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Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment, 2012


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I have been having a blast the past week with my new SVS. Scallops, shrimp, brisket, eggs and salmon so far. Pork loin cochinita this weekend. Shrimp has been my favorite so far. I need to play with brisket and salmon more to get a feel for time and temp. Also want to make and freeze some marinades to place in the bag. Oh I have some chicken thighs to play with this weekend as well.

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My local supermarket had a special on what they called veal cutlets on Saturday - I suspect a cancelled export order, to judge from the packaging. They consist of racks of eight tiny rib bones.

Since they're about the same size and shape of lamb racks, for which I find SV particularly good, I thought I'd try the same time/temp and see how it goes (for lamb I go with 56°C for two or three hours, followed by a sear). Any alternative suggestions?

Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
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I've got a Polyscience coming this week, hopefully. A few small questions: I know I can use up to 30 quarts, should I just go buy a big stockpot at the local restaurant supply place, or would a cooler work better?

My current shopping list is some sort of food sealer, the aforementioned vessel to cook in, and a ton of ping pong balls for insulation thanks to PedroG. I've got water tight silicone gloves to use in the hot water, and a cast iron pan for searing. Anything else I really need to get started? I want my first sous vide run to be 72 hour short ribs, which is pretty much the reason I bought the thing.

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Why not get a lexan with a lid?

Stock pots work okay, and have the added benefit of being multitaskers. It's what I normally use. But something that's shallower and wider (like a lexan or a cooler) would be more convenient, especially when putting in lots of items.

Personally, I don't get the whole pingpong balls thing. With a lexan or a cooler, just modify the lid to accommodate the circulator. If you're using a stock pot, just get a restaurant-sized roll of cling film (which is great to have around the kitchen anyway) and cover the stock pot with cling film when doing extended sous vide cooking (there is little need for any cover if you're doing fewer than 8 hours or so).

--

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Cooler.

the lid will come off, and BTW they are not insulated. You can insulate it with foam you get in those cans: just get the non-expanding kind. drill a few holes on each side and fill. wear plastic gloves.

when set, cut out an opening on one side of the lid to accommodate the PS, and your are done.

saves energy, evaporation etc.

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I haven't experimented with this as much as I would like, but there are a number of very different muscles in the shoulder that respond differently to cooking. My favorite cut of pork, the collar is great seared and I would never take it longer than 24 hours at 60C, probably closer to 6-12 hours. A small part of the jowl steak often makes it into the shoulder too, I like this at about 5 hours at 60C.

Beyond those cuts, when cooking shoulder traditionally, I rarely consider treating each muscle differently and have not had the opportunity to do so when cooking low temperature. It would be interesting to take a small portion of each muscle in the shoulder and bag them separately to see the effects of cooking time and temperature. Considering that the shoulder houses muscles with the same anatomical structure as the beef flat iron and the teres major, which I suspect would work better with shorter cook times, it might be a worth while experiment. That said, if you get a cross section of shoulder, these pieces would make up a relatively small portion of the meat cooked.

Thanks Andrew! I have also just read in MC that some muscles in the shoulder can even be considered tender cuts. For my latest tests I bought the whole pork shoulder, so I could have make the test, but I wasn't aware of the differences and it's too late now. Will think about it next time.

I can say, lately I have been experimenting with shorter cook times for most cuts and have strongly preferred the shorter cook times. For example, I find a 16hr 56C short rib far preferable in flavor and texture to the more common 72 hour short rib, but I have yet to do any real experiments with pork shoulder.

This is something I must also try. I guess the shorter times produce firmer, more solid, textures, don't they?

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Thanks Andrew! I have also just read in MC that some muscles in the shoulder can even be considered tender cuts. For my latest tests I bought the whole pork shoulder, so I could have make the test, but I wasn't aware of the differences and it's too late now. Will think about it next time.

You bought a whole shoulder? That is perfect for experimenting. Seam butcher it separating each and every muscle (I know, easier said that done, but even if you haven't done it before some careful persistence will get you close enough). Once butchered cook each muscle as a tender piece and a hard piece, then compare.

This is something I must also try. I guess the shorter times produce firmer, more solid, textures, don't they?

Yes, more firm and toothsome, but even so I have never found something tough or unpalatable. In some cases, I have also found the more intense. I've always thought a 72hour short rib loses some beefiness.

Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

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Why not get a lexan with a lid?

This is what I did. Williams-sonoma had the 1/1 lexan container as a bonus with my PS professional. I found a lid on Amazon and used a jigsaw to cut out a 3 1/2 X 4 inch opening. I then used an X-Acto knife to trim it up. Here's what it looks like with corned beef brisket.

Lexan with lid.JPG

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You bought a whole shoulder? That is perfect for experimenting. Seam butcher it separating each and every muscle (I know, easier said that done, but even if you haven't done it before some careful persistence will get you close enough). Once butchered cook each muscle as a tender piece and a hard piece, then compare.

Too late, I already used most of it! Bones and 1 kg minced meat for stock, 1.5 kg for pressure-cooked carnitas and another 1,5 kg for cochinita pibil sous-vide! And froze the remaining 1 kg...

Next time I'll try to experiment as you describe.

Enrique

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Why not get a lexan with a lid?

This is what I did. Williams-sonoma had the 1/1 lexan container as a bonus with my PS professional. I found a lid on Amazon and used a jigsaw to cut out a 3 1/2 X 4 inch opening. I then used an X-Acto knife to trim it up. Here's what it looks like with corned beef brisket.

Lexan with lid.JPG

Did basically the same thing, only my hubbie used his Dremel to do the cutting. Here's a good tip: I see from the picture your top warps a bit with the heat too; I use large binder clips in each corner to keep a tighter seal, which helps with longer cooks.

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Shrimp has been my favorite so far.

What was your time and temp with shrimp? I haven't done shellfish SV yet, just seemed like something that wouldn't benefit from it.

I did shrimp and scallops at the same time. Seasoned the shrimp like cajun bbq shrimp and added butter. Cooked at 140/60 for 30 minutes. Poached BBQ shrimp. Perfect texture.

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dear egullet members,

i am very happy to be part of this forum from now on!

i read the egullet forums every since but now that questions arise - especially on the topic of sous vide - i though it would be time to become a member!

i hope it is ok if i post a question already:

i will be preparing a sous vide dinner - a typically south german dish called "rippchen" which translates to ribs but actually is brined and precooked meat. i would love to cook the meat which already is cooked, btw. it is pork cutlet, to be prepared sous vide. anyway, i did some test at 68degrees celsius for 2 hours and the meat came out rather dry and chewy. since i will be preparing about 5kg (10pounds) of meat i would love to know your suggestion since i have never handled the already cooked meat to make it even tender.

thank you very much in advance!

phil

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Where does the pork cutlet come from? Is it the loin? If it's the loin,then I think your temp is too hot for too much time. I usually do pork loin at roughly 57C for as much time as it takes to pasteurize, depending on thickness. If it's everythin,it won't be that long - maybe a half hour? Best to either check the tables from the first SV thread (there's an index to it) or download the awesome Sous Vide Dash app if you have an iPhone or iPad.

ETA: what is this "previously cooked" stuff? How/ why is it previously cooked?

Edited by KennethT (log)
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. . . .

i will be preparing a sous vide dinner - a typically south german dish called "rippchen" which translates to ribs but actually is brined and precooked meat. i would love to cook the meat which already is cooked, btw. it is pork cutlet, to be prepared sous vide. anyway, i did some test at 68degrees celsius for 2 hours and the meat came out rather dry and chewy. since i will be preparing about 5kg (10pounds) of meat i would love to know your suggestion since i have never handled the already cooked meat to make it even tender.

If the meat is already cooked, I'm not sure there's much to be gained by essentially reheating it sous vide; the initial cooking will have already determined the consistency to a very large extent, so if it was cooked in a way that made it dry/tough, there isn't anything to do that will reverse that, although there are things that can disguise/compensate for the texture (e.g. shredding + a sauce).

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
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mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Where does the pork cutlet come from? Is it the loin? If it's the loin,then I think your temp is too hot for too much time. I usually do pork loin at roughly 57C for as much time as it takes to pasteurize, depending on thickness. If it's everythin,it won't be that long - maybe a half hour? Best to either check the tables from the first SV thread (there's an index to it) or download the awesome Sous Vide Dash app if you have an iPhone or iPad.

ETA: what is this "previously cooked" stuff? How/ why is it previously cooked?

I think phillie means something like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankfurter_Rippchen which is cured pork loin cutlet. Personally, I would do this in the mid-50s as well.

Edited by pep. (log)
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The question might be refined by asking if a previously cooked cut of meat can be further tenderized SV?

These chops, at a 'medium' heat of say 140 for 8 hours, might be an experiment that would answer this question.

If the chops were 'dry' beforehand, they will remain dry after this. If they were 'moist' beforehand, then the result after 8 hours would be worth noting.

Love to hear the answer.

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thanks to all of you for the information! i will definitely use a lower temperature!

i know that isn't a sous vide needed cut but since we are very limited in terms if cooking material i (its an outdoor location) i thought it would be best just to bring my sous vide device.

@kennteth : its exactly the type of meat pep. showed on wikipedia, but actually there are two types of the frankfurter version, one which has no fat at all and one with a nice marbling which tastes much better in my opinion.

@rotuts: on tuesday is the marked, i will try and am very interested in the answer aswell!

@pep: yes, very very sure its cooked. there also is the regular kotlett which you have to brine yourself but frankfurter rippchen is mostly cooked and not to be mixed with kasseler rippchen ( which is cooked swell i thin )

so thanks to all of you, i will try to reheat it at a lower temperature and experiment with cooking times!

btw. sous vide cash is my favorite iPhone app! unfortunately there is no info about already cooked meat ( which is totally ok since its pretty useless to reheat cooked meat in terms of sous vide qualities )

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I tried a (conventionally) slow-cooked meal of pork cheeks in a London pub the other week, and it was great. When I found my local supermarket had them, I though I'd give them a go at home. The conventional pork cheeks were tender, though a little dry. The meat didn't seem to have much collagen in it, so I though I'd be able to get away with a low-ish temperature.

I couldn't find any recipes online, so I had to make something up. I settled on 60⁰C for 36 hours, but scheduling issues meant they had to stay in the cooker for another day, ending up with 60 hours cooking.

I put a bit of sage and ground black pepper on the meat before sealing. After cooking, I dried and shallow-fried the cheeks to brown them. I served them with a sauce made from the pork juices (plentiful), reduced slightly, with some gravy granules and red wine.

They were fantastic. Beautifully tender, but still holding together. I was afraid that the meat would have essentially dissolved given the long cooking times.

I might try them a couple of degrees lower next time as there was a slight stringyness to the meat. You wouldn't call them dry, but they weren't as smooth as some meats I've done.

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Silver tip roasts- I know I had posted about a month or so ago inquiring what would be best, so for future reference, since there are several posts on the web inquiring about it but very little advice- vacuum bagged it with a nice spice rub, flattening it to about 2.5". Cooked it at 132.5 for a little over 24 hours. Quick sear and sliced thin like roast beef. It was fabulous- soft, but with a roast beef texture and flavor. Absolutely perfect!

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Today's rack of lamb 3h/56°C was perfectly pink, fork-tender and succulent as always. And here's the trick how to dispose of the bones avoiding crows and foxes to forage in the garbage bag: vacuum-seal them in the used bag including the paper towels used to dab dry!

Leftover_bones_sealed.jpg

Edited by PedroG (log)

Peter F. Gruber aka Pedro

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