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Chris Amirault

Bad Condiments You Love

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Maggi Seasoning. I'm not sure why I consider it so much more ghetto than normal soy sauce, but I love the stuff.

Yes!! Another Maggi-lover! I can't eat boiled or fried eggs without Maggi, it's so good. Such a cheerful-looking bottle too. :wub:

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Oh I'd be the first to say Ice Magic has a place in this thread.

Some of the above products are either a lot of work to make or nearly impossible to duplicate, but Ice Magic takes about 4 minutes to make and must be cheaper to make...although I have never purchased it. 100 g or coconut oil melted plus 150 g of melted chocolate, a smidgen of salt and there you have it. I make it all the time. It's a 'kid' sort of thing, but I love it.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Is this the place where I can talk about Taco Bell hot sauce? Because the lovely folks always give us too much, and I bring it home and store the packets in my pantry. I use them on many things, including my own homemade bean burritos, various breakfast dishes, grilled cheese, arroz con pollo... No, the bottled taco sauce from the grocery store doesn't cut it, either. That was my first attempt at solving this issue. The second best taco sauce is La Victoria Salsa Brava, Hot.

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Wendy's chili sauce packets....the kind that come in the little gold packets. Love it.

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French dressing. It's the one holdover from my childhood that I have to get on a basic iceberg lettuce salad.


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French's Spicy Brown. I have all kinds of different fancy brown mustards in the fridge, but the French's is the only one that seems to get used for some reason (when I'm not just using the yellow).

La Victoria green taco sauce, too. Sometimes I'll get a burrito from a local taco truck, bring it home and douse it in this refined, authentic sauce. (And I like the Taco Bell hot, too. Not the fire, not the medium, but hot.)

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There is no ketchup other than Heinz.

MelissaH

edited because I can't type today


Edited by MelissaH (log)

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Depends on what the condiment accompanies. Some of my favs:

With a Syd's style hot dog (Best Provisions of Newark), I mixed equal parts hoagie spread (chopped hot peppers) and dill pickle relish (not sweet relish). Mustard and kraut top the dog, too.

Dirty-water dog: Sabrett's onion sauce (also good on Wisconsin brats).

Belgian style frites: mayo, tartar or aioli.

Cheap steak: A-1 or HP.

Good steak: compound butter.

Ham and cheese sandwich: Branston pickles.

Pastrami sandwich: pickled plum tomato.

Egg rolls: cheap Chinese mustard.

Hot soft pretzels: melted butter and German style mustard.

Tuna salad sandwich: jarred pimento-stuffed green olives (can also be chopped as topping for sandwich).


Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

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Is Ice Magic the same thing as Magic Shell?

I also love Heinz 57 sauce and Catalina dressing.

and Texas Pete Chili for hotdogs (a product that oddly enough contains no meat)

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Is Ice Magic the same thing as Magic Shell?

Yes


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Arby's horsey sauce and bbq sauce. I always ask for extra packets to take home, and I put BOTH on my roast beef sandwiches.

Neon green poppy seed dressing. The creamy white kind doesn't taste as good.

Gravy-from-a-can on potatoes-from-a-box when I'm drunk.


"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Frederico Fellini

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Another vote for Arby's sauce.

and the mustard they sell at the dollar store, Koops?

that stuff goes on everything. Can't imagine eating a burger,dog, or brat without it.

my vegetarian mom loves it on a cheese sandwich.


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The cheese packets you get (if you ask for them when you order) from dominos pizza. If you camp, they're great on scrambled eggs and beat hauling a piece of parm around....but at home I hoard them to sprinkle on stale buttered french bread (you know, the extra loaf bought at the supermarket cause it smelled so good coming out of the oven?) halved, and browned. No need to add anything but i might put a little more garlic powder with it if we're having spagetti.

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There is no ketchup other than Heinz.

I dare you to try Hunts side-by-side, blindfolded...

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Heinz Ketchup.

Gulden's Brown Mustard.

French's Yellow Mustard.

Hellmann's Extra Heavy Mayonnaise.

Soy Sauce - I'd tell you what brand if I could read Chinese (a Malaysian friend who owns a restaurant gets it for me).

There's always honey butter, chive butter, garlic butter and bleu cheese butter in the fridge.

Theresa :smile:


"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

- Abraham Lincoln

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Heinz Ketchup.

Gulden's Brown Mustard.

French's Yellow Mustard.

Hellmann's Extra Heavy Mayonnaise.

Soy Sauce - I'd tell you what brand if I could read Chinese (a Malaysian friend who owns a restaurant gets it for me).

There's always honey butter, chive butter, garlic butter and bleu cheese butter in the fridge.

Theresa :smile:

What is this 'extra heavy' of which you speak? :wink: I've only ever seen regular Hellman's (and all that modified stuff, low fat, lite, etc. which doesn't count.)Sounds like a good thing to me!


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Heinz Ketchup.

Gulden's Brown Mustard.

French's Yellow Mustard.

Hellmann's Extra Heavy Mayonnaise.

Soy Sauce - I'd tell you what brand if I could read Chinese (a Malaysian friend who owns a restaurant gets it for me).

There's always honey butter, chive butter, garlic butter and bleu cheese butter in the fridge.

Theresa :smile:

What is this 'extra heavy' of which you speak? :wink: I've only ever seen regular Hellman's (and all that modified stuff, low fat, lite, etc. which doesn't count.)Sounds like a good thing to me!

Extra Heavy mayonnaise is a deli-type of mayo. I've only seen it in the gi-normous gallon or 5 quart size. A couple of years ago, I went to a grocery outlet and saw the gallons for $4.00 each, so I bought a few. We have a large family, so with all the birthday/etc. parties, it went fast. This last gallon I bought at a restaurant supply store that also sells to the public, and used wide-mouth mason jars to split it with my sister.

Here's a link to a post on Serious Eats, which describes what it is -

http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2008/11/extra-heavy-mayonnaise.html

It's denser in taste and texture than regular Hellmann's. For use on sandwiches, you can spread a little less on the bread and get the same flavor as a normal portion of regular mayo, but it's best use is for salads.

Theresa :smile:


"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

- Abraham Lincoln

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There is no ketchup other than Heinz.

I dare you to try Hunts side-by-side, blindfolded...

Trader Joe's Organic Ketchup got me off the Heinz' train the first time I tried it. The stuff is awesome enough to eat with a spoon. Never like Hunt's, although their canned tomatoes are fine. But TJ's Organic goes with me to the desert island.


--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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