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Shelby

The Bread Topic (2014 –2015)

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A simple white sandwich bread also made in the Thermomix.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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the TMX does the mixing, kneading , proofing ?

 

you then add to a loaf pan  and then get a last rise then bake ?

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the TMX does the mixing, kneading , proofing ?

 

you then add to a loaf pan  and then get a last rise then bake ?

The two loaves I made today behave exactly that way. It even has a built in scale!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Another eG member was kind enough to send me some Thermomix bread recipes by email. A couple of them were familiar but this one which was adapted from a Dan Lepard recipe was new to me. It is called a Sour Cream Sandwich Bread. As you can see it has beautiful loft and a fluffy crumb but I found it to be squidgy. That is a precise scientific term meaning bread that has a tendency to compact in the mouth. I know there are those who love this kind of squishy white bread. But I am not at all ungrateful. I love trying new bread recipes and in the Thermomix they barely take five minutes out of your life to make. So thank you.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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"Squidgy". That's my kind of scientific terminology.

 

Edited to add: I learn the best words from this site!


Edited by ElainaA (log)
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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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DSC00230.jpg

 

Rosemary focaccia with olives and red onions. I don't bake much in the summer but today it is cooler. 

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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The same member who sent me the recipe for the sour cream sandwich loaf also sent along a recipe for Ciabatta done in the Thermomix. Already had the recipe or at least one very similar but I've forgotten about it and haven't made it in many months. It is an amazing recipe. I will try to add a link shortly.

Edited to add

link


Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Anna that is just gorgeous!


If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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Anna, I can see a good slather of beef drippings on that slice! Or, mashed sardines in tomato sauce with a couple of good grinding of black pepper and a dash of Tabasco. Yum.

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Anna, I can see a good slather of beef drippings on that slice! Or, mashed sardines in tomato sauce with a couple of good grinding of black pepper and a dash of Tabasco. Yum.

Oh please! I was Skyping with my sister who is in England couple of days ago and we couldn't stop talking about dripping. Both of us were brought up on pork and beef dripping on bread or toast. And at one time you could actually buy it in the shops. Occasionally Kerry Beal will bring me some beef dripping and I am in heaven. But I rarely cook roasts these days so dripping is a very rare treat. Note the singular; it is not a mistake. At least if you hail from Derbyshire.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Anna that is just gorgeous!

Thank you. It is so easy it makes one feel guilty. But you're working with a dough that is about as slack as it can possibly be!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Haven't had dripping in ages because, like you we don't have the roasts like my family did every Sunday...so much so I had forgotten it is singular.

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Nope, no prohibitions, but I may not bother with the initial flops. ;-)

 

Yesterday was putter-in-the-kitchen day, and I finally made marble rye.  I decided it would be unsportsmanlike not to share the flops, and was resigned to posting a bunch of comical pictures.  As it turns out, I have only one half-alien:

 

Marble rye loaf bulge.jpg

 

When I cut into said loaf, the bulge at the left was due to a delamination between the outer layer of dough and the interior.  It didn't burn, though; just made a giant air bubble in the slice.  No picture of that section, but here's the interior:

 

Marble rye loaf cut.jpg

 

Making dinner rolls with marble rye was especially fun; I loved the variety of patterns I could get depending on how I mixed the doughs and then how I wove them.

 

Proofed rolls:

Marble rye dinner rolls proofed.jpg

 

Out of the oven: 

Marble rye dinner rolls in pan.jpg

 

Out of the pan:

Marble rye dinner rolls out of pan.jpg

 

There were no complaints at the dinner table.

  • Like 11

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Help! 

 

I may have just screwed up beyond repair, but I wanted to ask. I'm making my maiden voyage on bagels, following this recipe. Immediately upon putting that dough in to rise, I'm making the dough for the Overnight English Muffins. I had both recipes pulled up on my laptop in separate tabs, and inadvertently put the two tbsp of melted butter in the bagel dough. Will this completely eff up my bagels?

 

Also made a nice loaf of sandwich bread today, possibly the best loaf yet I've done by the Cook's Illustrated New Best Recipes recipe. I may have put a little less flour, as the dough was softer, and the finished product is nice and soft, as well. It's carb overload day, as the grandchild is coming to visit and I figure she'll want lots of sandwiches and such.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Update: Well, rather than chunk a batch of dough, I went ahead and made them. I can't tell that there are any adverse impacts. They're a bit soft, but that could also be due to the kind of flour I used -- I noticed the same in my sandwich bread, and it's a different brand (Pillsbury Gold Medal, vs. the generic Kroger all/purpose that is my usual). Anyway, bagels aren't nearly as hard as I thought they might be.

 

Boiling:

 

boiling 0915.jpg

 

Ready to bake:

 

ready to bake 0915.jpg

 

Done!

 

Done 0915.jpg

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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The bagels look wonderful, kayb! Glad you went ahead with the project, and that it worked out so well.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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The bagels look wonderful, kayb! Glad you went ahead with the project, and that it worked out so well.

 

Thanks. I was quite pleased, for a first attempt. They won't win any beauty contests, but the one I had toasted with cream cheese this morning for breakfast was pretty doggoned good.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Wanted to have bread in time for lunch. These were kneaded in the Thermomix and baked on a pizza stone. They are just a basic white bread formula but I added about 2 ounces of mixed seeds. They were spritzed twice with water in the first three minutes in the oven.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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The original recipe is on the King Arthur website, http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/beautiful-burger-buns-recipe. I have changed it slightly to incorporate some whole wheat flour and slightly decrease the amount of yeast and salt.

 

The picture I posted was a double batch. Note that the orientation of the buns in relation to the pan is different than when making a single batch in a quarter sheet pan. 

 

Hamburger/Hot Dog Buns

modified from Moomie’s buns on the KA Flour website

Makes 8 hamburger buns or 10 hot dog buns

 

1 cup boiling water

2 TB soft butter

1 egg

280g bread flour

120g whole wheat flour

48g sugar

1 tsp fine sea salt

2¼ tsp instant yeast

 

Pour boiling water over butter in metal bowl of mixer. Stir to melt butter. When cooled to a yeast-safe temperature, add all the other ingredients. Start kneading with dough hook on low speed until combined then at a slightly higher speed until a soft, somewhat tacky dough is formed.

 

Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl and let it rise until doubled, about 45 minutes.

 

For hamburger buns, transfer the dough to a lightly greased work surface, and pat/roll it into a 12" x 17" rectangle. Starting with a short (12") end, roll the dough into a log, sealing the ends and side seam. Cut the log into eight slices. Place the buns on a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Flatten the buns till they're about 3" wide.

 

For hot dog buns, divide dough into 10 (75g) portions. Shape each into a 4”x1” mini-loaf (see below) and arrange in 2 rows on a quarter sheet pan (long axis of the roll parallel to the long axis of the pan).

 

Cover the shaped buns and allow them to rise till they’re very puffy, about 1 hour. Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 375°F.

 

Uncover the buns, brush them with beaten egg white/water, and sprinkle with seeds, if desired. Bake the buns for 25 to 30 minutes, until they’re brown and feel set when you poke them. Remove them from the oven, and cool on a rack. 

 

Hot dog shaping notes: I shape the mini loaves much like the video recently posted. Cut all the portions then shape. Pat each portion into a rectangle, about 4x3 inches. Fold the top of one of the 4 inch edges down about 1/3 of the way and push down on the edge a bit to seal it. Rotate the rectangle 360 degrees and fold the new top down to meet the old top. Press to seal. Fold in half at the crease and seal the new edge tightly. Push the ends towards each other if the mini loaf is too long. Place in the pan with the seal on the bottom. The biggest problem I have is getting them evenly spaced on the pan. I should probably draw lines on the underside of the parchment. 

Cyalexa,

 

I finally made these yesterday.  OMG these are the best buns I've ever made.  Mine in the past have always turned out like crusty mini loaves (which are edible, but not what I'm looking for with a hotdog or hamburger).  I didn't have any wheat flour so I used all white.  I need to practice shaping the HD buns....I re-did them twice and they still didn't look near as good as yours.  I'm definitely doubling this recipe next time and I'm going to freeze some.  

 

Thank you so much for this recipe!!!!!!  Definitely a hit.

 

PA040781.JPG

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Cyalexa,

 

I finally made these yesterday. 

 

I an glad you liked them and think they look great. You are not lazy like me and seeded the top! 

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I an glad you liked them and think they look great. You are not lazy like me and seeded the top! 

Oh I'm lazy....if I would have had to look very far in the pantry for them, they wouldn't have appeared lol.  I used Everything Bagel seasoning from KA flour.  Good stuff.

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Shelby, great looking buns.  That is a very good recipe.  I like that you were generous with the seeds.

 

October%208th%2C%202015%20%20Four%20bagu

 

Last Thursday's bread.   Two batches, both 750g at 70% hydration.  Four  baguettes from my regular high protein flour and the

 

October%208th%2C%202015%20Half%20Bread%2

 

Boule from half regular and half double 00.  

 

Focaccia%20October%208th%2C%202015-L.jpg

Made a focaccia with some of the  Double 00 batch.  

 

Focaccia%20October%208th%2C%202015%201-L

 

 

Topped with roasted little Italian tomatoes, kalamata olives and mushrooms.

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