Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Chris Hennes

"Modernist Cuisine at Home" by Myhrvold and Bilet

Recommended Posts

Modernist Cuisine was released just over a year ago to much acclaim (we're cooking with it in this topic), but there was an immediate clamor for a more home-cook-friendly volume: as nathanm mentioned here, that clamor is being answered in October 2012 with the forthcoming Modernist Cuisine at Home (eG-friendly amazon.com page).

From nathanm's post on the book:

MCAH is basically all new material. A few of the most popular recipes from MC are carried over, like mac and cheese, but even these have been re-done to be easier to make in a home kitchen.

If you already have MC, then we think of this as being like volume 6 - i.e. a volume covering home cuisine. There is very little duplication of topics between MC and MCAH - about the only ones I can think of are some coverage of sous vide technique, and some basic recipes like stocks, but even there the MCAH versions are different and adapted for the home.

I've been doing a lot of cooking from the original Modernist Cuisine set and it has resulted in some of the very best food I've ever produced, and in some cases the best I've ever eaten: so of course another volume was a no-brainer for me. It's still not cheap, but I'm pretty stoked about it. Eater has an interview with Myhrvold here with some more details. Who's in?

Edited 6/27 to add: book homepage and table of contents.


Edited by Chris Hennes (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is definitely on my list. The original is a great resource, I expect the home addition to be as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just starting to do some of the recipes from MC now but over the last months or so I have used/applyd stuff from it. I am looking forward to this next "volume". Probably looking at collecting everything that comes out of that organisation/lab

tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as there's a good amount of original content, I'm all in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how many of the recipes will be of the "workable on a weeknight" variety (a la the mac and cheese) and how many will be more extensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any idea how big it is. This will be a lot easy to convince people to buy than the full version.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Physically? No. The amazon page says 456 pages: at $140 retail I'd have to guess it's similar in size to a single volume of the original.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any idea how big it is. This will be a lot easy to convince people to buy than the full version.

450 pages. Looks like the same footprint as the original.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Count me in, enjoyed MC very much but it's a hard sell.

I've been trying to convince other people to buy MC, but there are a few hurdles I hope MCAH will solve those:

- price

- size

- Title of the book. For most people the title is misleading. They think is purely a molecular cooking book(s). So they conclude it's a heafty price for something they will not use.

It's only when they come to my home and have a look into my MC books that they realise there so much more to it than just molecular cooking. And that's when price and size becomes less of a problem.

But when comes MCP (pastery) ? Tommorow? :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have the original (yet) but I will get MCaH when it comes out. The price is a bit easier to swallow and it would be a nice place to start and see if the big brother is something I want to invest in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But when comes MCP (pastery) ? Tommorow? :wink:

Myhrvold has mentioned that they are at least considering it: I'd pre-order that sucker in a heartbeat. It better have a chapter on sourdough!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in too! Does anyone know yet what will be covered in this book?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From that Eater article I gather that there are chapters on:

  • custards and pies
  • chicken wings
  • mac and cheese
  • pizza

Presumably there are more, but that's a pretty good set of home-cooking topics. I'm sensing a Modernist superbowl party next year...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just had a look at the Cooks Forum over at the Modernist Cuisine website, and it looks like only 79 recipes have been commented on. Out of the 1500+ in the books, this is not many at all suggesting that most of the recipes in the books are not attempted, even by those keen enough to sign up for the website (which demonstrates a certain level of enthusiasm in itself...)

The recipe with the most comments by far is the caramelised carrot soup- this recipe is simple, carrots are cheap, the only piece of equipment needed is a pressure cooker, and it tastes delicious. The comments on the forum about the soup are overwhelmingly positive.

If there are more recipes in MC@home that are as accessible as that one, and that tick the same simple, cheap & tasty boxes, then the book is sure to be a hit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The real purpose of MC isn't the recipes, but the techniques. I use what I've learned from Modernist virtually every time I cook. That said, I've attempted a number of recipes from the series and have not documented all the work which means I haven't posted about my experiences with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The real purpose of MC isn't the recipes, but the techniques. I use what I've learned from Modernist virtually every time I cook. That said, I've attempted a number of recipes from the series and have not documented all the work which means I haven't posted about my experiences with them.

+1. My sentiments exactly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh I also agree- I often pick up the volumes and re-read chapters. I've attempted less than 10 recipes in the whole series, yet I read and re-read it more than any other "cookbook" I've ever owned. Volume 1, which doesn't contain any recipes at all, has possibly been the most influential for me with the way it covers hygiene.

There is no doubt that the original 5 volumes have been a huge success - I think they've sold more than 10x the number they thought they would, based on their initial print run of 5000 vs current sales figures close to 50,000. So I would hate to be mis-interpreted as suggesting the books are not successful because not everyone is attempting every recipe.

My point was that the caramelised carrot soup recipe (and the mac & cheese recipe) show a lot of demand and interest in recipes that are more accessible. I can't wait :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the Modernist Cuisine website they have a preview of the book with an index that lists all of the recipes. Now I am really excited.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the Modernist Cuisine website they have a preview of the book with an index that lists all of the recipes. Now I am really excited.

link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice: here's the main table of contents they list there—

Chapter 1: Countertop Tools

Chapter 2: Conventional Cooking Gear

Chapter 3: Cooking Sous Vide

Chapter 4: Ingredients

Chapter 5: Basics

Chapter 6: Breakfast Eggs

Chapter 7: Salads and Cold Soups

Chapter 8: Pressure-Cooked Vegetable Soups

Chapter 9: Steak

Chapter 10: Cheeseburger

Chapter 11: Carnitas

Chapter 12: Braised Short Ribs

Chapter 13: Roast Chicken

Chapter 14: Chicken Wings

Chapter 15: Chicken Noodle Soup

Chapter 16: Salmon

Chapter 17: Shellfish

Chapter 18: Pizza

Chapter 19: Mac and Cheese

Chapter 20: Risotto and Paella

Chapter 21: Cornmeal

Chapter 22: Dishes for the Microwave

Chapter 23: Custards and Pies

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By quiet1
      We have a local Italian bakery my mom loves, but they are very expensive and hard for her to get to. She also really likes cookbooks (she reads them even if she never cooks from them  ) so I was thinking for her birthday I could get her a cookbook that has similar cookies and cakes, and offer to make a few things for her on request also.
       
      I'll obviously look myself, but eGullet is always well informed about the quality of cookbooks so I wanted to know if anyone has any recommendations. The thing about the Italian bakery is that the stuff they make seems to me to be not as sweet as classic American recipes, and often have more complex flavors and also are usually on the light end for whatever the item is. (Like even something that's intended to be dense doesn't have a very heavy sensation in the mouth.)
    • By Dave the Cook
      Modernist Bread is out now, but maybe you haven't taken the plunge. Here's your chance to win your own copy, courtesy of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Cooking Lab has provided us with a couple of other prizes that will go to a second and third winner: second place will win an autographed poster and calendar, and third place will receive an autographed poster. They are also providing an autographed bookplate for the first place winner's copy of Modernist Bread. The rules are simple: we are going to post recipes from the book that the team at The Cooking Lab has graciously provided for this purpose. To enter into the contest, you need to bake one or more of these recipes and post about them in the official contest topics by the end of November 2017. Winners will be drawn at random from those posting pictures and descriptions of their completed loaves. Complete rules and other details can be found here.
       
      For part two, we're featuring another cornerstone recipe from the book: Direct Country-Style Bread. The only leavener here is instant yeast, so production time is considerably shortened. The relative lack of flavor compared to long-proofed doughs is offset by the use of whole grains. Courtesy of The Cooking Lab, here's that recipe (extracted from the book and reformatted for purposes of this contest):
       




    • By ross
      Thanksgiving is around the corner, and I think I have a plan.
      I was keen on cooking the turkey sous vide, but have been vetoed by my a family member- "you can't feed grandma that bacteria-laden turkey! it never got hot!"
      I've tried to explain the process, and the safety, but I conceided. I'm cooking for a bunch of traditionalists, so I'm trying to keep it interesting, yet familiar and not too out of the box.
      I think I may have a more interesting plan now anyway.
      It goes like this-
      Break down the bird (from my CSA with Allandale Farm in Boston, MA, removing the breast skin in-tact
      break down the carcass, pan-roast it, and make stock.
      Make a tenderloin by stacking the breasts and glueing with Activa RM, and wrapping with the skin.
      two questions on this front:
      How long can the rolled "tenderloin" sit before cooking- can I roll it out 24 hours before showtime?
      Is there a decent way to add some flavor between the breasts- chopped sage/thyme, etc. or will this negatively affect the process? Will it cook OK?
      Braise the dark meat, following this Daniel Boulud recipe (ish.)
      Confit the wings. I currently have a test batch curing overnight, rubbed with a ton of salt, thyme, bay leaf, clove, tellicherry peppercorns, garlic, and some juniper. Picked up 7.5# tub of Hudson Valley Foie Gras duckfat for the cook.
      In addition, I'm going to do some truffled mashed potatoes, butternut squash soup with some smoked duck breast, and some veg- brussel sprouts, and something to keep the kids happy. Also pondering family-style (really partner-style) mac and cheese in some very small le crusets, following the Hattie's recipe.
      Is it worth brining the bird?
      I'm looking for reactions to this plan, and any improvements possible, or a good old-fashioned critique.
      Thoughts?
    • By Raamo
      HOST'S NOTE: This post and those that follow were split off from the pre-release discussion of Modernist Bread.
      *****
       
      Figured I don't need to dump all this into the contest thread - so I'll post here.  My journey to making my first MC loaf.
       
      Her's the poolish after >12 hours:

       
       
      Not pictured - water with yeast in it below the bread flour and poolish

       
      That went into the mixer and not long later I had a shaggy mass:
       

       
      That rested for a while - then mixed until medium gluten formation - a window pane that was both opaque and translucent (no picture for that slightly messy part)
       
      Folded and rested, folded and rested, I think this is 1/2 the mass now ready to rest one final time.
       

       
      Proofed it in the oven - I have a picture of that but it's just foggy window oven
       
      Then it went into the oven, here it is at max temp - 450 with steam turned on.
       

       
      Completed loaf:
       
      \
       
      And the crumb - this is awesome bread:

       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×