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CantCookStillTry

Farmers Markets 2018

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

Lovely haul. Do the tomatoes still have good flavor?

They're not mid-summer tomatoes but quite good - juicy and flavorful.  They're from Beylik Family Farms and grown hydroponically but since they are ripened on the vine and harvested locally, they are way better than what I think of as "hot house" tomatoes.

I always pick mine from the "seconds" bin, which are less expensive, but also more ripe. 

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We have some growers here in Arkansas who are doing high-tunnel greenhouse growing for tomatoes, peppers and lettuces during the winter. They generally only have to heat in January and February. They're growing hydroponically, and the lettuces/greens are indistinguishable from garden grown. The tomatoes, mostly cherry and grape varieties, are quite acceptable.

 


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Today's haul:

IMG_0593.thumb.jpg.63c1385cb6249bffdcb5a80c5521bb9c.jpg

Left to right, more or less.  Flat leaf parsley, fava shoots/leaves, celery, 2 bunches of cilantro with sage and blood oranges above and a leek at the top.  a few small tomatoes and 2 bunches of spinach.

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So jealous.  Our market opens April 20th with mainly greens, radish and leeks or parsnips from last year.

 

What are fava shoots?

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I am so envious.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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2 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

What are fava shoots?

 

They're just the ends and leaves of the fava bean plants. These have a few flowers on them, too.  The leaves taste kind of like a somewhat bean-y spinach.  I have never had them before but they were only $2 for a bunch so I figured I would get them to play around with. 

Joshua McFadden mentioned them in Six Seasons and suggested using them in salads or sautéing them.  I found a few recipes using them to make pesto.  The woman selling them at the market said the stems could be steamed.  Not sure I will do that, but the first options are likely. 

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The shoots would go well with asparagus or artichoke or green peas.  Marcella Hazen has a recipe for artichokes, peas, fava beans and romaine lettuce.  Basically you chop the veg and fry in garlic and olive oil until they are done to your liking.  I am going to make this in the next few days with last year's fava beans from the freezer, frozen commercial peas and some lovely artichokes I bought yesterday.   I will serve it tossed with homemade fettuccine with a little steak on the side.  We rarely get good artichokes in the store so when I saw these nice firm ones I couldn't resist.

 

Speaking of spring, I can't wait for our asparagus to come...another three to four weeks.  This is the only time in the year that I buy asparagus.  I usually buy several pounds over the few weeks it is available and make asparagus soup for later.  And, yes, we have it everyday in some form or another.

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I'm the same way. We should start with asparagus in the next week or so. Need to contact my local farmers.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Here are a few more photos of my fava purchase.  @ProfessionalHobbit/@SobaAddict70 mentioned them a few times in the past but I didn't find much other discussion. 

The bunch:

IMG_0598.thumb.jpg.9cd416bd381e232cf7e3ab31e127fa32.jpg

 

Hollow stems:

IMG_0599.thumb.jpg.4c2c6addf0fa9ddfd9072892481e110c.jpg

As I mentioned, the woman selling them said these could be steamed and eaten.  

 

Out of focus flowers.  These are edible.  They taste sort of nutty.

IMG_0601.thumb.jpg.3e2a4cd6b84111fe6ec39127bae3b5c8.jpg

 

The leaves, washed and ready to go:

IMG_0604.thumb.jpg.d1d2ed9f27739a04723aa8d5388b585e.jpg

I got about 5 oz of leaves from that bunch.  I'm reserving some for a salad and sautéing the rest.

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1 hour ago, Okanagancook said:

 

Speaking of spring, I can't wait for our asparagus to come...another three to four weeks.  This is the only time in the year that I buy asparagus.  I usually buy several pounds over the few weeks it is available and make asparagus soup for later.  And, yes, we have it everyday in some form or another.

 

It is early for both asparagus and artichoke here. Of course with the imports from south of the border we have asparagus year round but I just can not do it. I get a bit envious when I see some of the varieties of artichokes in other places. Here it  is "bigger/better".  Sometimes I indulge in the frozen hearts from Trader Joes! 

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Posted (edited)

Yesterday we came across this unmanned stall with a cash box.  There were three sizes of maple syrup for sale, all being sold on the honor system.  A little later I stopped at my egg farm place where I bought 4 dozen free range eggs, also on the honor system.  Usually the chickens are running around outside (no boundaries) but yesterday they were inside.  Not enough to,peck away at yet, I guess.

20190421_142447.jpg


Edited by ElsieD (log)
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I love this.  We have the same thing around here with eggs, peaches, apricots and cherries.

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4 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

I love this.  We have the same thing around here with eggs, peaches, apricots and cherries.

 

Sadly, peaches, apricots and cherries don't grow around here.

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Well, you will just have to move out here to paradise!

Does the Niagara region produce enough fruit to supply southern Ontario....as a kid growing up in Toronto, I do remember Niagara fruit and also travelling there looking at the rows and rows of fruit trees whiz by the car window.

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13 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Well, you will just have to move out here to paradise!

Does the Niagara region produce enough fruit to supply southern Ontario....as a kid growing up in Toronto, I do remember Niagara fruit and also travelling there looking at the rows and rows of fruit trees whiz by the car window.

 

They produce a lot of fruit.  There is one farmer from Niagara who comes to the Ottawa market in the fall with peaches, grapes, cherries, etc.  I grew up in the Woodstock area and my mother did a lot of canning so every year we would do the Niagara tour and get whatever fruit she wanted for that purpose.

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Got to market today. I love my farmers and appreciate them immensely. Today's haul. Thinking stuffing the eggplant and just broiling zuke slices. Green beans w/ pasta. Tomatoes which are still nicely sweet are for snacking.  Avocado (I like the little guys - small pit, lots of flesh) with some type of spread on my no-knead bread. So inspiring.  

fm.JPG

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5 minutes ago, heidih said:

Got to market today. I love my farmers and appreciate them immensely. Today's haul. Thinking stuffing the eggplant and just broiling zuke slices. Green beans w/ pasta. Tomatoes which are still nicely sweet are for snacking.  Avocado (I like the little guys - small pit, lots of flesh) with some type of spread on my no-knead bread. So inspiring.  

 

 

What are you going to stuff the eggplant with?

 

I picked up 2 mid-size ones from my local organic farmer and made a riff on a dish I saw on 'Somebody's gotta feed Phil' - middle eastern roasted eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, onion, chili - blended up and cooked down further.

 

But I do like hearing what others do with their eggplants as well!  Such a versatile veg!

 

 

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22 minutes ago, TicTac said:

 

But I do like hearing what others do with their eggplants as well!  Such a versatile veg!

 

 

I bought two Italian eggplants the other day intended for a braise.  Waiting to get inspired.

 

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I tried eggplant a couple of times and was totally turned off by both the texture and taste.  If I remember correctly, I baked it. I have since read that smaller varieties aren't as bitter.  Is this true?

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3 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

I tried eggplant a couple of times and was totally turned off by both the texture and taste.  If I remember correctly, I baked it. I have since read that smaller varieties aren't as bitter.  Is this true?

 

I like bittr so am a poor judge! Yes smaller esp longer Japanese/Chinese ones (sorta zucchini shaped) are hardly bitter. 

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Agree, the lighter colored purple skin variety is better for those who don’t care for the bitterness. The flesh is sweeter and there are no nasty big seeds. When braised, it becomes quite soft and I like to cut it in to chunks and simmer in thai curries. The skin is thin and becomes quite soft.


"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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I found a recipe years ago somewhere that I still love (may have been Food52). Just mix equal portions honey and miso; cut eggplant into 1 1/2-inch cubes, salt and drain for 30 minutes or so, then toss in the honey-miso mixture and roast; best of my recollection, 400 for 20-25 minutes. 

 

I also like to just roast big thick slices, then dip in egg wash and bread in a panko-Parmesan mixture, fry in about 1/4 inch of oil, and then cover with marinara and bake briefly.

 

I always peel my big globe eggplants; don't peel the long, slender lighter purple ones.

 

I have also had, somewhere, a different sort of eggplant parmesan, where the eggplant was sliced thin, maybe 1/8 inch, and layered (uncooked?) with lots of cheese and meat sauce, then baked. That's good, too.

 

And there's an eggplant casserole featuring little more than eggplant, eggs, cheese and cracker crumbs that my favorite meat-and-three in Memphis serves. Which I've tried to make (with THEIR recipe, in THEIR recipe book) and can't get close to. So I keep going there, which is likely their entire plan.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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