Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Bread Topic (2014 –2015)


Shelby
 Share

Recommended Posts

King ofBaugette;  Honestly, the challenges you have gotten hasnt really taken you out of you comfort zone.  Wheat is a pretty easy  flour to work with.  I dare you to make a rye loaf, you can get my recipe for a mature  rye loaf, takes five days to make, but worth it.

  • Like 1

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

image.jpg

A little short and stubby for true baguettes because I was limited somewhat by my equipment. But I heard they were delicious, nevertheless.

  • Like 9

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

King ofBaugette; Honestly, the challenges you have gotten hasnt really taken you out of you comfort zone. Wheat is a pretty easy flour to work with. I dare you to make a rye loaf, you can get my recipe for a mature rye loaf, takes five days to make, but worth it.

I believe, all the suggestions I've received will keep me well occupied for a while. I plan on doing everything suggested. You guys are great!!!

Right now.. [emoji53] back to bed. Woke up with the flu [emoji40]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never manage to make a  no knead bread that  is delicous , I have follow the instruction and  the bread is stale one day after or in worse cases   2 hours after slicing it and also the  crust is like leather.  

 

Have you made the NY Times No-Knead Bread?

 

It is a lean French-style white bread, made in a boule, with a thin crispy crust and excellent aroma. The method is unusual, and probably not like other no-knead breads you may have tried. I baked this bread extensively for awhile, and afterwards I felt I learned a great deal about slow fermentation and wet doughs. That's why I recommend it as part of a baker's repertoire.

 

The EGullet thread about NY Times No-Knead Bread, which goes on and on. This thread garnered attention in the NY Times and

Jeffrey Steingarten's article about NY Times No-Knead Bread in Vogue.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/95345-minimalist-no-knead-bread-technique-part-1/

EGulleters did an incredible amount of experimentation and testing on this bread. Such creativity!

 

ETA: I was browsing through the EGullet thread and noticed that people recommended more salt in the recipe, myself included. I use 1 1/2 tsp salt in the basic recipe.

Edited by djyee100 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes I have and  that one just made holes and a leather crust for me. It could be because  I have domed lid on my  pot. If I ever get a flat one I will try again.

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And kneading isnt that hard and good exercise or you can use a machine to do it.

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

auv 001 small.jpg

 

Mistake or masterpiece?

 

auv 002 small.jpg

 

Bit of both?

 

auv 003 small.jpg

 

This is a French auvergnat. Problem is you're supposed to push two fingers through the centre of of the dough like an English cottage loaf just before it goes in the oven. Guess who forgot?

 

Mick

  • Like 9

Mick Hartley

The PArtisan Baker

bethesdabakers

"I can give you more pep than that store bought yeast" - Evolution Mama (don't you make a monkey out of me)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My bread is getting better.  I was quite proud of these:

 

Batard and boule.jpg

 

Lean straight white batard; Mick's country sourdough boule.  My dinner guests were as pleased as I.

 

Then last night, I turned out these:

 

Sourdough baguettes overrisen.jpg

 

A tad overrisen before they went into the oven.  The flavor's good, but they're best sliced lengthwise lest the slices be mistaken for biscotti.  Too bad I don't have the fixings handy to make muffaletta sandwiches.

  • Like 10

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And kneading isnt that hard and good exercise or you can use a machine to do it.

 

I don't think no-knead bread is about laziness or an unwillingness to knead bread. It's another technique for people to learn about and use as it may suit them. Many committed and skilled bakers have tried the NY Times No-Knead Bread and liked it. I encourage beginners like KofB to try it to learn about what's possible. I don't know why your results went awry, but it doesn't sound like what the bread is supposed to be like. It's supposed to be like a French-style boule.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed djyee100-  I have baked yeast breads since I was a teen and do enjoy the kneading process. I enjoy the flavor of my  no-knead loaves especially after a few days of aging. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think no-knead bread is about laziness or an unwillingness to knead bread. It's another technique for people to learn about and use as it may suit them. Many committed and skilled bakers have tried the NY Times No-Knead Bread and liked it. I encourage beginners like KofB to try it to learn about what's possible. I don't know why your results went awry, but it doesn't sound like what the bread is supposed to be like. It's supposed to be like a French-style boule.

I find making no-knead bread a revelation every time. You can almost see those gluten strands growing and strengthening as you give it its folds which are not without a certain amount of technique. To suggest that those who make no knead bread are simply lazy demonstrates a complete lack of knowledge of the process and its intended result.

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CatPoet, I must have that lovely corn loaf recipe a few posts  up on this thread -- I've seen a couple of your photos now, and it looks irresistible! Do you form it in a fabric, or basket? The shape is so attractive, and I'd love to play around more with cornmeal, if that's what's in it. Do share!

Lizz

---

"you miss 100% of the shots you don't take"

-Wayne Gretzky

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use the no knead technique for almost all of my wheat breads. It's so much more flavorful to let the yeast build gluten for you than to beat it out of the loaf with a stand mixer.

The technique is particularly effective with very slack doughs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sad, I've come to realize that besides my little "secret recipe" I know nothing about bread making. Right down to the basics, if someone asks me how much flour, yeast, salt and water I need to make 2 baguettes, 4 baguettes, 6 baguettes or any other type of bread.... The answer is, I don't know.

However I'm flabbergasted to have learned in reading one of the books forwarded to me, that after world war 2, saw dust was used to compensate the lack of flour... I guess it's nothing I should do today [emoji38]

Edited by KingofBaguette (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sawdust??  Well, that would qualify as gluten-free and high fiber.   :wink:

 

As for the other: think of it as realizing just what a wide world is out there, ready to explore!  With luck, the learning goes for a lifetime.  Is there a baker alive who thinks s/he knows it all?  That person is probably insufferable.  The masters move on to teach the rest of us, but I'll bet they keep stretching to see what's just over the horizon.

  • Like 1

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah sawdust, inner bark, hay, bull rush roots and dried peas has been used instead of flour through the ages. 

 

Pea bread is still made in some parts of Sweden.

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had poor results with the NY Times bread also.  Though one try was enough for me.

 

I have to agree with Jonorvellewalker and CatPoet.   I tried the NY Times No Knead a couple of times and found it lacking.  

I actually enjoy the whole process of bread baking so I missed the joy and satisfaction I get from baking bread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to agree with Jonorvellewalker and CatPoet.   I tried the NY Times No Knead a couple of times and found it lacking.  

I actually enjoy the whole process of bread baking so I missed the joy and satisfaction I get from baking bread.

Don't believe I tried that version or if I did I didn't stick with it. You make beautiful bread but I think you might still enjoy a Forkish loaf made with a preferment and long, slow fermentation. Still, if my bread was as good as yours.....

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anna, even prior to last year, when I found the stretch and fold method, I often made bread with a preferment, with or without sourdough starter.   Even now, probably half the loaves I make are given a day or two cold fermentation.   The longer fermentation also makes for the best pizza crust. 

 

~Ann

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anna, even prior to last year, when I found the stretch and fold method, I often made bread with a preferment, with or without sourdough starter.   Even now, probably half the loaves I make are given a day or two cold fermentation.   The longer fermentation also makes for the best pizza crust. 

 

~Ann

I guess the point I was trying to make was not that pre-ferments and long, slow retards were new but that there is much more to no -knead bread than its initial introduction in the New York Times. That I believe was an attempt to make bakers out of non-bakers and probably succeeded. Being able to bake any bread was better than not being able to bake bread at all. Those of us who have been baking for years know the value of a long, slow ferment and the various preferments.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

image.jpg

Look at those "ears"!

  • Like 7

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ann_T,

Thanks! Just love your "baby" breads.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...