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IowaDee

Rancho Gordo Featured in Sunset Magazine Article

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The February issue of Sunset Magazine has a great article about the beans of Mexico.  And guess who is featured.....our own Steve Sando.  Nice write up and lots and lots of recipes.  I have been a Sunset subscriber for more than 25 years and I finally :"know" someone in it.  Cool Beans as they say.

 

I hope someone with more skills than I have can post a link. 

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Thanks. I just got my copy. It's pretty cool! I am officially a media whore, and I mean that in the good way! 

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Fortunately my library offers Sunset online.  I'm sitting here with my mai tai savoring Steve's article on my iPad, which if must say so, looks even more glorious than the printed magazine.  I'd been wanting beans all day.  Tomorrow I may put beans on to soak before I leave for work.  I can't handle unsoaked beans on a work day unless I use the pressure cooker.

 

Congratulations, Steve, on your recent publicity.  Now I wish I'd ordered Moro!

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At work today I showed the print edition of the Sunset article to a few folks.  When I mentioned Rancho Gordo, one friend looking at the pictures said:  "I've heard of them."

 

Sadly the beauty of the print edition photographs does not compare to how stunningly pretty they are on my iPad.

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I was making beans this afternoon when my wife called me into the other room and said "hey, isn't this your bean guy?" And sure enough, "my bean guy" was there in Sunset, right as I was making his Ayocote Amarillos. Nice article.

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 Congratulations, Steve. Some of your black turtle beans will be finding their way to my house next week thanks to Kerry Beal and her visit to San Francisco.   I am just learning to enjoy beans and I credit yours with getting me over my dislike of them.  

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Some vaquero beans will make their appearance in my Instant Pot as a major ingredient in vegetarian chili with butternut squash later this week. New convert to RG, and I'm sold. Will never buy another kind of bean.

 

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At this very moment I'm soaking some Midnight Black beans (for just a few hours; Steve says they need "little, if any, soaking") which eventually will be combined with onions, carrots, celery, and local Tuscan kale, probably served over rice, for a simple Sunday night dinner.

 

Quote

I hope someone with more skills than I have can post a link

 

I looked, but the article is nowhere to be found. A site-specific Google search (Sando site:sunset.com) turned up only a brief mention in an April, 2015, article about the home-canning of beans.

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I was able to pick  up a copy of this issue in the airport last week and want to add my congrats on a great article.

Sunset has sort of locked down their digital so I wasn't able to find it online either but the recipes that accompany the article as well as some additional bean recipes are available  here or type in sunset.com/beans

 

There are some good ones that I plan to try.

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To expand a bit on what I wrote above, our library offers Sunset (and many other magazines) online via a service called Flipster.  (Though I had a hard time paging past a gorgeous chocolate advertisement to make it to the beans.)  And of course we have the hardcopy.

 

Check with your local library!  The photographs are beautiful.  Even the one of Steve.

 

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@blue_dolphin Thanks for the link. I am not a customer of RG since I grow and dry several kinds of beans myself,enough for the two of us, however I'm going to have to try several of those recipes. 

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