Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment, 2012


rotuts
 Share

Recommended Posts

snip.jpg

Here's a picture to go with the words. The horizontal seal is 4mm, made by the impulse sealer.

One can also seal an ordinary drinking straw into a top corner of the pouch; align the bag so that the impulse sealer just nicks the straw without closing it. This can be made to work, but it's fiddly. A snipped corner and the water displacement method is easier and does a better job of removing all air.

I don't recommend the small impulse sealer shown, which only works with 6" pouches. The nominal width should be strictly greater than the widest pouch you'll ever want to seal; the same nominal width will just miss. This purchase was a mistake, to take up less space in my wife's kitchen; my 12" impulse sealer is much more versatile.

Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"

Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any recommendations for time and water temperature to pasteurize tuna "confit" (internal temp 145F and/or 160F)?

40mm thick pieces, cooked in grapeseed oil (50% by weight of the fish).

I've had good results in 145F water for 1 hour (40mm thick pieces) but want to ensure good shelf life until I can use it all up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Three hours at 140F will pasteurize your fish (figure taken from Douglas Baldwin's practical guide for sous vide for fatty fish; non belly would be a slightly shorter cooking time). I would have thought tuna would be overcooked at 160F.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So that I have enough seasoned oil to emulsify into the tuna sauce and to cover whatever portion i have leftover without resorting to using those awful bags, which I believe are the scourge of culinary humanity. The waste generated by restaurants is shameful and while the guy who signs my paycheck insists on using this trend, i'll try to forego using another bag whenever I have the opportunity to. Whoever is able to develop a reusable vacuum bag will retire on a beach next to the folks who developed Cool-Ranch Doritos flavoring.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So that I have enough seasoned oil to emulsify into the tuna sauce and to cover whatever portion i have leftover without resorting to using those awful bags, which I believe are the scourge of culinary humanity. The waste generated by restaurants is shameful and while the guy who signs my paycheck insists on using this trend, i'll try to forego using another bag whenever I have the opportunity to. Whoever is able to develop a reusable vacuum bag will retire on a beach next to the folks who developed Cool-Ranch Doritos flavoring.

I was holding out great hope for the silicone bags I purchased - sadly they don't seal worth a shit!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sadly they don't seal

These bag clips can seal up to 8.5" in width, and work well:

http://www.sorbentsy...m/bagclips.html

The usual "hardware store" puzzle: No manufacturer has anticipated your problem, but someone has made something for a different purpose (here, protecting oxygen absorbers) that works for you.

Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"

Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had this "issue" for a while now, regarding the colour of the meat. A couple of years ago when I started with sous vide cooking, a great things was the colour of the cooked meat. Beef looked nice and red at 136F/58C, pork tenderloin was nicely pink at 140F/60C and so on, duck breast too. I used a wateroven and a clamp sealer, sometimes ziploc-bags. Looking back at pictures, the meat looks great. The meat looked a lot more "raw" when cooked sous vide, compared to regular roasting/searing, even if the temperature was the same.

Nowadays I'm using a chamber sealer and an immersion circulator. However, I think the meat looks too pale when cooked. I usually cook tender beef cuts at 128F/53C. Pork tenderloin and duck breast at 131F/56C, However, the meat often looks gray/white. It's still juicy and tender, but it looks overcooked, even if I take it out of the bag and leave it for a couple of minutes. I really thought my Christmas duck breast would look gorgeous at 131F, but they were barely pink at all.

I know the lack of air affects the colour, but shouldnt the colour return after a minute or so? Does the cooking time affect the colour too?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Made baby back ribs in the sous vide machine for the first time last night. Freaking awesome. I should have used the torch rather than the broiler at the end, but the results were spectacular. I did them at 176F for 6 hours due to time constraints. I don't know if a longer time at lower temp would be any better as these were perfect in my opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had this "issue" for a while now, regarding the colour of the meat. A couple of years ago when I started with sous vide cooking, a great things was the colour of the cooked meat. Beef looked nice and red at 136F/58C, pork tenderloin was nicely pink at 140F/60C and so on, duck breast too. I used a wateroven and a clamp sealer, sometimes ziploc-bags. Looking back at pictures, the meat looks great. The meat looked a lot more "raw" when cooked sous vide, compared to regular roasting/searing, even if the temperature was the same.

Nowadays I'm using a chamber sealer and an immersion circulator. However, I think the meat looks too pale when cooked. I usually cook tender beef cuts at 128F/53C. Pork tenderloin and duck breast at 131F/56C, However, the meat often looks gray/white. It's still juicy and tender, but it looks overcooked, even if I take it out of the bag and leave it for a couple of minutes. I really thought my Christmas duck breast would look gorgeous at 131F, but they were barely pink at all.

I know the lack of air affects the colour, but shouldnt the colour return after a minute or so? Does the cooking time affect the colour too?

I've foudn that it takes a good 20-30 minutes in open air for the red color to come back to steaks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta think SV could produce great greens, esp. collard and kale, but can't find any references to either collard or kale in this topic, the eG SV index, nor any luck with more broad searching. I'm guessing 185F as a starting point but have no idea about time, 1 hour maybe. I'm thinking of trimming/chopping/bagging them with a small amount of crumbled bacon, planning to add vinegar (type TBD), etc. ex-bag. Any suggestions or links?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta think SV could produce great greens, esp. collard and kale, but can't find any references to either collard or kale in this topic, the eG SV index

Thomas Keller is pretty definite about excluding many green vegetables from sous vide, though his concern is in part preserving color. He prefers "big pot boiling" where one cooks just to the point of tenderness in a gigantic, very salty pot of boiling water, then plunges into ice water to arrest the cooking. This was one of the better home cooking lessons from The French Laundry Cookbook, reprised in Under Pressure.

One can easily overdo the saltiness with the wrong vegetable; I ruined English peas this way once. It's fantastic for many applications. I'd try slicing greens rather thin, and seeing if I could live with the texture this way.

Of course Italian vegetables aren't done till their color resembles army clothing. Go for 185 F sous vide, you aren't serving skycraper food?

Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"

Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta think SV could produce great greens, esp. collard and kale, but can't find any references to either collard or kale in this topic, the eG SV index

Thomas Keller is pretty definite about excluding many green vegetables from sous vide, though his concern is in part preserving color. He prefers "big pot boiling" where one cooks just to the point of tenderness in a gigantic, very salty pot of boiling water, then plunges into ice water to arrest the cooking. This was one of the better home cooking lessons from The French Laundry Cookbook, reprised in Under Pressure.

One can easily overdo the saltiness with the wrong vegetable; I ruined English peas this way once. It's fantastic for many applications. I'd try slicing greens rather thin, and seeing if I could live with the texture this way.

Of course Italian vegetables aren't done till their color resembles army clothing. Go for 185 F sous vide, you aren't serving skycraper food?

In for a penny, in for a pound, I should say. Or at least I should start saying that more often, anyway. All salted solutions should be described with weight fractions - anything else is horsepoppy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All salted solutions should be described with weight fractions

I'd agree. I ordered Fuschia Dunlop's new book from the UK to avoid the risk that the US version would be dumbed down, not in grams. Paul Bertolli's Cooking by Hand very nicely teaches one to compute brines by equilibrium salinity, using a guess as to the water percentage of the meat itself.

Keller calls for a cup of kosher salt per gallon. As a practical matter one will run several vegetables in turn through his giant pot, with different cooking times by taste. So if one kept careful notes the ideal salinity would vary by vegetable, based on contact time.

Lucky for me, my wife thinks salt is the new sugar.

[Moderator's note: discussion continues in Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment, 2013]

Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"

Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...