• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

rotuts

Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment, 2012

918 posts in this topic

[Moderator's note: this continues discussion from Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment, 2011]

Im trying a new thing for me:

I went to Chinatown West ( Alliston ) on Sunday and got some interesting thing:

I got 'pork belly w skin' ie I think bacon with what you start with with skin.

i decided to to two things:

Char Siu and black bean with garlic for the two preps

these came from a Jar ( huh.gif) but we work are one ways.

id like to SV each of these for real tenderness the take out and "char"

I plant to use each for at least stir fried riec

do I use:

160 for 24 hrs or maybe 155?

im looking for max tenderness then a quick Char on the grill

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Straw poll: What would we think of wild moose shoulder, previously frozen then pre-seared and cooked sous vide at 52°C for 48 hours?

As I understand it, 52°C is at the very bottom end of pasteurization temperatures - and below where I would feel comfortable eating the meat - but the freezing and pre-sear should help reduce pathogen populations pretty far to begin with. The other question is whether 52°C is hot enough to convert the collagen to gelatin in a reasonable length of time. Thoughts?


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think that the same concerns with respect to venison (mushy and gamy with long SV cooking) would apply to moose as well.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I Think the Party line on the Past. is 55 C similar to 130 F. how long at 130 is a matter of thickness etc.

Deer in some parts of the country but not Moose I think have become infected with a "slow wasting disease" whether thats a 'Slow virus' or what ever beets me.

Hunting licenses fees in those states are down considerably another blow to local gov.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deer in some parts of the country but not Moose I think have become infected with a "slow wasting disease" whether thats a 'Slow virus' or what ever beets me.

Are you thinking of chronic wasting disease? That's a prion disease, so cooking won't stop it anyway.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prions in the day were sometimes called Slow virus' think Kuru.

thanks for the clarification.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Followup from cooking the venison loin sous vide...

I used the Modernist Cuisine method of setting the water bath to 149 and cooking to a core temp of 133. I was able to use the awesome Sous Vide Dash app for the iPad to correctly estimate exactly how long it would take to come to that temp. The beautiful results are below...

hFKUa.jpg

My family and I agreed that it was the best venison we've ever had, and we also agreed it was one of the best pieces of meat we'd ever had. I ended up cooking another loin like this a few days later.

In more unfortunate news, some inept jackass TSA agent took it upon himself to repack my suitcase, moving the immersion circulator I had laying on its side packed around soft clothes so it was screen-up at the top of the suitcase. Here's what it looked like when I arrived at my parent's house

TpVBA.jpg

Polyscience will be replacing the screen and not charging me for the labor, and I have to open a complaint with TSA to try to recoup the money

[edited for clarity]


Edited by therippa (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I think I would increase it to 55C, both for safety and to better convert the collagen to gelatin.

For farm-raised animals, we all hope, at least, that the interior of the meat is sterile, but for an animal in the woods, that might not always be the case. Two animals could get in a fight, a nasty cut could ensure, and pathogens spread through the rest of the body, carried by the blood. In addition, it sounds like you weren't the hunter, so you may not know where the moose was shot, or how it was dressed out.

Pre-searing or blanching should take care of the pathogens on the outside OK, I'll grant. But freezing won't do a thing, at least at temperatures that you were likely to use. Trichinosis is no longer a problem in domestic pork, although feral hogs and particularly bears are often infected. Tapeworms and other parasites are a possible problem, particularly in wild-caught fish that hasn't been frozen to at least -30C. I THINK that long-term cooking would destroy such parasites as well as any bacterial pathogens, but I'm not entirely sure.

I've never had moose, but I would assume it would be rather similar to elk. Unfortunately, the last elk I shot was back in the pre-SV days, so I have no experience to offer. (We were about 200 miles from the closest town or gas station, on the Utah/Colorado border, at 9000 ft., a raging snowstorm was coming in, and we had to get out of there with all of our gear, pronto. After gutting it, we ended up taking a chain saw and cutting the animal in half through the belly, and stuffing the two parts on both sides of the ATV, on the back of a pickup, and high-tailing it down the mountain, with no guard rails and 1000 ft drops offs. When we got to the butcher, he said it had to be the worst job of field dressing that he had ever seen!)

Anyway, I think I would cook a moose shoulder the same way I do beef brisket, at 55C for at least 48 hours. Then try it, and if it isn't sufficiently tender, cook it another 24 hours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In more unfortunate news, some inept jackass TSA agent took it upon himself to repack my suitcase, moving the immersion circulator I had laying on its side packed around soft clothes so it was screen-up at the top of the suitcase. Here's what it looked like when I arrived at my parent's house.

FWIW, I have never had any trouble traveling with my circulator in my carry-on baggage. I would never think of packing it in checked baggage.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I scored some nice pork belly w skin at a chinese market W. of Boston. it was cut about 2.5 - 3" thick

I left the skin on and plan to SV w two different 'sauces' both from jars ( :blink: )

One will be black bean and garlic, the other Char Sui.

For the char sui I cut the slabs tinner ( in 1/2 ) but for the BBG I left it thick. I cut each in 1/2 length wise.

then I bagged them and let them 'co-mingle' in a cold refig. and will SV today

my plan is 155 for 24 hours. Baldwin suggests 160 24.

Your thoughts on the time and temp? each 'bag' ends up being the same thinkness and weight.

After SV my plan would be CSui: hot grill to char, then eat and save. For the BBG the same thing but those will be sliced thin and added to 'fried rice' etc.

Will the skin be tender and edible as above?

Many thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In more unfortunate news, some inept jackass TSA agent took it upon himself to repack my suitcase, moving the immersion circulator I had laying on its side packed around soft clothes so it was screen-up at the top of the suitcase. Here's what it looked like when I arrived at my parent's house.

FWIW, I have never had any trouble traveling with my circulator in my carry-on baggage. I would never think of packing it in checked baggage.

I certainly would have survived the way I originally had it packed, but yes, next time I'm going to take it carry-on...might even buy one of their travel bags for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone here ever Sous Vide a 20-28 day dry age Rib Roast and leave the outer layer of age. Usually I dry age it and cut the outside off. But I think cooking long enough and a post sear, that outer dry aged edge might provide and interesting, nice dry aged result?

Been think of making an aged rib cap roll.

Paul


Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone here ever Sous Vide a 20-28 day dry age Rib Roast and leave the outer layer of age. Usually I dry age it and cut the outside off. But I think cooking long enough and a post sear, that outer dry aged edge might provide and interesting, nice dry aged result?

Been think of making an aged rib cap roll.

Paul

In my opinion, if you have a nice dry-aged rib roast SV would not be the way to cook it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

28 days.. Produces a pretty dessicated edge . Probably a true edge aged funky thing ( as noted ). I was just thinking by Sous Vide I could get back some moisture in the edge, then a light blow torch re-sear after cooking.

Crazy, but still listening.

Me


Its good to have Morels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice Knife.. :wink:


Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, I got my dad that knife for father's day a couple years back, he loves it too.

I let the second loin rest longer, there was much less loss...though even with all that juice on the cutting board, it was still verrrrry moist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I made a rib-eye steak sous vide and finished it in my new cast iron skillet. My normal method is to finish on my gas BBQ grill at very high heat and direct flame. I was underwhelmed by the skillet method. Am I expecting too much or did I do something wrong? I put a little peanut oil in the skillet and got it smoking hot, put the patted dry steak in for about 90 seconds per side. Got some browning, mostly on the edges, but not what I'd call a good char and the flavor was bland.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided to cook a ribeye (about 2kg) in my sous vide setup yesterday. I set my Sous Vide Magic to 55C, coated the ribeye with a mixture of rosemary, sage, oregano, garlic, salt and olive oil, vacuum sealed it up, and cooked it for 4 hours or so. Took it out, completely incredulous that it would be cooked through, but it was PERFECT (I cut the ribeye into two pieces and the centre was perfectly pink and beautiful). I then put the beef in the fridge to cool completely and sliced it as thin as I could manage to serve as open-faced sandwiches to some guests today. I got more compliments about that beef and how beautiful it looked than I ever expected. I don't think I'll ever cook beef in the oven again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided to cook a ribeye (about 2kg) in my sous vide setup yesterday. I set my Sous Vide Magic to 55C, coated the ribeye with a mixture of rosemary, sage, oregano, garlic, salt and olive oil, vacuum sealed it up, and cooked it for 4 hours or so. Took it out, completely incredulous that it would be cooked through, but it was PERFECT (I cut the ribeye into two pieces and the centre was perfectly pink and beautiful). I then put the beef in the fridge to cool completely and sliced it as thin as I could manage to serve as open-faced sandwiches to some guests today. I got more compliments about that beef and how beautiful it looked than I ever expected. I don't think I'll ever cook beef in the oven again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided to cook a ribeye (about 2kg) in my sous vide setup yesterday. I set my Sous Vide Magic to 55C, coated the ribeye with a mixture of rosemary, sage, oregano, garlic, salt and olive oil, vacuum sealed it up, and cooked it for 4 hours or so. Took it out, completely incredulous that it would be cooked through, but it was PERFECT (I cut the ribeye into two pieces and the centre was perfectly pink and beautiful). I then put the beef in the fridge to cool completely and sliced it as thin as I could manage to serve as open-faced sandwiches to some guests today. I got more compliments about that beef and how beautiful it looked than I ever expected. I don't think I'll ever cook beef in the oven again!

Try what would normally be a more chewy cut of beef (eg topside, I think we use similar cut names in NZ and Oz) at the same temperature for a longer time. Then use that as sliced rare roast beef. It will be the reddest, juiciest, and most tasty cold beef you will ever had have.


Edited by nickrey (log)

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its Chuck for me. I deconstruct in into indiviudual muscles ( so get the largest chuck you can find) so that I can orient the grain. then I use 131 for 48 - 72 hours.

finest roast beef ever, hot with mash or cold sliced thin for ..... everything!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.