Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Spraying Chocolate: Equipment, Materials, and Techniques


Recommended Posts

Here are the pics. First, here is the El Rey white and the hand cream ready for melting. I chopped them both a bit more. I simply heated in the microwave until most of the chunks dissolved and then babied it until completely dissolved so as to not overheat.

gallery_41282_4652_3893.jpg

Here are tools. I had a 5.2HP painter. I could have bought the cheaper ones, but my fear was that the chocolate would have been too thick to work through easily (that wasn't a problem at all). You can also see the colored buttercream - Aztez Orange from Chef Rubber.

gallery_41282_4652_17869.jpg

eG member Patrick A assisted on the project. We heard the recommendation to work on the ground, but I'm tall and my back ached at the thought, so we set up on our prep table. We draped the table with butcher paper. As I sprayed, Patrick would hold up the paper behind where I was blowing to catch overspray - worked like a charm. I did the 2:1 ratio and it was very thin, but apparently, just right. I would compare it to the viscosity of a cheap Wal-Mart paint - watery indoor latex. I checked the temp, simply by touch - waiting until slightly warm to the touch.

gallery_41282_4652_21286.jpg

This photo shows the coverage:

gallery_41282_4652_13146.jpg

Here's the final product before decoration. This was a passionfruit cheesecake.

gallery_41282_4652_3150.jpg

Unfortunately this pic is blurry, but I tempered some chocolate onto a transfer sheet with a weave design and added my signature card. The event was a fundraiser for our local women's fiber art guild. I didn't know that my colors would match theirs - see the edge of the seating card:

gallery_41282_4652_11671.jpg

Thanks again for everyone's suggestions and guidance. As always - you're super!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Was there much cleanup?

Clean up was very fast the way we did it. The sprayed area was just crumple the paper and toss. Because of how we used the paper, there was no overspray to clean off the floor. The painter was my fear knowing how stubborn chocolate can be. I just let my water get as hot as it could and filled the paint container, washed out the chocolate by hand, re-filled and sprayed it until the container was empty and the water was running clear (just like when you use paint). I then hand washed the container and did some spot check cleaning of the nozzle. I'll check today to see if there is any residue, but I didn't feel any. Less than 5 minutes of cleaning.

Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, I have to say that the pieces turned out absolutely gorgeous! Love the effect you get with the spraying.

Next, I wanted to ask more about the "hand cream." I've heard that cosmetic grade hand cream is probably ok to use EXCEPT if they put preservatives in that are "external use only..."

P.S. If you're going to do a lot of spraying, then it may be helpful to setup a spray box. Just a large box that has the side facing you cut out. Then you can fold it for easy storage and not worry at all about cleanup.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
First of all, I have to say that the pieces turned out absolutely gorgeous!  Love the effect you get with the spraying.

Next, I wanted to ask more about the "hand cream."  I've heard that cosmetic grade hand cream is probably ok to use EXCEPT if they put preservatives in that are "external use only..."

P.S.  If you're going to do a lot of spraying, then it may be helpful to setup a spray box.  Just a large box that has the side facing you cut out.  Then you can fold it for easy storage and not worry at all about cleanup.

Thanks John for the complements and tips. The hand cream seemed safe (and 2 days later no one that I know of ended up in the hospital). I read the label very carefully and it contained nothing but cocoa butter - no preservatives, no colors, no fragrances. So, my assumption is still that the "external use" was because the factory isn't food certified. Which, I acknowledge, is reason enough to not use it in a commerical setting...which I'm not.

Link to post
Share on other sites
First of all, I have to say that the pieces turned out absolutely gorgeous!  Love the effect you get with the spraying.

Next, I wanted to ask more about the "hand cream."  I've heard that cosmetic grade hand cream is probably ok to use EXCEPT if they put preservatives in that are "external use only..."

P.S.  If you're going to do a lot of spraying, then it may be helpful to setup a spray box.  Just a large box that has the side facing you cut out.  Then you can fold it for easy storage and not worry at all about cleanup.

Thanks John for the complements and tips. The hand cream seemed safe (and 2 days later no one that I know of ended up in the hospital). I read the label very carefully and it contained nothing but cocoa butter - no preservatives, no colors, no fragrances. So, my assumption is still that the "external use" was because the factory isn't food certified. Which, I acknowledge, is reason enough to not use it in a commerical setting...which I'm not.

Ok, whoa... (backing up now...) let me get a clarification here. Sorry if I'm a little dense.

Are you saying that the cocoa butter you used was marked "external use only?"

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

(Note: short, jovial response not appropriate here based on John's response)

When I realized my only option in town was the hand cream from our health food co-op, I bought the cream and called the 800 number on the package. It was a small operation so the person I spoke with had definitive knowledge of the product. I explained what I planned on doing with it. There was a clear under and overtone to the response. Basically he explained that (overtone) their plant was not certified for food product use and they did not market their product for that use. His less legalistic response (undertone) was that there was absolutely nothing in there except cocoa butter, and that nothing else is processed in their plant except cocoa butter - to which he added his "health food store" response that they don't use any additives of any kind in their products. He made it clear that it wasn't what the product was designed for, but didn't dissuade me.

In the end, you would have had to have heard the conversation to appreciate it (I think we've all had similar ones however). When I hung up the phone I had no concerns about using the hand cream.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I spotted a picture of someone using a small dual action airbrush for chocolate and this got me to wondering.

I was under the impression that one had to go to the huge paint sprayers for this work, but now I'm wondering if I could get away with my cheap Badger airbrush for small cakes.

Does anyone have direct experience with a small airbrush and thined chocolate?

Edited by David J. (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

david, you probably can get away with it. i don't know about even coverage though.

to add an addendum to gfron1's experience with the cocoa butter:

i asked my colleague what he thought about using vegetable oil in a pinch (if you don't have cocoa butter)...he said it is fine, but you might not end up with the nice velvety effect that you do with cocoa butter. the cocoa butter is there not only for thinning the chocolate but also so that it sets up quickly on the frozen sprayed item. vegetable oil doesn't "set up" the same way as it doesn't contain the same crystal structure that cocoa butter does.

so, i'll give it a try one day, and post results...just because i'm curious what the visual results will be. the chocolate might have enough cocoa butter included to give you the velvety look...who knows. i guess i'd rather use vegetable oil instead of something i might question as to being food-safe.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a cheap Badger for the smaller colored cocoa butter jobs.

What model badger airbrush do you have?

I have model 250-4 with the 4 oz jar, but I'd recommend the 250-1 mini with the 3/4 oz jars. I think that's a better size for colored cocoa butter work. You can see the mini in Chef Norman Love's hands in my recent trip report of his guest chef class at the French Pastry School.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...

Hi Everyone,

I'm wondering what you all think of the Cocoa Butter Sprays that you can purchase from Chef Rubber etc?

Are they any good? I'm thinking of using them in place of an airbrush to colour my Chocolate Moulds. Would you get a similar effect? Does anyone have any photos of chocolates made using this product?

I'm new to chocolate making, and am in the process of collecting supplies, to start making them. (Not quite a chocolate virgin as I took a basic class LOL)

Thanks so much for any advice and opinions,

Danni

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Everyone,

I'm wondering what you all think of the Cocoa Butter Sprays that you can purchase from Chef Rubber etc?

Are they any good?  I'm thinking of using them in place of an airbrush to colour my Chocolate Moulds.  Would you get a similar effect?  Does anyone have any photos of chocolates made using this product?

I'm new to chocolate making, and am in the process of collecting supplies, to start making them. (Not quite a chocolate virgin as I took a basic class LOL)

Thanks so much for any advice and opinions,

Danni

They are very good. I use the jewel line with an airbrush or finger or q-tip.

Jeffrey Stern

www.jeffreygstern.com

http://bit.ly/cKwUL4

http://destination-ecuador.net

cocoapodman at gmail dot com

Link to post
Share on other sites
The colored cocoa butters from Chef Rubber are very good. But it sounds like you're referring to something else? Can you link to the actual product you're interested in?

Yes, I am referring to the cocoa butter sprays. My chocolatier friend mentioned the Cocoa butter Sprays, and said he uses them instead of using an air brush. So, I just wondered what everyone thinks of his product and how it compares to actually air brushing the normal cocoa butters.

https://www.shopchefrubber.com/home.php?cat=1151

Thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've not used them, so I can't comment on the usability. But they're definitely not very cost effective relative to the cocoa butters - $22 for 100 ml vs $19.50 for 200 ml. And I wonder what they're using for propellant and how food safe it is?

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

Link to post
Share on other sites

I played with one can of spray gold cocoa butter over at a shop I was teaching in. It was impossible to control the amount of spray - I ended up with a lot more spray in the mold that I would have liked.

It may have been more useful when spraying on finished product than into a mold however.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've not used them, so I can't comment on the usability. But they're definitely not very cost effective relative to the cocoa butters - $22 for 100 ml vs $19.50 for 200 ml. And I wonder what they're using for propellant and how food safe it is?

I have a can that I still haven't used.

question on cost. Does anybody else use the el cheapo Badger airbrush that Norman Love uses? Have any of you gotten a chocolate + cocoa butter mixture to spray from these to get the velvet effect? It didn't work for me, but maybe I was doing it wrong.

Rather than buy a whole new brush, I just bought a can of the velvet spray stuff.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've not used them, so I can't comment on the usability. But they're definitely not very cost effective relative to the cocoa butters - $22 for 100 ml vs $19.50 for 200 ml. And I wonder what they're using for propellant and how food safe it is?

I have a can that I still haven't used.

question on cost. Does anybody else use the el cheapo Badger airbrush that Norman Love uses? Have any of you gotten a chocolate + cocoa butter mixture to spray from these to get the velvet effect? It didn't work for me, but maybe I was doing it wrong.

Rather than buy a whole new brush, I just bought a can of the velvet spray stuff.

You know for the velvet effect that the cocoa butter mixture should be warm and the chocolate item frozen?

Link to post
Share on other sites
question on cost.  Does anybody else use the el cheapo Badger airbrush that Norman Love uses?  Have any of you gotten a chocolate + cocoa butter mixture to spray from these to get the velvet effect?  It didn't work for me, but maybe I was doing it wrong. 

Rather than buy a whole new brush, I just bought a can of the velvet spray stuff.

I tried the canned stuff for velveting dessert components and it worked (you have to work with a frozen or very cold item to be sprayed as Kerry said) but it's just too expensive. Much more cost effective to buy pails of cocoa butter and a sprayer (I just use the ol' Wagner power sprayer) for that job unless it's a one time thing. For the chocolate/cocoa butter ratio, I started at the 1:1 that I'd read about and worked my way down from there until it started getting a bit difficult to work with. My goal was to use the minimum amount of additional cocoa butter that I could get away with and still get the result I want. The ratio can go surprisingly low without trouble if you keep the sprayer in a pan of warm water when not spraying. I've gone as low as 3 parts chocolate to 1 part cocoa butter but 2:1 is what I usually work with because the resulting shell seems to be of better texture on the plate. The 3:1 seemed to make a shell that wanted to flex and bend rather than cut or break. That's strictly based on observation though, no extensive testing or anything was done by me.

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites
You know for the velvet effect that the cocoa butter mixture should be warm and the chocolate item frozen?

Yeah, I tried that, but had problems getting it to work when I tried it. Maybe my temperature was too low. I tried a 2:1 chocolate:cocoa butter ratio. I've gotten straight cocoa butter to work on chocolates. But maybe (probably) I was doing it wrong . Will try again sometime.

Edited by ejw50 (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      MILLET GROATS CHOCOLATE CREME WITH CRANBERRY MOUSSE
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for the best chocolate crème I have ever eaten. It is thick, smooth and very chocolaty in flavour and colour. Despite the chocolate, the dessert isn't too sweet. But if somebody thinks that it is, I recommend serving it with slightly sour fruit mousse. You can use cherries, currants or cranberries. You will make an unusually yummy arrangement and your dessert will look beautiful.

      My children were delighted with this dessert. I told them about the fact it had been made with millet groats after they had eaten it, and ... they didn't believe me. Next time I will prepare the millet groats crème with a double portion of ingredients.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      chocolate crème
      100g of millet groats
      200g of dark chocolate
      1 tablespoon of dark cocoa
      250ml of almond milk
      fruit mousse
      250g of fresh cranberries
      juice and peel of one orange
      half a teaspoon of grated ginger
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Boil the millet groats in salty water and drain them. Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie. Blend the millet groats, chocolate, cocoa and milk very thoroughly until you have very smooth crème. Pour the milk in gradually to make the right consistency of your desert. Prepare the fruit mousse. Put the washed cranberries, ginger, juice orange peel and sugar into a pot. Boil until the fruits are soft. Blend. Put the chocolate crème into some small bowls. Put the fruit mousse on top. Decorate with peppermint leaves. Serve at once or chilled.

      Enjoy your meal!


    • By Lisa Shock
      The basic formula for these cakes was developed by the wife of a mayonnaise salesman in an effort to help him out. I did a bit of research, and have found many variations. Early variants generally involve using less cocoa, which I cannot recommend. Later variants involve using cold water instead of boiling, adding salt, and additional leaveners. I personally do not feel that any additional salt is needed, as mayonnaise and that famous, tangy brand of salad dressing (sometimes the label just says 'Dressing') both contain a fair amount of salt. If you are using homemade mayonnaise or a low sodium product, an eighth teaspoon of salt may boost the flavor a bit. And, of course, somewhere along the way fans who prefer a certain salad dressing over mayonnaise started using it to make this cake. Nowadays, the Hellman's website has a different formula -one with added eggs and baking powder. I have not tried this newer formulation.
       
      Some versions of this recipe specify sifted cake flour. This will result in a very light cake with virtually no structural integrity, due to the paucity of eggs in this recipe compared to a regular cake. Cupcakes made this way give beautifully light results. However, every time I try to make a traditional 8" double layer cake with cake flour, I experience collapse. I recommend AP flour or at least a mix of cake and pastry flour.
       
      I have never made this with a gluten-free flour replacer. This recipe does not have very much structural integrity and as such does not make a good candidate for a gluten-free cake.
       
      I have made this cake many times, the type of sandwich spread you choose will affect the outcome. Made with mayonnaise, the cake has a good chocolate flavor and moistness. Made with that famous, tangy, off-white salad dressing that gets used as a sandwich spread, the cake has a subtle bit of extra brightness to the flavor. If one chooses to use a vegan mayonnaise, the result is tasty but lacking a little in structure; I would bake this in a square pan and frost and serve from the pan.
       
      The cocoa you use will also affect the flavor.  For a classic, homey flavor use a supermarket brand of cocoa. To add a little sophistication, use better, artisan type cocoa and use chocolate extract instead of the vanilla extract.
       
      Supposedly, the traditional frosting for this cake should have a caramel flavor. Look for one where you actually caramelize some sugar first. Modern recipes for the icing seem like weak imitations to me; using brown sugar as the main flavor instead of true caramel.
       
      Chocolate Mayonnaise or Salad Dressing Cake
      makes enough for two 8" round pans, or a 9" square (about 7 cups of batter)
       
      2 ounces/56g unsweetened, non-alkalized cocoa
      1 cup/236g boiling water
      1 teaspoon/4g regular strength vanilla extract
      3/4 cup/162g mayonnaise, vegan mayonnaise, or salad dressing (the tangy, off-white, sandwich spread type dressing)
      10.5ounces/300g all-purpose flour
      7 ounces/200g sugar
      0.35ounce/10g baking soda
       
      Preheat your oven to 350°.
      Grease or spray two 8" round pans or an equivalent volume square or rectangle.
      Place the cocoa in a medium (4-5 cup) bowl. Add the hot water and stir with a fork to break up any clumps. Allow to cool down a little,  then add the vanilla extract and the mayonnaise or salad dressing spread. Beat well to eliminate lumps. In the bowl of an electric mixer or larger regular bowl if making by hand, sift in the flour and add the sugar and baking soda. Mix the dry ingredients to distribute evenly. Slowly beat in the cocoa mixture. Mix until the batter has an even color. Pour immediately into the pans. If making two 8" rounds, weigh them to ensure they contain equal amounts.
      Bake for approximately 20 minutes, or until the center of the top springs back when touched lightly. (The toothpick test does NOT work well on this moist cake!) Allow the cake to cool a little and shrink from the sides of the pan before removing. Removal is easier while still a little warm.
      Good with or without frosting.
      Good beginner cake for kids to make.
       
       
       
    • By Kasia
      I prepared two versions: the first one with desiccated coconut and blueberries and the second with dark chocolate and strawberries. Choose your favorite dessert or go crazy and make your own version.

      Bright dessert

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      200g of white chocolate
      100g of blueberries
      200ml of 30% sweet cream
      200ml of mascarpone cheese
      2 tablespoons of desiccated coconut

      Melt 150g of the white chocolate in a bain-marie. Draw six 8 cm circles on a sheet of baking paper. Put 2-3 tablespoons of chocolate on each of them and smear it around to cover the whole circle. Leave them at room temperature to congeal and then put them in the fridge for 2 hours. Melt the rest of the white chocolate in a bain-marie. Whisk the cream. Add the mascarpone cheese after whisking. Add the white chocolate and the desiccated coconut and stir thoroughly. Wash the blueberries and drain them. Put the first chocolate circles onto a plate, then a layer of the cream and a couple of blueberries and once again chocolate, cream and blueberries. Put the last chocolate circle on the top. 
      Decorate with the rest of the cream, fruit and peppermint leaves. Serve chilled.

      Dark dessert

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      200g of dark chocolate
      1 tablespoon of cocoa
      a couple of strawberries
      200ml of 30% sweet cream
      200ml of mascarpone cheese

      Melt 150g of the dark chocolate in a bain-marie. Draw six 8cm circles on a sheet of baking paper. Put 2-3 tablespoons of chocolate on each of them and smear it around to cover the whole circle. Leave them at room temperature to congeal and then put them in the fridge for 2 hours. Melt the rest of the dark chocolate in a bain-marie. Whisk the cream. Add the mascarpone cheese after whisking. Add the dark chocolate and the cocoa and stir thoroughly. Wash the strawberries and remove the shanks. Leave 3-4 nice bits of fruit for decoration, and cut the rest into small pieces. Put the first chocolate circles on a plate, then a layer of the cream and a couple of strawberry pieces and then once again chocolate, cream and strawberries. Put the last chocolate circle on the top. Decorate with the rest of the cream, fruit and peppermint leaves. Serve chilled.


    • By Kasia
      Chocolate cake with plums
       
      The first cake I ever dared to bake by myself was a chocolate cake. I have since baked it many times, always using the same recipe, and many times I have spoiled it at the beginning of preparation. It is necessary to cool down the chocolate mixture before adding the rest of the ingredients. On a hot summer day this process is very long, so I accelerated it by putting the pot with the mixture into some cold water in the kitchen sink. Many times, by mistake, I turned on the tap and poured water onto the cooling mixture. In hindsight these situations were amusing, but at the time it wasn't funny.

      This chocolate cake is excellent without any additives. You can enrich it with your favourite nuts or butter icing. Today I added some plums to the top of the cake. It was great and its sweet chocolate-plum aroma lingered long in my home.

      Ingredients (25cm cake tin):
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 tablespoons of cocoa
      120g of brown sugar
      15ml of almond milk
      100g of dark chocolate
      1 egg
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      plums

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Smooth the cake tin with the butter and sprinkle with dark cocoa.
      Put the butter, milk, sugar, cocoa and chocolate into the pan. Heat it until the chocolate is melted and all the ingredients have blended together well. Leave the mixture to cool down. Add the egg, flour and baking soda and mix them in. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the plums, cut them in half and remove the stones. Arrange the plum halves skin side down on top of the cake. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Lisa2k
      Lisa's Copycat recipe for Levain Bakery Chocolate Chip Walnut and Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter chip cookies
      Serves 12 as Dessert.
      After a few attempts, I think I finally cracked, or came close to cracking the Levain Bakery Chocolate Chip Walnut and Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter chip cookies. Mind you, I doubt I nailed their exact measurements, and maybe they use a flour other than AP (cake, pastry, or combos of flours), but they sure look, taste and 'feel' just like them. Enjoy!
      Lisa's Levain Bakery copycat Chocolate Chip Walnut Cookies (**Yields 1 dozen cookies)
      <center>
      <img src="http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/1206886386/gallery_59301_5864_40960.jpg">
      </center>
      Ingredients
      2 sticks 'cold and cubed' unsalted butter
      3/4 cup granulated sugar
      3/4 cup brown sugar
      2 eggs
      3 1/4 to 3 1/2 cups AP flour (feel the dough, it should be moist, kind of like cold cookie dough in a tube.. but not super sticky, so you can portion the cookies with your hands)
      3/4 teaspoon Kosher salt
      3/4-1 teaspoon baking powder ( I don't fill the tsp fully, hence the 3/4 tsp)
      1/4 tsp baking soda
      2 cups good quality semisweet chocolate chips or chunks (I used half semisweet and half milk chocolate)
      1 cup walnuts (I used macadamia since I was out of walnuts) Toast the nuts for more flavor, if desired.
      Directions
      Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In bowl of electric mixer fitted with paddle, cream together butter and sugars until well blended and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time.. and beat until well incorporated, then add flour, salt, baking soda, baking powder and mix until just combined. Gently fold in chocolate chunks and nuts. Transfer dough to clean work surface and gently mix dough by hand to ensure even distribution of ingredients. Divide into 12 equal portions, **about 4 oz each.. Place each on sheet pan lined with parchment paper and bake in the preheated oven 16-23 minutes depending on how gooey and raw'ish you like the middles (I bake mine at 375 for 18-20 minutes, as I prefer a less raw interior), until very lightly browned, taking care not to overbake. Let cool on rack and store what you don't immediately eat, in an airtight container. To freshen them after a few days (if they last that long), give them a quick nuke in the microwave for 5-10 seconds.
      ***Lisa's Levain Copycat Dark Chocolate Peanut butter Chip Cookies (**Yields 1 dozen cookies)
      <center>
      <img src="http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/1206903687/gallery_59301_5864_14712.jpg">
      </center>
      Ingredients
      2 sticks cold and cubed unsalted butter
      1 1/4 cup granulated sugar
      2 eggs
      1/4 to 1/2 cup good quality dark cocoa powder
      2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
      1/4 tsp Kosher salt
      3/4 to 1 teaspoon baking powder
      1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
      2 cups peanut butter chips
      Directions
      Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In bowl of electric mixer fitted with paddle, cream together butter and sugar until well blended and fluffy. Add eggs and beat until well-incorporated, then beat in cocoa powder. Mix in flour, salt and baking powder until just combined. Gently fold in remaining ingredients. Transfer dough to clean work surface and gently mix dough by hand to ensure even distribution of ingredients. Divide into 12 equal portions, **about 4 oz each, and place each on sheet pan lined with parchment paper. Bake in the preheated oven 16-20 minutes depending on how gooey and raw'ish you like the middles (I bake mine at 375 for 18 minutes, as I prefer a less raw'ish' interior), taking care not to overbake. . Let cool on a rack and store what you don't immediately eat, in an airtight container. To freshen them after a few days (if they last that long), give them a quick nuke in the microwave for 5-10 seconds.
      ** - The Levain Bakery uses 6 oz of cookie dough per cookie.. If you want 12 cookies out of the above recipes, a little over 4 oz per cookie (4.1 to 4.2 oz. Use a kitchen scale) will get you that. If you want to use 6 oz of cookie dough per cookie, you'll probably get only 6-8 cookies. However, a little over 4 oz makes a cookie just as thick and huge, so you don't even notice the difference.
      *** - Regarding the Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter cookies. I used Dutch-process cocoa. If you use basic, natural unsweetened cocoa (you know, your basic Hershey's in the brown can or whatever), add 1/4 tsp baking soda to the dry ingredients. Also, if they're too 'chocolatey' and rich for you, use only 1/4 cup cocoa powder, and add 1/4 cup extra flour.
      Note1 - The Levain Bakery doesn't use vanilla extract in their cookies, as they feel it's unecessary. However, some feel you need it. You can add 1 tsp to each recipe if desired. Just add it after each egg is incorporated.
      Note2 - If you like a more 'brown sugary' chocolate chip cookie, increase the brown sugar and decrease the white sugar, so you still have a total of 1 1/2 cups sugar total.
      Keywords: Dessert, Cookie, Easy, American, Chocolate, Snack
      ( RG2116 )
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...