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lame username

What's the term for this texture, surface effect...?

16 posts in this topic

What is the term for this texture? My mind wants to say "fractured", but that doesn't quite seem right.cheesecake-c.jpgice cream.jpgIMG_0552 (1280x960).jpg


Inventing the Universe

Here in the South, we don't hide crazy. We parade it on the front porch and give it a cocktail.

The devil is in the details but God is in the fat.

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Ok, 'Delamination'

Failure, fracture.

The bottom shot says 'brush me !'


Who cares how time progresses..

Today I am drinking ale.

(Edgar Allen Poe)

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The bottom shot says 'brush me !'

His (Ragdoll - growing out from a shave) fur always looks like that, even when brushed. :blink:

I like "delamination", thanks!


Inventing the Universe

Here in the South, we don't hide crazy. We parade it on the front porch and give it a cocktail.

The devil is in the details but God is in the fat.

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Efflorescent? Efflorescence (which means "to flower out" in French)

dcarch

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Ripples? No, Riffles . That's what I meant ! Like a ruffle, only smaller!

ETA riffles.


Edited by judiu (log)

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I'm gonna throw out 'feathered'...


So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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Many thanks for the responses.


Inventing the Universe

Here in the South, we don't hide crazy. We parade it on the front porch and give it a cocktail.

The devil is in the details but God is in the fat.

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I've heard it referred to as a "random scaling effect" that is, forming scales, thick and thin, on the outer surface as the material is manipulated.

"Ragged" is the term used in pastries.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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None of these seem quite right. There are no layers in ice cream to delaminate, so that can't be it.

An efflorescence is an out-blooming, like a tuft of mold on a cheese, which isn't quite right.

The fractures or whatever they are called come from the serving spoon/knife being cold enough to partialy adhere to the cold ice cream and tear it as it moves through. A hot spoon wouldn't do this, nor would warmish ice cream.

I suggest that we name it after you...its the Lame Username Effect.

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None of these seem quite right. There are no layers in ice cream to delaminate, so that can't be it.

An efflorescence is an out-blooming, like a tuft of mold on a cheese, which isn't quite right.

The fractures or whatever they are called come from the serving spoon/knife being cold enough to partialy adhere to the cold ice cream and tear it as it moves through. A hot spoon wouldn't do this, nor would warmish ice cream.

I suggest that we name it after you...its the Lame Username Effect.

I can't say no. I've always been fascinated with eponymous terms. Bovie, Alyce clamp, Dyson sphere... How fun to have my own that applies to ice cream and cheesecake.


Inventing the Universe

Here in the South, we don't hide crazy. We parade it on the front porch and give it a cocktail.

The devil is in the details but God is in the fat.

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I've heard it referred to as a "random scaling effect" that is, forming scales, thick and thin, on the outer surface as the material is manipulated.

"Ragged" is the term used in pastries.

It occurred to me that I should move this to a pastry thread. If pastry chefs call it "ragged", I am content.


Inventing the Universe

Here in the South, we don't hide crazy. We parade it on the front porch and give it a cocktail.

The devil is in the details but God is in the fat.

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How about "fissured"?


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog

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Oooo, fissured; I like that one too.


Inventing the Universe

Here in the South, we don't hide crazy. We parade it on the front porch and give it a cocktail.

The devil is in the details but God is in the fat.

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Quilted

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk HD

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