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maggiethecat

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 5)

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Darienne   

Thank you FrogPrincess for posting. Reminds me to post.

I've bought one cookbook since coming to Utah this year and paid an Amazon price: Muy Bueno (the jury is still out about how useful it will be) and from second hand stores: 7 books. (Also 5 Bon Appetit cookbooks for a friend who is collecting them.) It's hard to resist a good cookbook at $.50 or less.

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weinoo   

I might've responded to this before, but I have a fair amount of books. So many, in fact, that a bunch are in storage - which I think is silly.

Anyway, yesterday, a close family member who is in the "food biz" gifted me with a few of the books she happened to receive this year:

2012_12 Cookbooks.JPG

I'm very excited about at least 3 of them:

Thai Street Food (which is huge)

Vietnamese Home Cooking

My Pizza

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Mjx   

Thanks to some amazon gift certificates from my sister, I recently added Francisco Migoya's Elements of Dessert and Judith Benn Hurley's The Good Herb to my collection (I'm not sure whether 'added' is correct for the latter, since I owned a copy that mysteriously vanished at my sister's place, where it may still be lurking).

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LT Wong   

I added the following -

SPQR

Gu Chocolate Cookbook

Andy Bates' Modern twists on classic dishes

Italian Cuisine Signature Dishes

The Hakka Cookbook

I gave away my copy of My Pizza (which is really good) to my friend who is crazy about pizza. So, I have to add it back at some point in time.


Edited by LT Wong (log)

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Raamo   

I have a small bookshelf from Ikea, it's full height but only half width. My wife won't let me buy any more cookbooks then what fit on the shelves. I recently got rid of 15+ books, 1/2 were ATK books replaced by the 10 year compalation.

Even then I've still got a very full self, easily 40 books. Still not sure wher MC is going to go once I get that. :)

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pufin3   

About a hundred cook books and another fifty 'foodie' books like 'Belly Of Paris' and the Bemelman books, Waverly etc.

I did a major 'purge' a few years ago and regret doing so every day.


Edited by pufin3 (log)

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jjahorn   

Someone mentioned the America's Test Kitchen Compilation.

I don't know ATK - and just looked it up. The individual yearbooks seem to have recipes and tips on preparation as well as tools and things. Using 'Look Inside' on Amazon, the compilation looks like it is just recipes - is that right? I like how the yearbooks show you photos with steps of doing certain activities.

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Someone mentioned the America's Test Kitchen Compilation.

I don't know ATK - and just looked it up. The individual yearbooks seem to have recipes and tips on preparation as well as tools and things. Using 'Look Inside' on Amazon, the compilation looks like it is just recipes - is that right? I like how the yearbooks show you photos with steps of doing certain activities.

There are very few photos in most of ATK's books. However, the recipes are excellent. They have their 'menu' books and the books in looseleaf and ring binders which have the most pictures in any of their books. IMO, their 'best' series is truly their best. I have bought copies for myself and my daughters.

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vogelap   

I am planning to move some books around... That might give me a good opportunity to count my cookbooks because, well, I'd like to know! I know it's over 100 (like I posted before), but just HOW MUCH over, I don't know.

Well, I recently counted. My food-related book collection numbers 360.

My name is Drew, and I'm a cookbook-aholic.

Latest check is over 500 cookbooks... Yikes. I have seriously slowed down in purchasing/accepting cookbooks (I really have!).

Most recent acquisitions: Tyler Florence's FRESH and Underly's The Art of Beef Cutting.

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fvandrog   

I am planning to move some books around... That might give me a good opportunity to count my cookbooks because, well, I'd like to know! I know it's over 100 (like I posted before), but just HOW MUCH over, I don't know.

Well, I recently counted. My food-related book collection numbers 360.

My name is Drew, and I'm a cookbook-aholic.

Latest check is over 500 cookbooks... Yikes. I have seriously slowed down in purchasing/accepting cookbooks (I really have!).

Most recent acquisitions: Tyler Florence's FRESH and Underly's The Art of Beef Cutting.

This is a great thread -- I suddenly feel so much better, only owning about a hundred cooking books. I have recently begun buying some of them electronically since it takes at least less space -- but in general I prefer the paper versions, especially when they have nice photos and how-to's.

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Darienne   

Recently I gave to our local library's book sale 15 cookbooks which I didn't need. Don't be alarmed...none of you would have wanted them either. :smile:

Still I have slowed W-A-A-Y down in buying cookbooks. There's so much online now that I can't even make the recipes which I download and print.

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jjahorn   

Darienne has a good point about too much information out there.

Does anyone have a good organization tips or a program for tracking web-site recipes?

I don't want to print everything that looks good...

I bookmark interesting ones. When I try them I move good ones to a folder liked, and delete the others, the the lists can get quite long.

And of course I lost them all once because I didn't back-up my computer and had a major crash.

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Ttogull   

Does anyone have a good organization tips or a program for tracking web-site recipes?

I don't want to print everything that looks good...

I bookmark interesting ones. When I try them I move good ones to a folder liked, and delete the others, the the lists can get quite long.

And of course I lost them all once because I didn't back-up my computer and had a major crash.

I use Evernote for the ones I want to keep track of but don't really want to print. It comes with a browser add-on, and you just click the little button and it saves an actual copy of the page somewhere in the clouds. It's free but capped per month - I haven't yet hit the caps. You can pay to loosen the caps. It also has the benefit that it is the same on all your devices, so if you clipped on your computer and later decide at the grocery store that you want to make the recipe, you can access it with your smartphone.

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Ttogull   

Does anyone have a good organization tips or a program for tracking web-site recipes?

I don't want to print everything that looks good...

I bookmark interesting ones. When I try them I move good ones to a folder liked, and delete the others, the the lists can get quite long.

And of course I lost them all once because I didn't back-up my computer and had a major crash.

I use Evernote for the ones I want to keep track of but don't really want to print. It comes with a browser add-on, and you just click the little button and it saves an actual copy of the page somewhere in the clouds. It's free but capped per month - I haven't yet hit the caps. You can pay to loosen the caps. It also has the benefit that it is the same on all your devices, so if you clipped on your computer and later decide at the grocery store that you want to make the recipe, you can access it with your smartphone.

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Braam Kruger ( http://blogs.timeslive.co.za/pendock/2008/06/08/braam-kruger-fondly-remembered/) had the most cookbooks I ever saw. Laid along the floor about 40 ft. I have less than two and a half thousand. and I'm finding a big gap.

We have all these books from restaurant chefs. Somehow they get toned down for us. The assumption is we don't have professional cooking tools. Is it the Editor or the Chef, who is assuming?

Many Italian homes have meat slicers. Some hunters have vacuum pack machines. In places where the electricity is unreliable people have Anvil gas stoves. At home!

But, friends, there persists this image of us; we live in little poky apartmants with a weak hotplate and a low power Microwave. Who makes this assumption that I don't have a Wok? That I don't have a 90litre (95Quart US) pot? That I am not interested in cooking for 80 of my daughter's friends at her 21st party?

who is keeping secrets?

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I have around 400, give or take a few, plus wooden wine crates full of old issues of 'Gourmet' from decades gone by. One of my favorite recent re-acquisitions is the hard-bound 50th anniversary edition of the "I Hate to Cook Book," which my mother received for Xmas in the early sixties, and of which I had a paperback copy that served me well in college and beyond. If I had a nickel for every time I've eaten "Pedro's Special" in my lifetime - well, let's just say I'd have an awfully big bag of nickels. Funny, sharply-observed, and a time capsule to remind people that women DID in fact work back in the 60's - Peg Bracken was a San Francisco ad exec. Highly recommended on multiple levels.

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Silkhat   

I was embarrassed to admit I have about 200 cookbooks but after reading this thread I guess I am just a minnow.

I bought 2 new ones this past week and they contain many many wonderful recipes but are also works of arts with such great quality of printing

Curry Kitchen / Jacki Passmore / ISBN 9780670074488 / 313 pp / 10 in x 9.25 in

660 Curries /Raghavan Iyer / ISBN 9780761137870 / 809 pp / 9 in x 8 in

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Alex   

Does anyone have a good organization tips or a program for tracking web-site recipes?

I don't want to print everything that looks good...

I bookmark interesting ones. When I try them I move good ones to a folder liked, and delete the others, the the lists can get quite long.

And of course I lost them all once because I didn't back-up my computer and had a major crash.

I use Evernote for the ones I want to keep track of but don't really want to print. It comes with a browser add-on, and you just click the little button and it saves an actual copy of the page somewhere in the clouds. It's free but capped per month - I haven't yet hit the caps. You can pay to loosen the caps. It also has the benefit that it is the same on all your devices, so if you clipped on your computer and later decide at the grocery store that you want to make the recipe, you can access it with your smartphone.

Even with Evernote, I hope you've starting doing regular back-ups, which is a :cool: thing to do.

Hey, this topic might make an interesting separate thread. Moderators...?

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kayb   

I think I have added possibl 6 since my last post....

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Denadar   

I only have about 350 but I have just bought another two. Think I'll have to buy another bookcase! (Or a bigger house)

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