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Guitar cutter: Sourcing, Using, Maintaining


Gary
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1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

Are you in Canada?  Design & Realisation has it.  If you're cutting normal reasonably soft ganache, the thinner gauge should be fine.

 

https://dr.ca/products/replacement-wire-for-guitar-cutters?variant=32517446172743

 

I am 2 hrs north of Vancouver - my plan is to use it for ganache and now that I have it I am going to try marshmallows and some layered ganaches.  I like my silicone molds for caramel as the rounded shape is a perfect mouth feel and I boil to 265F so you cant feall chew them they are more of a suckable piece.  I have posted in chocolate groups on FB and I think it is a Maratello - an older version but it is solid!  It is on top of my table saw and takes up a lot of space - I don't think I will be making slabs that big but you never know. 

 

I am going to try making my own frame rails with wood, which I have plenty of.  I am getting into making chopping boards and I finish them with a 2:1 blend of mineral oil and bees wax - I get the wax and honey from a neighbour and trade caramels for it.  its food safe and if I put a couple of coats on it water beads off so I think it will work  Thx for the help.  And I watched your videos on changing the wires - mine is going to be a bit more challenging especially with no manual - I can screw anything up so I got this! lol

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I think it's a Martellato. That's a good price with 4 frames. 

 

I got wire from Brafasco for a good price. Looks like TCF has from 0.5 to 0.8 - I can't find the listing on Brafasco right now - I think I might have wandered in to the store. 

 

If you are cutting caramel - get a nice heavy gauge piano/fishing wire I'd say. 

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8 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I think it's a Martellato. That's a good price with 4 frames. 

 

I got wire from Brafasco for a good price. Looks like TCF has from 0.5 to 0.8 - I can't find the listing on Brafasco right now - I think I might have wandered in to the store. 

 

If you are cutting caramel - get a nice heavy gauge piano/fishing wire I'd say. 

HI Kerry - I am probably not going to use it to cut caramel with as I am quite happy with my silicone molds - 15 of them now. 

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My principal difficulty with using a guitar is the "when"--knowing when to cut the slab.  I find it very difficult to select that brief period of time when the slab is not too squishy that it will be mashed rather than cut cleanly and when it is so firm that it will break a wire.  I have broken only one, and that was with a gianduja that I allowed to sit for just a bit too long (the gianduja is paired with a coffee layer, which never gets really firm).  I use a tiny knife and stick it into the item in various places.  My wire replacement experience has led me to cut too early, as the evidence on the wires shows, but by then it's too late.  Of course larger slabs are more prone to breaking wires, and sometimes I cut those in half before using the guitar.  I have also learned that refrigerating the slab takes very careful monitoring as it is so easy to overdo the chilling.

 

Any hints on how to judge the right moment?

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11 hours ago, Jim D. said:

My principal difficulty with using a guitar is the "when"--knowing when to cut the slab.  I find it very difficult to select that brief period of time when the slab is not too squishy that it will be mashed rather than cut cleanly and when it is so firm that it will break a wire.  I have broken only one, and that was with a gianduja that I allowed to sit for just a bit too long (the gianduja is paired with a coffee layer, which never gets really firm).  I use a tiny knife and stick it into the item in various places.  My wire replacement experience has led me to cut too early, as the evidence on the wires shows, but by then it's too late.  Of course larger slabs are more prone to breaking wires, and sometimes I cut those in half before using the guitar.  I have also learned that refrigerating the slab takes very careful monitoring as it is so easy to overdo the chilling.

 

Any hints on how to judge the right moment?

Hi Jim - I only just got the guitar and I have never used one before - ever - so I am no help sorry.   Your experience and comments are actually helping me.  I don't even have a recipe I want to try yet but i am thinking of doing something layered from my Fine Chocolate Gold book.  I just watched a video by Callebaut that mentions a few things and tips about preparing the slab for cutting - My garage is my fridge which I keep at 15C from now till about May. I also have a wine fridge and full size fridge in there as well - plenty of storage and I am on the lookout for a rolling rack to store more sheet pans. 

 

I don't even have a pick up sheet or frame rails yet either.  My plan is to get a baking sheet from the thrift store and Mcgyver it into a pickup sheet. Cost $2-5 max.I I have all the tools to do this.   For frame rails i am going to use some scrap maple wood I have and finish is with my board butter which I make with mineral oil and beeswax.  I use this to finish the chopping boards I make and it is a food safe finish - cost $0 as I already have everything to make them.   I will post some pics of them when i have made them.  I would do it tomorrow but my town is going back to the stone age - BC Hydro is doing a major upgrade and the power to the whole town is being shut off from 9am to 5 pm.  Every single business in town is closing for the day - no tv, internet, etc. 

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