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Culinary Terms that Should be Banned!


liuzhou
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2 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

Trust me - the few interactions I've had with him, in real life over the years, have been less than pleasant.

 

A gavone indeed. And in his deeds, a real piece of work - consider how he escaped all the accusations.

I always wondered how he came out unscathed from the Batali stuff.  He knew.  

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That wasn't chicken

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there was an article on-line today in the NYTimes :

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/25/dining/air-fryer.html

 

""  A year ago, Rebecca Abbott, a food photographer and blogger in Mesa, Ariz., bought her first air fryer to develop recipes for a client’s blog. She started with the usual air-fryer specialties, frozen pizza rolls and tater tots, but it wasn’t long until she realized that her model could make pretty much anything she wanted. Four months later, she was stunned when her homemade cheesecake emerged from the device, baked to perfection in 20 minutes with no cracks or dips. ""

 

etc etc

 

then a bit later in that same article :

 

""  Farrah Jalanbo, a food influencer in Chino Hills, Calif., came up with an elote-inspired recipe for corn ribs that became an air-fryer favorite.  ""

 

I don't know FJ and this has little to do w FJ  but please 

 

Food influencer ?

 

drunk.jpeg.ea3ef6a4e63bc73fa1f99d6a7b02b704.jpeg

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

""  Farrah Jalanbo, a food influencer in Chino Hills, Calif., came up with an elote-inspired recipe for corn ribs that became an air-fryer favorite.  ""

 

I don't know FJ and this has little to do w FJ  but please 

 

I influence food all the time—mainly from wherever it's been prepared into my mouth.

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Great.  Another foolish term.  Foodie always made me roll my eyes, but food influencer?  Seriously?  I'm with rotus.  Knock it off already LOL

 

and, who actually decides who is, and who is not, an influencer? ;) is there a committee?

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4 minutes ago, JeanneCake said:

Great.  Another foolish term.  Foodie always made me roll my eyes, but food influencer?  Seriously?  I'm with rotus.  Knock it off already LOL

 

and, who actually decides who is, and who is not, an influencer? ;) is there a committee?

 

Yes, and it's an influential one.

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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On 3/30/2021 at 9:06 PM, AAQuesada said:

Lolol! How many people actually pronounce 'eGullet' correctly?  

 

If it's wrong i don't want to be right 😉

eGoulet

BDA6855C-458B-4A5E-BE3E-6B584BF72401.jpeg

My dad claims to have worked with Robert Goulet in the early days and said he was known as (phonetically)  Bob Gull-it

 

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57 minutes ago, JeanneCake said:

Great.  Another foolish term.  Foodie always made me roll my eyes, but food influencer?  Seriously?  I'm with rotus.  Knock it off already LOL

 

and, who actually decides who is, and who is not, an influencer? ;) is there a committee?

No it is  likes, hits, followers, subscribers etc. The vast unwashed masses. An artificial world. 

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'Influencer' seems to be a term that's escaped from the marketing corral.  Madison Avenue types started identifying Youtubers with a broad reach and approached them about being spokesbeings because they were in the position to influence people.

 

At that point Influencer=Money.

 

Now everyone (of that ilk) wants to be an influencer. And the use of the term is shameless.

 

[edit]There are now Influencer Awards.  Big, loud, EDM Award Ceremonies....

Edited by IndyRob (log)
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I started reading :

 

https://www.amazon.com/Midnight-Lock-Lincoln-Rhyme-Novel/dp/0525536000/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2SZ9G2X1CYC74&keywords=midnight+lock&qid=1643200390&sprefix=midnight+lock%2Cspecialty-aps%2C426&sr=8-1

 

last evening.    I had it on my iPad for a while, it just got buries w so many other books.

 

these books tend to be favorite.  '' Influencer "  was mentioned.

 

Lincoln Rhyme  scoffs at the notion.

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Quote

influencer

 

(ˈɪnfluːənsə(r))

 

[f. as prec. + -er1.]

 

One who or that which influences.

 

1664 H. More Myst. Iniq. 473 The head and influencer of the whole Church.    

 

1775 F. Burney Early Diary (1889) II. 103 Known as the chief influencer of her conduct.    

 

1826 E. Irving Babylon I. iv. 309 The chief and sovereign influencers of the destinies of men.    a

 

1866 J. Grote Exam. Utilit. Philos. x. (1870) 167 Honour is one of the most powerful influencers of human nature.

 

OED

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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30 minutes ago, Mjx said:

Has anyone mentioned 'bonbon' as a word that needs to go? Apart from being twee, it's applied to so many different things that it means nothing in particular.

 

Agreed.

 

And twee is a fine word.  John MacPhee seemed to get one use (just one) of it in every book

 

I'd add "ooey-gooey" to the list.  I think food network and Marc Summers are behind it.

Edited by gfweb (log)
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1 hour ago, Mjx said:

Has anyone mentioned 'bonbon' as a word that needs to go? Apart from being twee, it's applied to so many different things that it means nothing in particular.

I beg to differ as my mother would have said - when you use the the term 'chocolate' it can mean so many things where I do consider a bonbon to be more specific. However it does dredge up memories of Peggy Bundy swinging a leg and yelling 'bonbon' 'bonbon'!

 

I also agree twee is a fine word!

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Mjx said:

Has anyone mentioned 'bonbon' as a word that needs to go? Apart from being twee, it's applied to so many different things that it means nothing in particular.

 

I have no objection to it. It's been around since the 18th century and developed its figurative meaning in the 19th. If we were to ban all words which have changed meaning or have taken on figurative meanings there would be very little language left. Its meaning is nearly always clear from the context.

 

The origin of 'twee' is also the same. It is a childlike corruption of 'sweet'.

I would also bring back the now rare 'bonbonnière', a small fancy box to hold sweets.

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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23 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

I have no objection to it. It's been around since the 18th century and developed its figurative meaning in the 19th. If we were to ban all words which have changed meaning or have taken on figurative meanings there would be very little language left. Its meaning is nearly always clear from the context.

 

The origin of 'twee' is also the same. It is a childlike corruption of 'sweet'.

I would also bring back the now rare 'bonbonnière', a small fancy box to hold sweets.

 

Bonbonnière still exists in my world. 

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19 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I beg to differ as my mother would have said - when you use the the term 'chocolate' it can mean so many things where I do consider a bonbon to be more specific. However it does dredge up memories of Peggy Bundy swinging a leg and yelling 'bonbon' 'bonbon'!

 

I also agree twee is a fine word!

 

But it's used to mean so many things other than filled chocolates, including many sweets that involve no chocolate, and those ice cream...thingies, if they still exist.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Mjx said:

But it's used to mean so many things other than filled chocolates

 

It always was! It's meaning has never been defined by chocolate. The original definition and still the most common current definition is

 

Quote

A lozenge or other confection made of sugar.

 

Only one of my many dictionaries mentions chocolate and that is just given as an example; not a defining feature.

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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