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The Bread Topic (2014 –2015)


Shelby
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Host's note: this topic is continued from The Bread Topic (2009 - 2014)

 

 

I made white bread from from The Bread Baker's Apprentice by Peter Reinhart.  I used variation #1.  Best white bread I've ever made.

 

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Edited by Smithy (log)
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Hoping this signifies the return of my bread mojo! This is Dan Lepard's Sour Cream Sandwich Loaf adapted (not by me) for the TMX.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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I dont have any fancy bakers to call upon, this just two   barley loafs  from a recipe I know  from my childhood.  Barley is such a forgotten grain when it comes to the flour, not grits, pearls or sprouts those people know.  I think most people dont grab  a bag of fine milled barley for making white bread, but if they did they would find  something truly yummy.

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Hoping this signifies the return of my bread mojo! This is Dan Lepard's Sour Cream Sandwich Loaf adapted (not by me) for the TMX.

That looks more like an Anna loaf!  Glad you got your mojo back.

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Would love to have the recipes for both the above breads. Any possibility?

Here you go:

http://www.forumthermomix.com/index.php?topic=9106.0

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I dont have any fancy bakers to call upon, this just two   barley loafs  from a recipe I know  from my childhood.  Barley is such a forgotten grain when it comes to the flour, not grits, pearls or sprouts those people know.  I think most people dont grab  a bag of fine milled barley for making white bread, but if they did they would find  something truly yummy.

20140814_185110_zpsaaf9da02.jpg

 

 

20140814_185010_zps993483fa.jpg

CatPoet, those look lovely also. Is that recipe from childhood something you care to share? I've only used coarse barley flour, in flatbreads, but I like the flavor. I'd like to try something like your bread.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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It is volume not wiegth and used to be made by measuring with a certain  coffee cup, but since I was clever as young I measured  up how much  this cup took and wrote  down the  measurement in  decilitres which is the common modern way of measuring stuff in Sweden.  Served me well when the cup at last broke.

 

Kornlimpa.

500 ml fine barley flour

500 ml   boiling water

500 ml cold water

50 gram of  fresh yeast or 2 tablespoon of dry active yeast

1 tablespoon salt

½ tablespoon of dark treacle

1½ tablespoon of golden syrup

 plain flour  ( in Sweden we say Wheat  flour or bread flour)

 

In a bowl that can take heat  add the barley and salt . Start stirring with a wooden spoon to break any clumps, and pour in the boiling water.  Stir and stir, it  will be hard work  but worth it.  Leave to mature, 2 hours minimum and  12 hours maximum ( dont know why 12 is max, never tried longer and I trust  Granny) .  In another bowl add the cold water and  treacle/ syrup and  stir in the fresh yeast.  If you using dry yeast  add a bit of plain flour with the  dry yeast, it  works better that way. Now add the barley and  knead in as much flour as you need to get a non sticky, soft and  pliable dough.  I start in  the bowl and when it is  tacky, I pour it on my  work top with bit of flour and knead until  done, adding flour when I need.  Leave it to rise  1- 1½ hour under a towel .  Then just dived the dough into 2 loafs, you dont need to knead  that much just a little to break any big bubbles. Lay the bread on a floured  baking tray ( mine can take 2 loafs).  Leave to rise for  40 min.  Score from nose to bottom and if you want to you can brush the bread with a mixture of  1 teaspoon milk and 2 tablespoon of water  or  2 tablespoon of water + 1 teaspoon treacle.   Bake at 250 C for 10 minutes and then lower to 200 C and bake for 30 min. 

 

I hope you can understand this recipe because I am trying to translate while my daughter is  screaming at her toys.

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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It is volume not wiegth and used to be made by measuring with a certain  coffee cup, but since I was clever as young I measured  up how much  this cup took and wrote  down the  measurement in  decilitres which is the common modern way of measuring stuff in Sweden.  Served me well when the cup at last broke.

 

Kornlimpa.

500 ml fine barley flour

500 ml   boiling water

500 ml cold water

50 gram of  fresh yeast or 2 tablespoon of dry active yeast

1 tablespoon salt

½ tablespoon of dark treacle

1½ tablespoon of golden syrup

 plain flour  ( in Sweden we say Wheat  flour or bread flour)

 <instructions snipped>

 

I hope you can understand this recipe because I am trying to translate while my daughter is  screaming at her toys.

I can handle deciliters fine, thanks, and the instructions are clear. I do have a couple of questions:

Is 'golden syrup' what we would call light corn syrup, or light (sugar) molasses, or something else?

By 'cold water' do you mean 'tap water cold' or 'ice cold' or somewhere between? I'm used to using lukewarm water - around 40C - with dried yeast to get it going.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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The problem is the recipe calls for  dark syrup, which is  Sweden is  in between the British golden  syrup and dark treacle. It is made with sugar and not high fructose.. I guess you could use 2 tablespoon of dark  corn syrup, it has the same colour but not sure about the flavour.   Maybe light corn syrup and bit of molasses or barley malt syrup would be closer in flavour..  

 

Or just change it to honey.

 

Tap cold water.  It seams  to work with dried yeast too.  Just wait until the dough has doubled in size when it rises the first time. I normally use luke warm water but I never have for this recipe. But we do have different types of yeast and  the one I use dont need  to be activated. You could   take half the  cold water make it luke warm and add the yeast to get it going. 

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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I'm not big on baking, but my sister challenged me to a bread bake-off. My first ever go at no knead bread:

 

c8q7LhS.jpg

 

I unfortunately overproofed the dough, but the crust developed quite well. Haven't cut it open yet...

Congratulations. Bet it tastes great.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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The recipe I used:

 

600 g AP flour (100%)
475 g water (79%)
10 g salt (1,6%)
2 g dry yeast (0,3%)

Polenta grains for outside crust

 

The method is identical to the Jim Lahey no knead bread.

 

I didn't really know what to expect, except that I knew the dough was gonna be wet. And it was. I notice that Jim Lahey's recipe uses 75% water, which I might try next time as I found this dough very hard to shape, which resulted in me having to shape it twice resulting in polenta grains being folded inside the bread. The crumb tasted quite nice, although a yeasty note was quite apparent (must be noted that I was the only in the family who picked up on this) which I am pretty sure was due to the over proofing. I really liked the elastic texture of the crumb, something I have never managed to do at home before, but always wanted to make after eating it in restaurants. The crust was crispy but at the same time a bit chewy.

 

For a first attempt I am somewhat satisfied. It was a good starting point. :) Next time I will proof it for a shorter time and figure out a better method of lifting the dough into the cast iron pot to get a nicer shape.

 

WWzFJDe.jpg

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ahpadt,

You might want to try proofing it in a bowl lined with parchment paper. Then when it's time to bake you just need to lift it using the parchment paper as a sling and drop it into the heated pot.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I thought it look like a cute  chubby manatee....

 

So I need to bake again in 2 days time, should I make a sour dough with barley or   barley  cakes ? 

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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ahpadt:  Kneading bread isnt as hard as people think.  I suck on no knead bread, always have but I can make ace  rolls with very little work.

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Three small loaves of ciabatta done in the Thermomix.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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What parts of the breadmaking process does the Thermomix cover, Anna?  It doesn't do the baking, does it?  I know nothing about those things.

It takes care of the mixing and kneading. For many breads the initial ferment can also take place in the Thermomix "bowl" reducing dishwashing. For this very wet ciabatta dough it does all of the mixing chores. This can be a great help for those with limited use of their hands, those who can't stand for long periods of time to knead and other impediments that might put bread making out of reach. Of course it is also very, very convenient since it has built-in scales and can also heat the liquid if needed.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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