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Foraging for favorites


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36 minutes ago, sverreef said:

 

I would never have made a comparison of cloudberries and honey. They both have floral and bitter flavour notes, so once you cook the cloudberries, the similarities may become more pronounced. I can't remember the last time I had cooked cloudberries (jams/compotes) though. Not that I don't like it. Fresh or uncooked berries are just 

 

In other foraging news, chanterelle season has been amazing so far in my area:

 

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I've probably picked about 10kg of cleaned chanterelles so far, so now I'm stocked up on dried, cooked and (my take on) creamed chanterelles. No luck finding any Boletus edulis yet though...

 

 

 

Lucky foraging area. Can you share your general location?

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2 hours ago, TicTac said:

Are you looking for clarification on which/what?

 

(or are you just being a smart ass grammar police?!) ;)

Mind your manners, junior. 

 

I was questioning the medicinal benefits you claim for weeds. And don't cite Dr Mercola. 

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11 hours ago, gfweb said:

Mind your manners, junior. 

 

I was questioning the medicinal benefits you claim for weeds. And don't cite Dr Mercola. 

Apologies, gramps. 

 

You never know when someone is trying to be a wise guy or is genuinely interested, especially given how text can so easily be misconstrued.

 

Google is a great tool if you are seriously interested to learn more, but to help get you started...

 

https://theherbalacademy.com/plantain-leaf-benefits-recipes/

 

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/red-raspberry-leaf-tea#bottom-line

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3934766/

 

What you consider 'weeds' - many are actually not only edible, but extremely beneficial from a health perspective.  Check out Lambs Quarters (a common 'weed') and compare its nutritional values to say, spinach. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, TicTac said:

What you consider 'weeds' - many are actually not only edible, but extremely beneficial from a health perspective.  Check out Lambs Quarters (a common 'weed') and compare its nutritional values to say, spinach. 

 

As with many foods I see the value in variety. which foraging affords. Also the immediate freshness versus transport for miles food. The effort needed to keep broccoli fresh to market for instance. Whole lotta chilling and icing. I also find foraging emotionally satisfying - giving us power in a world where we have little of it.  With some foods we forage there is the feel of maintaining traditions as well.  For me in this drought ridden place it is usually just dandelion, mallow, and ustard with the occasional "wild" fruits/berries.

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Terroir is a glorious thing. :)

 

One slightly OT tip: Next time you're out harvesting dandelions for your wine, look for the clusters of immature, hazelnut-sized buds clustered in the heart of each "crown" of leaves. It takes a while to harvest enough for a meal, but they're a lovely spring vegetable. Also, if you spot a few nice, big crowns in early spring, blanch them by covering them with a piece of plywood or a few large sheets of cardboard. The blanched greens are crisp like romaine, very mild, and a great salad green.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 10/10/2022 at 1:38 PM, Senior Sea Kayaker said:

Out for a short hike this morning and found these

 

Where was your hike?  We've found these, around this time of year, on the dunes of Cape Cod.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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King's look like a good ID for them.  Lucky duck.  Still looking for the elusive king; should see some slippery jack's pop up in the next 1-2 weeks.  Elm Oyster season is about to boom - will head into the woods with my oldest guy on the weekend and report back.

 

 

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@TicTac 

 

Nice !

 

I admire mushroom foragers .

 

Ive live in FR and SP  and its a calling.

 

in my area , there is an ElmBank , 1/2 very wooded , 

 

where I used to take my Lab Ridge for walks 

 

6:00 AM ,  4 or so doggers would show up , and walk their dogs 

 

in an area w no cars.

 

but the wooded areas has all sorts of mushrooms.

 

 particular fall or PeakMushroomSeason

 

several families arrived , with a deep history of 

 

mushrooming in central europe.

 

they asked me about this one and the other one

 

had a seen them ?

 

and they left w quite a haul of mushrooms that would 

 

otherwise , have been recycled , for the next year.

 

Ive seen groups of button ( brown ones ) in the fields 

 

w/o many trees , but chose to leave them a long.

 

as I had a wood stove , and got ' fresh ' logs back then

 

I got very close to getting mushroom plugs

 

for those fresh logs. 

 

Im fine w what's at MarketBasket 

 

these days.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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On 10/10/2022 at 7:38 PM, Senior Sea Kayaker said:

Out for a short hike this morning and found these:

 

DSCN0345.thumb.JPG.d16a0ba41189a489bdccfbf24b737f8d.JPG

 

 

 

That one looked absolutely flawless! I definitely need to make a last ditch effort to find some Boletes next weekend. For the past couple of weeks I've been focusing on Craterellus tubaeformis.

 

image.png.399c78a8f48e10398ad0f205a1d35119.png

 

Sunday's trip resulted in 1,4 kg cleaned mushrooms, including a few Craterellus lutescens, but I could easily have picked twice or three times that amount.


image.thumb.png.18f7ce8848c8318fca821c93dbb9b0bc.png

 

I also picked a few Hydnum repandum a copule of weeks ago:

 

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That's a pretty high number for 30 days in essentially the area of one state. There is no verified mention of what mushrooms were eaten But it stands to reason that if there's been rain lately during the late summer and fall months, there will be a variety of fruiting shrooms that may not be easily identified by amateur foragers. 

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11 hours ago, gfweb said:

 

Given it's a children's hospital, presumably the victims were kids. Schools and parents need to be more aware of potential problems and educate the kids. Chances are, as the article hints, the kids were looking for psychedelic mushrooms. Even more risky.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

 

Given it's a children's hospital, presumably the victims were kids. Schools and parents need to be more aware of potential problems and educate the kids. Chances are, as the article hints, the kids were looking for psychedelic mushrooms. Even more risky.

I think poison centres are often operated from children’s hospitals because children are usually most likely to be poisoned by all kinds of means. I do not think it indicates that the victims of mushroom poisoning were necessarily children. Reading the article I get the impression that the victims were adults. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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8 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I think poison centres are often operated from children’s hospitals because children are usually most likely to be poisoned by all kinds of means.

 

That, I didn't know. That said, the only reference I can see to age in the article specificies young people looking for hallucinogenics.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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But everybody knows that you need some amanita virosa to put in your Coq au Nyquill

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"A fool", he said, "would have swallowed it". Samuel Johnson

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59 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

That, I didn't know. That said, the only reference I can see to age in the article specificies young people looking for hallucinogenics.

You are correct that the only specific reference is to young people and hallucinogenic mushrooms. However, I find that most news sources clearly identify victims as children rather than including them as people. Hence my assumption. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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  • 3 weeks later...

I went for a long hike from my porch yesterday headed inland. I was foraging however I only returned with some spearmint and dwarf apples.

Some of our post Fiona clean-up:

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One of the big jobs was clearing this section of our trail:

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The trail was reasonably clear from then on. One still has to be wary as there are trees and limbs still to come down.

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Edited by Senior Sea Kayaker (log)
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