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Guitar cutter: Sourcing, Using, Maintaining


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Thought I'd share my trials with a guitar cutter! I had a friend make one for me ( he can make anything!) 

we tested about 20 different wires and eventually after a lot of research piano wire is the best, I also called Vantage house to ask what they use and they said it is basically piano wire

I find the easiest way to clean it is to remove as much debris and then I spray with lots of sanitizer leave it a few minutes and then I use a hand held steamer which makes light wrk of the grooves! Plus the steamer ensures it is safe and hygienic ( which always makes me happy) 

I only chablonage when the ganache is too soft and it helps with moving it around

image.jpg

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9 minutes ago, rotuts said:

very interesting

 

what then do you do with the 'strips?'  

 

pics are always nice

 

pasta I can understand ......

Sorry I'm not sure what you mean by strips or pasta? 

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Je33, that looks great!  Is there a reason why you don't just wash it?  I have a dedy and just run each piece through the restaurant dish machine. 

 

Rotuts, I didn't think pasta chittarras had the cutting base, were rather wires that the dough is pushed through from the top?  With the confectionery guitar, most of us pick the strips up, rotate and cut into squares. I use mine to cut truffles that are then coated in cocoa powder, cut pate de fruits, and I frequently use the wires to mark portions on things to be cut by hand  

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9 hours ago, Je33 said:

Thought I'd share my trials with a guitar cutter! I had a friend make one for me ( he can make anything!) 

we tested about 20 different wires and eventually after a lot of research piano wire is the best, I also called Vantage house to ask what they use and they said it is basically piano wire

I find the easiest way to clean it is to remove as much debris and then I spray with lots of sanitizer leave it a few minutes and then I use a hand held steamer which makes light wrk of the grooves! Plus the steamer ensures it is safe and hygienic ( which always makes me happy) 

I only chablonage when the ganache is too soft and it helps with moving it around

image.jpg

That looks very neat! Any chance of a few more photos showing how it is constructed/put together?

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  • 4 months later...

I am looking for advice on cutting diamond shapes on a guitar.  I have seen a video from Bakon showing this procedure, but it is a very quick view.  In that video it looked as if the shapes from the first cut were ordinary strips the length of the ganache.  Then they were placed at an angle, the strips staggered in their positions (each strip placed at a different spot on the guitar base).  Is there some way to calculate the angle and the positioning of the strips for the second cut, or is it just a hit-or-miss procedure?  Thanks for any help.

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Another question on guitars:  I know that cutting ganache containing coconut or nuts is not wise, but what about caramelized cocoa nibs?  I assume that is also risky.  Any thoughts?  I would like to have the nibs as part of the ganache but could use them as decoration on the finished top instead.  That sounds better than fixing a broken guitar wire.

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1 hour ago, Chris Hennes said:

I'd think that you run exactly the same risks with nibs as with nuts, and maybe even more so. Your safe bet is definitely to add after cutting, I'd think.

 

+1

 

if pretzels and too-firm gianduja both will break multiple strings at once (which I know from experience >:( ), nibs would be a disaster. Best case scenario would be that they caught on the strings and pulled through the ganache, but that would still be a disaster. 

 

Sprinkle on top either before or after dipping, but definitely after cutting!

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  • 1 month later...

Anyone have any ideas about sourcing replacement bolts?

 

Our Dedy guitar frames have bolts with a drilled shank, through which you pass the wire and then tighten around.

 

Several times now, the threads of the bolts/frame hole catch momentarily against each other while tightening, and the shank snaps off along the drilled hole, where the material is thinnest.

 

We have enough frames that we've been able to get by cannibalizing less-used frames, but I've been looking for a source to stock up a replacement inventory.

 

Any ideas? I've had inquiries in to TCF and other vendors but no leads yet.

 

The problem I see is that the drilled shanks are "custom" - with the hole about 6mm/0.25in below the head, whereas all bolt vendors seem to offer drilled shanks with the hole drilled just above the end of the bolt.

 

Thanks!

guitar-bolt.JPG

Brian Ibbotson

Pastry Sous for Production and Menu Research & Development

Sous Chef for Food Safety and Quality Assurance

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I've emailed TCF and Dedy and am waiting to hear from them, but I was wondering if anyone here already had a source.

 

Our guitar was purchased long before I was hired, so any extra bolts we had are a distant memory. TCF was a great source for replacing the pick-up tray that had been lost.

Brian Ibbotson

Pastry Sous for Production and Menu Research & Development

Sous Chef for Food Safety and Quality Assurance

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  • 5 months later...
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