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dcarch

Dinner! 2013 (Part 2)

597 posts in this topic

dcarch, happy Bangladesh New Year. What a feast! The shrimps make me mouth watering. I like Indian spicy food. Would you mind recommending some Indian cookbooks which are authentic but not too hard for me? I'm quite a new cooker.

Keith, I come from Jiangsu. Guangdong is definitely food heaven. No wonder you are such a good cook! By the way,I love love love dim sum!!!

today's dinner is the same as lunch, sweet braised pork hock. It was marinaded in soy sauce. After brushing maltose, it was fried and braised in ginger, shallots, rock sugar, mirin, soy sauce, water for 3 hours. Served with sauteed boy chok.

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My baby chinchilla got fungus. Hope she will recover as soon as possible.


Life is beautiful.

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Sole braised with clams, pommes boulangére with lemon thyme

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mm84321, you've transfigured a monstrosity there. It looks almost too beautiful to eat...

Could you tell me what you have lying underneath your fish?

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dcarch, happy Bangladesh New Year. What a feast! The shrimps make me mouth watering. I like Indian spicy food. Would you mind recommending some Indian cookbooks which are authentic but not too hard for me? I'm quite a new cooker.

Keith, I come from Jiangsu. Guangdong is definitely food heaven. No wonder you are such a good cook! By the way,I love love love dim sum!!!

today's dinner is the same as lunch, sweet braised pork hock. It was marinaded in soy sauce. After brushing maltose, it was fried and braised in ginger, shallots, rock sugar, mirin, soy sauce, water for 3 hours. Served with sauteed boy chok.

attachicon.gifeg.jpg

My baby chinchilla got fungus. Hope she will recover as soon as possible.

I'm enjoying your posts very much, TinaYuan; thanks for sharing what is a novel cuisine to me.

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mm84321, you've transfigured a monstrosity there. It looks almost too beautiful to eat...

Could you tell me what you have lying underneath your fish?

Thanks. It is a bed of caramelized spring onion.

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Tough posts to follow. Forget about penis envy, I have food porn envy. Tonight's feeble attempt - a sous vide, deep fried whole chicken with mango salsa. Based on a Bryan Voltaggio recipe.

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TynaYuan that's an wonderful dinner, it looks yummy!


Edited by rod rock (log)

"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

Franchise Takeaway

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will let it sit until Sunday.


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Edited by basquecook (log)

“I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted" JK

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dcarch, happy Bangladesh New Year. What a feast! The shrimps make me mouth watering. I like Indian spicy food. Would you mind recommending some Indian cookbooks which are authentic but not too hard for me? I'm quite a new cooker.

Keith, I come from Jiangsu. Guangdong is definitely food heaven. No wonder you are such a good cook! By the way,I love love love dim sum!!!

today's dinner is the same as lunch, sweet braised pork hock. It was marinaded in soy sauce. After brushing maltose, it was fried and braised in ginger, shallots, rock sugar, mirin, soy sauce, water for 3 hours. Served with sauteed boy chok.

attachicon.gifeg.jpg

My baby chinchilla got fungus. Hope she will recover as soon as possible.

I'm enjoying your posts very much, TinaYuan; thanks for sharing what is a novel cuisine to me.

Thanks! Most I made are Chinese. I'm so happy you like it~


Life is beautiful.

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TynaYuan that's an wonderful dinner, it looks yummy!

Thanks, rod rock :biggrin:


Life is beautiful.

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This is a John Dory. Legend has it that St. Peter caught this fish. Knowing that it was mostly head and had little meat, he threw it back, leaving his thumbprint on the side of the fish. Little did he know that John Dory has firm, sweet flesh and a subtle flavour. This carnivorous fish uses its slim profile to sneak up to prey, then captures it using its extensible jaws.

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These are sea bananas, a type of coastal succulent. The leaves are tender, slightly salty and has a faint iodine flavour (nowhere near as strong as samphire).

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Panfried John Dory with a beurre noisette with boiled lemon and capers, with fingerling lime, sea bananas, Chanterey carrots, and baby Nicola.


There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

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Wow amazing fish dishes on this page!! Great job mm84321 and Keith_W.

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MikeHartnett – Thank you! Carrot and bean soup with avocado looks/sounds fantastic.

dcarch – Thank you, too! Your pictures as always look fantastic, I would particularly like to try the shrimp. How were the forsythia blossoms?

Beautiful fish all around! Madhur Jaffrey meal tonight

Scallops in aromatic tomato-cream sauce – Stir-fried with mustard seed, garlic, and cilantro, and then simmered with a sauce of tomato paste, garam masala, cumin, cayenne, chiles, lemon juice, and heavy cream. A little went a long way.

Stir-fried cabbage with fennel seeds – Onions, cumin and sesame seeds, cayenne, and lemon juice, stir-fried in ghee. I like cabbage, and this is probably my favorite way to prepare it.

Turmeric rice – Basmati rice pilaf-style with bay leaf, cloves, cinnamon stick, green cardamom, garlic, and cilantro.

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Bruce - in my comfort zone as usual- was it fennel versus sesame seeds or in addition to? I have both and am thinking this will be a great use of the cabbage in my fridge.

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Last night, a few roasted branzinos. propped them up on lemons, did the necessary slicing, to ensure the filet falls away from the body after roasting. added tarragon and garlic. roasted at 450.. served over a quick dal. toasted mustard seeds, added butter, garlic, cumin, turmeric, tossed into the boiling yellow lentil, added bay and hot pepper.



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to start i made a green curry: coconut milk, green curry, lime juice, hot peppers, fish sauce, brown sugar. threw in some cherry tomatoes, then roasted sausage, added three live blue crab that were just cut in half, then potato, then carrots, cauliflower, then mussels and at the last moment sliced squid.



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Edited by basquecook (log)

“I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted" JK

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In answer to Keith's earlier post, w/ his 3 day/62c ribs (any reason why you opted for this time/temp combo?) I did some sv/smoking of my own with some beef short ribs. 58c/48 hours. A dry rub comprised of salt, pepper, a bit of sugar, chipotle, garlic, onion and powdered mustard (the 'Big Bad Beef Rub' from AmazingRibs). Smoked for just shy of 2 hours. I was happy with them altho' next time I think I'd cut the chilli powder altogether and use more pepper and maybe add some herbal element. Rosemary, perhaps.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Bruce - in my comfort zone as usual- was it fennel versus sesame seeds or in addition to? I have both and am thinking this will be a great use of the cabbage in my fridge.

Thanks, Heidi - fennel and sesame seeds. The recipe is all over the web - google "stir-fried green cabbage with fennel seeds".

. . . to start i made a green curry: coconut milk, green curry, lime juice, hot peppers, fish sauce, brown sugar. threw in some cherry tomatoes, then roasted sausage, added three live blue crab that were just cut in half, then potato, then carrots, cauliflower, then mussels and at the last moment sliced squid.

Speaking of "in my comfort zone" . . . and the fish looks great, too.

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Funny you made that, Chris. Guess what I had for dinner tonight!

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Argentinian style Asado with chimichurri, potatoes, and Chanterey carrots. This time I SV'ed the beef short ribs for 48 hours at 62C, then chilled it in the fridge. Why 62C for 72 hours for the previous effort? Because MC&H said so! For tonight, I fired up my charcoal grille until it was an inferno, then cooked the ribs directly from the fridge. They developed a nice char but remained medium well done. The chimichurri had a nice garlic punch. I used coriander instead of parsley - it went really well with the red meat.

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Breakfast was bacon and scrambled eggs, with mushrooms and a tomato compote. For a change, I baked the bacon in an oven instead of panfrying it. This meant that I didn't monitor it quite as closely as I should have, which meant that we had crispy bacon for breakfast. Some might like crispy bacon, but I definitely prefer mine a little moist! The photograph also flatters the scrambled eggs, which by this time had curdled and were weeping fluid.

So yeah, breakfast was a disaster. But the photograph still looks pretty, so i'm posting it!


There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

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Bruce – the chicken thighs sound wonderful and the Napa cabbage stir fry looks really good.

dcarch – Ha! That is something I’d love to see – ME giving mm cooking lessons! That dish looked so good that I had to Google it. Do you know that when one Googles “Daab Chingri Macher Malaikari”, your gardenweb post and pictures are the first ones that come up? Probably too spicy for sissy me, but it sounds so good!

Steve – I promise that, if I ever make it to Australia, I will gladly make you a coconut cake. Better yet, come to the US and I’ll make you anything you want. (One of those gorgeous glass pieces would make an excellent hostess gift! :raz: )

mm – what beautiful sole and what a delicious and lovely treatment!

basquecook – I cannot wait!!!

From a few days ago - beef stir fry and plain old ramen soup:

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The stir fry looked good, but was a bit dull. I used some spice mix envelope that I found at our favorite Asian grocery, but it needed some punching up.

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Kim, your food looks very nice - but I must say that bean sprouts are amongst the least favorite things I would include in a so-called "stir-fry". They always tend to mess up any stir-fry and tend to "endow' a dish with not-necessarily-correct "Chinese" bona fides.

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Great dinners everyone!

TinaYuan - welcome to eG! Which part of China are you from? My family is from Guangdong ... but I spent most of my life in Australia :)

dcarch - Great fanciful plating as always. I get what you are suggesting for my photography and I tried to elevate my glass plate in my second photo. Unfortunately I do not have a point source light as you recommend. I see that my post is the next one after yours ... i'll bet everyone looks at your food and not at mine :)

Steve Irby - If the second pizza is a Margherita, I am all over it. I believe in minimalism on pizzas, and there isn't anything simpler than tomato sauce, good mozarella, and basil on a pizza. Nowhere to hide!

Kim Shook - I love that coconut cake. If you ever come to Australia, could you make that for me? :)

mm84321 - times must be hard! I haven't seen you use truffles for a few weeks now! Stunning looking food as always.

Anyway, two dinners to post tonight. First up:

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BBQ ribs. Beef ribs sous-vide at 62C for 3 days with a rub (minus the salt). Pork ribs sous-vide for 2 days. Both then smoked for 2 hours over hickory.

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Argentinian inspired rockling - panfried rockling with chimichurri, roasted baby capsicum, potato rosti, and broccollini. The messy plating is what happens when you buy a delicious wine to go with dinner, and can't help but take a few swigs of the wine when still cooking dinner. So sorry, it should look nicer but by this time I was drunk and hungry and couldn't really be bothered with plating or photography! (dcarch - plate was elevated to try to get more of a dramatic shadow).

I'm curious why you would feel that the plating is so important, whether you are drunk or not, over how the food tastes.

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Bruce – the chicken thighs sound wonderful and the Napa cabbage stir fry looks really good.

Thanks!

Kim, your food looks very nice - but I must say that bean sprouts are amongst the least favorite things I would include in a so-called "stir-fry". They always tend to mess up any stir-fry and tend to "endow' a dish with not-necessarily-correct "Chinese" bona fides.

Interesting - one of my favorite quick meals is bean sprout pork. Thai rather than Chinese, but a stir-fry nonetheless.

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Kim, your food looks very nice - but I must say that bean sprouts are amongst the least favorite things I would include in a so-called "stir-fry". They always tend to mess up any stir-fry and tend to "endow' a dish with not-necessarily-correct "Chinese" bona fides.

Interesting - one of my favorite quick meals is bean sprout pork. Thai rather than Chinese, but a stir-fry nonetheless.

It's the water they generate whilst being stir-fried. I like a dish of bean sprouts, ginger and scallions - sort-of stir-fried - but the water generated in that particular case is part of the dish.

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