a few cooking classes. If I were you, I'd check to see if any are offered in your area.

And for backup and encouragement, I'd try to find a mentor - a friend or family member that enjoys cooking and is good at it to be there for camaraderie and to help you along if you get stuck or discouraged.

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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You will make some mistakes along the journey to becoming a good cook, but that's just an integral part of any learning experience. The key is to not let that discourage you.

 

I remember serving raw chicken when I was nine and had to learn to cook after my mother died. There were tears involved, but I threw it back into the still hot oven, and we had delicious herbed roasted chicken that night anyway. There wasn't even a single cookbook in the house at the time, and I had gotten the verbal recipe from an older Italian neighbor who said cook it until it's golden and "done". No meat thermometer available either.

 

Some culinary boo boos won't be fixable, so the ingredients may go to waste as inedible. This happens occasionally even for experienced cooks. Don't let it faze you. With time and experience, you can make food to please yourself and your family and friends.

 

I knew an old boy who told me his daddy used to say, "If you're not making mistakes, it means you're not doing anything."

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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And for backup and encouragement, I'd try to find a mentor - a friend or family member that enjoys cooking and is good at it to be there for camaraderie and to help you along if you get stuck or discouraged.

 

This - if there is someone who makes something you like, ask them to show you how to make it, then practice it yourself until you make it like you like it.  Observe cooking wherever you see it - restaurants, other people's homes, the hot dog cart, etc. See what people are doing and observe the results - can you duplicate them?  I started learning to branch out when I realized that the frozen stir-fry kits I was buying were just chopped vegetables and frozen bottled sauce with the addition of sliced chicken breast.  The next step was chopping my own fresh vegetables and buying my own sauce. Then making my own sauce, etc...

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these days its easy to watch great chefs/cooks on line

 

I suggest Jacque Pepin. nothing very difficult here but tasty

 

http://www.kqed.org/w/morefastfoodmyway/episodes.html

 

lots and lots of cooking of this quality is now online.

 

there is lots of junk online too.  you will get to know the difference soon enough

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Einstein is quoted as having said "'Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.'"

 

I blush to think of the total screw-ups I've made (some recently) but I usually fight back, try to work out what went wrong and climb back on the horse again.

To improve your cooking, think cooking al the time. Read, watch, smell, taste  And above all question. Why? How? Why not?

And pay attention. My late wife was a terrible cook. She would admit so. But she only really had one problem. She would forget she was cooking and wander off to something else  - until the smoke alarm went off. Or there was the time the extended family (Chinese) sat down to a twelve course lunch and she had forgotten to cook any rice! Sacrilege!

 

One last point I would make. Sometimes simplest is best. It doesn't have to be fancy.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

"No amount of evidence will ever persuade an idiot"
Mark Twain

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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We've laid out some great suggestions in general here but really now the OP should tell us more about his situation other than a single post. Doesn't know how to boil water? Or an experienced cook and feeling stuck in a rut with no improvement and moments of self doubt...? People complaining about the cooking perhaps.

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We've laid out some great suggestions in general here but really now the OP should tell us more about his situation other than a single post. Doesn't know how to boil water? Or an experienced cook and feeling stuck in a rut with no improvement and moments of self doubt...? People complaining about the cooking perhaps.

I'm pretty sure this was a drive-by fooding... I'll be surprised if you hear anything more from him in this thread.

 

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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