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Shelby

The Bread Topic (2014 –2015)

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First attempt at Hot Cross Buns on Good Friday. Meh. Better when they were fresh than later.

 

hot cross buns.JPG

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Will try to post pictures a little later. We recently renovated our kitchen (mostly done - the cabinets and granite are in) so I had not baked in quite a while. Yesterday, I made a big batch of pão de quejo (Brazilian manioc cheese rolls - gluten free, for those that care) and some chewy lye bagels (plenty of high gluten flour, so obviously I don't care). The bagels stuck to the pan they proofed on, so they deflated a bit and looked a little ugly, but they taste wonderful.

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I made grissini and the skinny grissini torinesi

image.jpg

Edit: I have some sandwich wrap from webstaurant store, I sealed the sides with the food saver and packaged the grissini. I'll see if it helps keeping them longer. I already tried with madeleines and after 5 days they were still decent.

image.jpg


Edited by Franci (log)
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20150403_141306_zpszhsdvk9s.jpg

 

These are my hotcross buns, taste great looked horrible because my soon 3 year old  "helped".

 

Normally this recipe is our favourite one, easy to make and looks pretty.


Edited by CatPoet (log)
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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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They are all gone, but they  didnt look as good as they can.  The recipe I use is from a English cook book from 1939.

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Hot cross buns.

1.3lb strong white flour, plus extra for dusting
1 tsp salt
2 tsp ground mixed spice
1.5 oz unsalted butter, cut into cubes, plus extra for greasing
3oz sugar
1 lemon, zest only
1½ tsp fast-action yeast
1 free-range egg
10fl oz tepid milk
4oz mixed dried fruit  ( currents and mixed peels recomended, but dried apple and raisin will do)
Decoration:
flour and water enough for a paste
Golden syrup.
For the buns, sieve the flour, salt and ground mixed spice into a large mixing bowl, then rub in the butter using your fingertips. Make a well in the centre of the mixture, then add the sugar and lemon zest and yeast.  Beat the egg and add to the flour with the tepid milk. Mix together to a form a soft, pliable dough. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Carefully work the mixed dried fruit into the dough until well combined. Knead lightly  until smooth and elastic.  Shape into a ball and leave under  damp cloth to rise to doubble. Knock back and  knead  until all big bubbles are removed.  Shape into 12 smooth balls  and leave on a greased baking tray.  Let the dough rise under a damp cloth for 40 minutes or double in size.  Slash a cross on the top ( you can skip this) and then  fill in with the flour paste.   Bake in the  preheated   oven  240C/475F/Gas 8 for  8-12 min. Brush directly with  hot golden syrup and leave  to cool on a rack.
 
 
The big difference I do is that I only  use  half the flour to start with and then start kneading in more until the dough  feels right. Sometimes I need less and sometimes I need more flour.
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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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I might be the only Confessed  Bread Machine Baker  ( the machine bakes   not me )

 

I make Home Made ( Machine ) Bread that is fantastic for toast  ( in the CSB ...  please,  i do have a few standards ..)

 

and Sandwiches.  it takes me < 3 min to weigh out all the stuff, and push "Start'

 

I have a plain vanilla Sunbeam BrMachine.  55 at amazon a long time ago.  Now  65 +

 

cheaper from Sunbeam.

 

here is my tip :  

 

 

andiesenji

 

pointed this out a long time ago

 

the container is cheap, easily scratched.  if this happens, the bread will not come out.

 

the paddle is also easily scratched, or just wears out.

 

so, note the time and take  out the Paddle after the last 'punch down' by dumping the dough on a lightly floured 

 

surface, then replace the dough in the container

 

and you might be good to go.

 

but the dough sticks to the rotator shaft.  .....

 

all you need to do is invert the container, with Oven Mitts, its very hot

 

and rotate the gizmo on the bottom

 

and the loaf slides out  .

 

it took me two baking sessions to see this

 

and I have a new baking pan and paddle on the way

 

32 or so Bucks it is

 

that's a lot of M.R. !


Edited by rotuts (log)
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Hot cross buns.

1.3lb strong white flour, plus extra for dusting
1 tsp salt
2 tsp ground mixed spice
1.5 oz unsalted butter, cut into cubes, plus extra for greasing
3oz sugar
1 lemon, zest only
1½ tsp fast-action yeast
1 free-range egg
10fl oz tepid milk
4oz mixed dried fruit  ( currents and mixed peels recomended, but dried apple and raisin will do)
Decoration:
flour and water enough for a paste
Golden syrup.
For the buns, sieve the flour, salt and ground mixed spice into a large mixing bowl, then rub in the butter using your fingertips. Make a well in the centre of the mixture, then add the sugar and lemon zest and yeast.  Beat the egg and add to the flour with the tepid milk. Mix together to a form a soft, pliable dough. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Carefully work the mixed dried fruit into the dough until well combined. Knead lightly  until smooth and elastic.  Shape into a ball and leave under  damp cloth to rise to doubble. Knock back and  knead  until all big bubbles are removed.  Shape into 12 smooth balls  and leave on a greased baking tray.  Let the dough rise under a damp cloth for 40 minutes or double in size.  Slash a cross on the top ( you can skip this) and then  fill in with the flour paste.   Bake in the  preheated   oven  240C/475F/Gas 8 for  8-12 min. Brush directly with  hot golden syrup and leave  to cool on a rack.
 
 
The big difference I do is that I only  use  half the flour to start with and then start kneading in more until the dough  feels right. Sometimes I need less and sometimes I need more flour.

 

Thanks for the recipe CatPoet I must make these.

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20150411_105331_zpsq1blfud6.jpg

 

Round bread is  Knäckebröd ( crispbread), it is a type call quick knäckebröd with  seeds, rye/ wheat and black cumin.

The bread behind is a purple carrot and hazelnut loaf. Yes it has purple spots.

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Lätt Knäckebröd

 

600 ml coarse rye flour  or  40% wheat 60% fine rye  or 50% wheat and 50% barely or oatmeal

1 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoon sugar or honey

100 gram butter, margerine or lard

1 teaspoon baking powder or ½ teaspoon baking soda

100 ml   seeds + spices.

100- 200 ml cold water + ½ tablespoon of vingear if using baking soda.

 

 

Mix flour, salt, baking powder or baking soda, seeds spices in a bowl, stir in sugar or honey and then  add the fat and work in the butter until sandy texture. Add water until you have a firm dough, and it should be really firm.   Roll out to a thin sheet, stabb with a fork all over or use a  "kruskavel" a knobbly , textured rolling pin. Cut out  to what every shape you want.  Bake for 5-8 min at 250 C.

 

This recipe is old,  modern flour absorbs more water then they did in the past so the water is bit hard to know. Seeds, you kan have  sesamy seeds, poppyseeds, sunflower, flax.  Bigger seeds or nuts needs to be chopped.  I use black cumin in this but you can use caraway , dill or what every you fancy.

 

It even says for  Nubbe afton  ( Booze night but posher), you can make this with  flat beer and no need for vinegar and  left over  broth can also be used. 
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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Saves me asking the question - the Knäckebröd looks so attractive. I have to make flat and crisp breads for a friend's wedding reception. The groom is wheat intollerent but can do rye so I shall try out the rye version with beer I think - I have a feeling that would go down well with the groom! Thanks CatPoet.

 

I was going to say the same for the focaccine you posted a few weeks back, Franci. Some breads just make you want to get stuck in.

 

Mick


Mick Hartley

The PArtisan Baker

bethesdabakers

"I can give you more pep than that store bought yeast" - Evolution Mama (don't you make a monkey out of me)

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Thanks CatPoet!!! They go on my immediate list of to try stuff. Love to have crispbread around

 

Mick, I have one more suggestion for you. These crackers also have no gluten, if you use certified no gluten oats.  I love them. I tried them with seaweeds, aniseed and dates, rosemary an raisins, plain.

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I just like the recipe because it more general idea then a true recipe.  I got 18  round small cakes.  You  could try to make them  with oatmeal only with lard, I do have that in another recipe.

 

I also have sweet rye cookie recipe , somewhere near, they are one of my favourites.

 

I will give you a  knäckebröd recipe that is more like Leksands bread.   Oh if you have IKEA near by, they carry  knäckebröd and sometimes pure  rye (råg) knäckebröd.


Edited by CatPoet (log)

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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For dinner I made some focaccine using some potato flakes in the dough. Drizzled with extra virgin olive oil and cold water, coarse salt and herbs de Provence on some

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Would you be wiling to share your recipe for these?

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I just like the recipe because it more general idea then a true recipe.  I got 18  round small cakes.  You  could try to make them  with oatmeal only with lard, I do have that in another recipe.

 

I also have sweet rye cookie recipe , somewhere near, they are one of my favourites.

 

I will give you a  knäckebröd recipe that is more like Leksands bread.   Oh if you have IKEA near by, they carry  knäckebröd and sometimes pure  rye (råg) knäckebröd.

 

Thanks!

 

Would you be wiling to share your recipe for these?

 

For about 10 focaccine you'll need

 

500 g flour

70 g of potato flakes (I used Bob red mill)

about 450 g of water

1 1/2 teaspoons of salt (more kosher or fleur de sel to spinkle on top if you like)

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

2 teaspoon instant yeast

1 teaspoon sugar

 

I knead everything in the mixer for about 10 minutes. Let double in bulk and divide in 10 pieces. Let proof again for about 15-20 minutes on the bench sprinkled with flour, Flatten with your hands and make small indentations with the tip of your fingers and wet the top with a mix of extra virgin olive oil and little water, sprinkle with coarse salt and herbs if using. They go in a preheated oven at 425 F for about 15-20 minutes.

 

Here some picture of how the dough looks like.

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Hey CatPoet,how about this:

dragon 001 small.jpg

The dragon is one of the national emblems of Wales as I'm sure you all know, so a few would be great for the reception (not too many - that dough cutter is a little fiddly!)

knackebrod 003 small.jpg

I think these are smaller than tradition but they look and taste great. Just 100% wholemeal rye, sesame seed and water for a first try. Thanks - you posted this just at the right time for me.

 

Franci - thanks for the link but I'm just a common-or-garden bread baker. Anyone calling something "The Bread that Changed my Life" needs to get one (a life that is). Anyone who has coeliac disease has my total sympathy but there are so few of them around and so many eating crap bread and blaming gluten, wheat, carbs. Bring on the focaccine! (but convert them to sourdough first).

 

Best wishes

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Mick Hartley

The PArtisan Baker

bethesdabakers

"I can give you more pep than that store bought yeast" - Evolution Mama (don't you make a monkey out of me)

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Franci - thanks for the link but I'm just a common-or-garden bread baker. Anyone calling something "The Bread that Changed my Life" needs to get one (a life that is). Anyone who has coeliac disease has my total sympathy but there are so few of them around and so many eating crap bread and blaming gluten, wheat, carbs. Bring on the focaccine! (but convert them to sourdough first).

 

Best wishes

 

Thanks Mick, I'm with you. I tried on that blog her life changing bread and for my own taste I thought it was awful...These crackers are instead very good, everybody who tried them (nobody eating a gluten free diet) found them very good. The focacce converted with sourdough and longer rising can be only better. I'll go back to wild yeast soon or later...I miss that.

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Hey CatPoet,how about this:

attachicon.gifdragon 001 small.jpg

The dragon is one of the national emblems of Wales as I'm sure you all know, so a few would be great for the reception (not too many - that dough cutter is a little fiddly!)

attachicon.gifknackebrod 003 small.jpg

I think these are smaller than tradition but they look and taste great. Just 100% wholemeal rye, sesame seed and water for a first try. Thanks - you posted this just at the right time for me.

 

Franci - thanks for the link but I'm just a common-or-garden bread baker. Anyone calling something "The Bread that Changed my Life" needs to get one (a life that is). Anyone who has coeliac disease has my total sympathy but there are so few of them around and so many eating crap bread and blaming gluten, wheat, carbs. Bring on the focaccine! (but convert them to sourdough first).

 

Best wishes

 

Nice!  Did you taste them?

Looks a bit  thicker  then we make them,  but the size is    the size I make them since I cant store pizza plate  size breads and also  that looks nicer for a party.  Nice dragon, my dragon cutter always loses it tail, not fun.  I have made robot out of this ones. Mine are thin, because I love them really crispy.

 

I do have a recipe on  Rye sour dough bread.  It has zero wheat in it and you can add seeds and nuts too it, if you want too, but it takes 5 days to make all in all and that includes the 2 days to mature after baking.


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Hi CatPoet

 

I certainly did taste them. I had some with cheese last night (you know that dangerous dairy product that contains fats and salt). They were really good - consistency of oat cakes. I thought maybe they were thicker than intended but you have to try things out. My water was up to 215g - and I added more after it had been sitting for half an hour - that's wholemeal rye and unhulled sesame for you, soaks it up. Next time I'm going wetter from the start - and it's going to be beer.

 

I have plenty of serious sourdough rye recipes thank you. But if you want to start a rye thread I'm with you.

 

Best wishes

 

Mick


Mick Hartley

The PArtisan Baker

bethesdabakers

"I can give you more pep than that store bought yeast" - Evolution Mama (don't you make a monkey out of me)

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It should be a firm dough, think pasta dough and  as thin as setting  4 of 6 setting when rolled out, if that helps.  Mine breads where 2 mm thick, otherwise it becomes   like oatcakes or as we say kex.

 

Cheese is good for you if you go by   some diets  and cheese is  good for your teeth.  I do enjoy cheese.  

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Here is the other recipe I promised.   It is a bit big and  I just translated it as it is written, it is from a baking group  I know and I have baked with them once.

 

Knäckebröd

cirka 90 kakor
 
2 kg wheat flour ( plain flour)
 
2½ kg of  rye, barely or oat flour fine or a mixture of coarse and fine.
 
500 gram  fresh yeast
 
1 kg of margarine or butter or lard
 
40 gram of  fennel and aniseed or  cumin and dill seeds or a what ever you like
100  ml  sugar
 
50 ml of salt
 
About 4 litre of water or beer or apple juice or milk
 
2 kg of wheat flour ( plain flour)
 
Melt   the fat and add  2 litre of water and heat to finger warmth,  heat the rest of the water to the same heat. Add the yeast to the  butter/water and stir until dissolved. 
 
In a large kneading trough  add   the dry ingredients, knead in the water/fat/ yeast  first and then add  the rest of the water so you have a firm dough. Rise for 20- 30 min in a warm place .  Then knead in  more flour until you have a  dough that can be easily rolled with a  rolling pin, holds it shape and can be lifted. Divided the dough into 90 balls, roll out every one to about  tablecloth thickness then roll with a textured rolling pin or stab with a fork. Remove a hole in the middle of hanging. Rise for  10 minutes some where warm and bake  at 250 C in a old fashion stone oven or  in a normal oven for 5 min. Leave to  cool on a rack.   
You need at least  4 people  to do this.
 
According to one person this can be made with just rye or barely but I never done it.

Edited by CatPoet (log)
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Thanks!

For about 10 focaccine you'll need

500 g flour

70 g of potato flakes (I used Bob red mill)

about 450 g of water

1 1/2 teaspoons of salt (more kosher or fleur de sel to spinkle on top if you like)

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

2 teaspoon instant yeast

1 teaspoon sugar

I knead everything in the mixer for about 10 minutes. Let double in bulk and divide in 10 pieces. Let proof again for about 15-20 minutes on the bench sprinkled with flour, Flatten with your hands and make small indentations with the tip of your fingers and wet the top with a mix of extra virgin olive oil and little water, sprinkle with coarse salt and herbs if using. They go in a preheated oven at 425 F for about 15-20 minutes.

Here some picture of how the dough looks like.

Once you have flattened and shaped the bread, does it go straight into the oven or does it rest on the baking sheets for a bit?
Edited by ElsieD (log)

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