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thayes1c

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  1. thayes1c

    Onion Sugar

    What about adding a pinch of baking soda to the onions? It speeds the browning and breaks down the onions faster, turning it jammy pretty quickly. From there it may be easier to dehydrate without burning. Ed: oh, I reread it and realized you don't want to caramelize or use whole onions. Well, shoot. I don't know how to help.
  2. Schmaltz has that same animal fat fullness of lard and adds a little flavor like lard does. It is different, but I think that if you dont eat pork but want to get close to type flavor that's the way to go. I have the updated book, and it's alright, but I think Rick Bayless's Authentic Mexican is more approachable and wider ranging.
  3. I know you said off strip, but there's a "secret" pizza place in the Cosmopolitan that is faaaaaaantastic. It's on the third floor, down a hallway covered with old album covers. Really great crust, excellent meatball pizza. Best (and cheapest) meal on the strip.
  4. thayes1c

    Fake Bacon

    Don't know about bacon, but soy-rizo is as good (and has less dodgy ingredients) as those cheap tubes of Mexican chorizo. Great with eggs and potatoes for tacos.
  5. Death in the Afternoon (absinthe and champagne), followed by Fernet and cola the next day (the absolute best "recovery" drink).
  6. thayes1c

    What's an Airline Chicken Breast?

    So it's another term for supreme?
  7. thayes1c

    Korean Cookbooks

    You ought enjoy the Momofuku cookbook. It's not entirely Korean, but a lot of the recipes are Korean inflected. It's an all around good book to have.
  8. Do you enjoy food or find it to be nothing more than a source of fuel, and a burdensome source at that? It sounds like you are not overly familiar with cooking and are approaching your cookbook as some kind of engineering problem. It would be far easier to source, make and taste your recipes than to "obtain theoretical knowledge" about taste. Your readers will thank you for your efforts, if your premise doesn't produce the grimoire of dreadful recipes I am imagining it will.
  9. thayes1c

    Masa as Thickener

    I've made masa dumplings with quest fresco mixed in and that improved them quite a bit. A good shake of garlic powder helped, too. Matzo balls are much airier, probably because of the gluten and the egg binder, not to mention the structure inherent in the matzo meal. Some people add baking powder or seltzer to make their matzo balls lighter, but I find that gentle handling makes for good, airy balls. I don't know if those tips would translate to masa dumplings, but maybe you could make "masa meal" with dried out tortillas and use that to make dumplings. Hmm. I may have to try that...
  10. thayes1c

    Cooking with beer

    This is a great suggestion thayes1c, thanks! However, it did make me laugh; my gravely republican Irish family will surely disown/eviscerate me if I keep the name. I'll think of an alias...
  11. thayes1c

    Cooking with beer

    I make a Black and Tan chile with a bottle of Pilsner and a bottle of coffee stout. Not all the beer makes it in the pot, of course, but I think it adds a good flavor.
  12. It encompasses more than just Mexican cuisine, but Gran Cocina Latina by Maricel Presilla is a great resource. If you're interested in this kind of cooking you're sure to enjoy it. And I second the Kennedy and Bayless suggestions. Kennedy's Oaxaca book is particularly "authentic".
  13. thayes1c

    Eugene Oregon

    Have you tried the Falling Sky deli? They make great pastrami and they have a good number of deli staples you can buy to go. And good beer! Noisette in downtown Eugene makes a baguette that my wife says is as good as the ones she's had in Paris. Good sweets, too. Have you tried Marche for your bistro fix? I also moved from Eugene to Springfield, and I think the only places I buy dinner from on this side of the river are pizza places.
  14. I did it! Six hours on a Sunday and I was able to do the whole recipe. I didn't bother making stock his way, because ever since moving to the pressure cooker for stock I don't think I can go back. I used katsuobushi for all the fish, since it's all I could find. I did the soffrito at 300 and it still took 5 hours, so I'd definitely turn the temp upon that. I also just added oil until it felt right instead of using a whole liter and I still wound up draining a ton off. I wasn't going to make the egg soak until I realized I could just use the pork cooking liquid, and the flavor really makes the eggs special. I also changed up the menma a bit, subbing a cup of dashi and a splash of the pork liquid for the broth he has you make to cook the shoots.The double soup is incredible, and the katsuobushi salt and schmaltz really punch up the bowl. Completely worth the effort, and definitely the best bowl of ramen I've ever had! I almost didn't stop to take a picture, because he's do insistent on eating the soup volcanically hot, but I'll be damned if I don't get some evidence of all that work!
  15. Shizuo Tsuji (Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art) instructs: remove heads and entrails of dried sardines, or it will make the stock bitter (making niboshi dashi). I think that's where I read about cleaning them, but I'm just wondering because Orkin doesn't mention this step, and he seems to have gone to great lengths to make these recipes exactly like they are at his shops. Anybody make the dashi and note a bitterness?
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