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Duck egg ideas...


billyhill
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I may not be able to find fresh Italian parsley or cilantro whenever I need it but living in the rural areas can offer some advantages. I have a friend that raises chickens and ducks. She can't meet demand for the chicken eggs, but no one wants the duck. She is having hard times financially and I wanted to help out, so now I have duck eggs. Been eating a lot of duck egg quiche lately and adding them to omelets, scrambles, and frittatas. I need some new ideas; I have never been that adventuresome with eggs.

 

Would they be good as deviled eggs?

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I eat duck eggs all the time. Anything you can do with a chicken egg can be done with a duck's to advantage.

 

Additionally, they are great salted or as tea eggs. etc.

 

I posted about duck eggs just yesterday,  here.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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I pick up duck eggs at the farmers market from time to time and use them like chicken eggs, usually saving them for dishes where the flavor will shine as they are more expensive. 

One thing you might try is making salt-cured egg yolks.  It's not going to use up a ton of eggs for you but they have a great umami flavor when grated over pasta or salads and they keep forever in the fridge once they're dried.  Here's a post where I described making some.  It has links to two recipes.  I still haven't tried the smoked one but I did make some where I added some Red Boat salt to the salt mixture and they were great. 

 

Edited to add that there's also a topic on curing egg yolks in miso.  I used the miso method to cure whole chicken eggs and posted about them in that thread and they were great. Downside is that it uses a good bit of miso if you want to do a bunch of eggs. 

Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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I've been told that duck eggs make an especially rich and wonderful cheesecake because of their richer yolks. I'm sorry to say I haven't had the opportunity to try it out. If someone else has, or does, let us know!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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As a kids we ha ducks and I recall we used thyen just like chickenones. I had 2 that laid well and my husband usually took them to work. There was a group of ladies with Southern roots who swore they were the bes for baked goods like cakes. 

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On 11/21/2022 at 9:08 AM, weinoo said:

 

Do you mean an egg cream as sold in certain NYC diners/coffee shops/etc.?

Heard..sounds good.  this is egg yolks beatin,  add touch of vinegar/ salt  and then sous vide  like  149  degrees for 30-35 mins..  makes an awesonme...maybe

Egg sauce would be better

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Its good to have Morels

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  • 2 weeks later...

... an eggsistential dilemma... :P

 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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19 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I have to be careful buying duck eggs in local markets. Here are three. Not all the same. One is a salted egg, one is a century egg and the third a fresh egg. Which is which?

 

IMG_20221202_175947.thumb.jpg.0c1d15b722cd94961502925c38cbb87e.jpg

 

The size difference is striking, but I doubt it's relevant to your question. Since nobody else has hazarded a guess, I'll stick my neck out. From left to right: Fresh, Salted, Century. 

 

Now, what's the answer? Can you tell from looking at the shell?

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

The size difference is striking, but I doubt it's relevant to your question. Since nobody else has hazarded a guess, I'll stick my neck out. From left to right: Fresh, Salted, Century. 

 

Now, what's the answer? Can you tell from looking at the shell?

 

You are correct; but I don't know how. No, there is no way to tell just by looking at the shell. The first two are sea duck eggs which tend to be larger than land ducks, but size isn't a clue, either.

 

The vendors have to keep them strictly segregated or they don't know.

 

answer.jpg.658abf5c18b79b7803cd71d0e43295ee.jpg

answer.jpg

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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