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maggiethecat

Recipes That Rock: 2009

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I made Cream Biscuits for the first time yesterday night, inspired by Sara Moulton. I consider myself a biscuit maven, and these are right up there with the finest. Easy too. The cream provides both the fat and the liquid. The oven's at 425.

Whisk together:

2 c. flour

1 T baking powder

salt

(I added chopped chives)

Stir in a cup, more or less of heavy cream, enough so that you can form a ball with your hands. Knead it a couple of times to incorporate everything. Pat or roll out, cut the biscuits and put them on an ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for about twenty minutes, or until they're pale gold.

Break out the butter .

As I remember, Sara said she learned the recipe from James Beard.


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

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1912-2008

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Varkenshaas

Don't ask me how to pronounce this, but this was the most tender pork tenderloin I have ever eaten with a fabulous mustard sauce.

Thanks for posting this. I made this the other night and the sauce was delicious. My husband is coming up with different ways to use the leftover sauce.

I too made it and it was indeed tasty. Thanks for posting!

I made it as well for Easter. Thumbs up! I also made a savory onion and gruyere bread pudding which I can recommend. Kim's French Onion Bread Pudding

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I must thank you for posting the link to this recipe. I have made it a few times last winter -- for myself for days' worth of lunches and as an accompaniment to roast chicken (served over a simple base of greens tossed with plain vinaigrette) for a dinner party. Everyone loved it. I love it, too.

Hey all --

Finally made a non-dessert recipe that is good enough to post on the Recipes that Rock thread. From smittenkitchen, and originally posted on orangette, two of my favorite food blogs of all time. A butternut squash and chickpea salad with tahini dressing. Fantastic. Filling. YUM!

http://smittenkitchen.com/2009/01/warm-but...chickpea-salad/


~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

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gallery_1890_1967_213018.jpg

Scrambled eggs with crème fraîche and chives

This photo shows sauteed morels in butter but you can pair it with just about any type of vegetable. I love this dish with asparagus or ramps in place of the mushrooms.

The eggs are super-rich but oh, so worth it. This takes as much time to make as a pot of risotto.

4 to 6 eggs

salt, to taste

pepper, to taste

crème fraîche

chives

Whisk eggs in a bowl. Place bowl over pot with boiling water, acting as a double boiler. Continue whisking eggs, and cook to desired doneness. Finish with crème fraîche and chives, season to taste with salt and pepper.

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gallery_1890_1967_213018.jpg

Scrambled eggs with crème fraîche and chives

This photo shows sauteed morels in butter but you can pair it with just about any type of vegetable.  I love this dish with asparagus or ramps in place of the mushrooms.

The eggs are super-rich but oh, so worth it.  This takes as much time to make as a pot of risotto.

4 to 6 eggs

salt, to taste

pepper, to taste

crème fraîche

chives

Whisk eggs in a bowl. Place bowl over pot with boiling water, acting as a double boiler. Continue whisking eggs, and cook to desired doneness. Finish with crème fraîche and chives, season to taste with salt and pepper.

Now, for an OLD recipe that rocks, per the Nero Wolfe Cookbook, cook the eggs in the same manner, over very low heat, but without the creme fraiche. Stir in up to 1 stick of butter, cut into small bits, until each bit is absorbed by the eggs. Called, I believe, buttered eggs. WOW!


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Oh my gosh, does this recipe from the PBS show "Everyday Cooking" (thanks Martha!) totally rock.Cherry Tomato crisp.Cherry Tomato Crisp.I made it as the lady on "Everyday Food" did it, viz: Don't grate your parm, just break in some chunks. Leave garlic whole. A few pulses. Like, ten seconds and twenty minutes to a baked tomato/crispy crunchy jamboree side dish, that incorporates  bright veg and starch. And texture.

Most highly recommended. And, so easy.

I made this last night to rave reviews!

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Oh my gosh, does this recipe from the PBS show "Everyday Cooking" (thanks Martha!) totally rock.Cherry Tomato crisp.Cherry Tomato Crisp.I made it as the lady on "Everyday Food" did it, viz: Don't grate your parm, just break in some chunks. Leave garlic whole. A few pulses. Like, ten seconds and twenty minutes to a baked tomato/crispy crunchy jamboree side dish, that incorporates  bright veg and starch. And texture.

Most highly recommended. And, so easy.

I made this last night to rave reviews!

Jean -- did you cut the cherry tomatoes in half or leave them whole? The recipe doesn't specify, but it seems like the topping wouldn't stick to the tomatoes if whole...

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I made the Cherry Tomato Crisp as part of DH's birthday dinner. It was very, very good! I forgot the part about just chunking up the parm... wish I'd done that.

When I made this dish, I was reminded of another favorite cherry tomato recipe. It's not new for us in 2009, but rediscoverd:

Orzo with Feta and Cherry Tomatoes

I made it tonight and it was every bit as good as remembered. It makes for great lunch leftovers, too!

Oh my gosh, does this recipe from the PBS show "Everyday Cooking" (thanks Martha!) totally rock.Cherry Tomato crisp.Cherry Tomato Crisp.I made it as the lady on "Everyday Food" did it, viz: Don't grate your parm, just break in some chunks. Leave garlic whole. A few pulses. Like, ten seconds and twenty minutes to a baked tomato/crispy crunchy jamboree side dish, that incorporates  bright veg and starch. And texture.

Most highly recommended. And, so easy.

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The best recipe in 2009 for me so far, is FLAKY CHEESE BISCUITS from the Fine Cooking site ....

http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/flaky-c...rms=52404,50048

I've seen them mentioned on eGullet before, but had never tried them. Tender, flaky, almost croissant-like, we couldn't stop wolfing them down! Best served warm, so re-heat in toaster oven, & they're just like fresh-baked.

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I made Cream Biscuits for the first time yesterday night, inspired by Sara Moulton. I consider myself a biscuit maven, and these are right up there with the finest. Easy too. The cream provides both the fat and the liquid. The oven's at 425.

Whisk together:

2 c. flour

1 T baking powder

salt

(I added chopped chives)

Stir in a cup, more or less of heavy cream, enough so that you can form a ball with your hands. Knead it a couple of times to incorporate everything. Pat or roll out, cut the biscuits and put them on an ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for about twenty minutes, or until they're pale gold.

Break out the butter .

As I remember, Sara said she learned the recipe from James Beard.

Thank you for posting this recipe. I'm sometimes looking for a way to use up whipping cream and the biscuits fill the bill. I prefer my baking powder biscuits, but my husband worked his way through several and the customers got the leftovers!

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Many moons ago (OK, 2 moons ago), tsquare posted about the blog of once prolific eG poster, Lorna (aka Ling). I visited, loved it, and volunteered (perhaps "begged" is a better word) to test some recipes.

Every recipe I've made so far has been a success (even with no adjustment to sugar content, my Japanese co-workers loved loved loved her lemon pound cake with sour cream glaze), but her buttermilk onion ring recipe is really outstanding. Even if you're not one who deep-fries, you've got to try this recipe. I've already made it twice, and I'm already planning to make it again! (And the leftovers actually stay crispy the next day!)

But I guess you'll have to wait till her cookbook comes out, or beg her to let you test it!

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I picked up "Cookin' Up A Storm," a book of recipes compiled from the New Orleans Times Picayune, and fell madly in love withthe recipe for Creole okra. Quick, easy, and delicious - not much more you can ask for. Also eminently adjustable - you can add sausage, shrimp, extra spice, mushrooms, you know it. Admittedly I now realize I sort of live on okra but I guess that's okay for a Louisiana girl...

I went to the site and I think this looks delicious. I will defineately make it when my okra is ready in the garden later this summer. Though on second thought I might not wait and use some frozen from the store.

Thanks for sharing. I love Creole dishes.

Amoreena

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This slow-roasted pork has become our go-to recipe for feeding a large crowd. Two ~8.5 lb. shoulders, roasted up this way (minus the veggies) the night before, a double batch of =Mark's mustard bbq sauce, a mess of burger buns, a few crockpots, and bingo! pulled pork sandwiches for two dozen people!

MelissaH


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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I've found most of the recipes that I've tried from this site to be somewhat unbalanced in flavor, but this one goes into the rotation. Fast, easy, delicious, and from the pantry. It reheated well for lunch, tho a fresh squeeze of lemon was nice at that point.

The breadcrumbs just make the whole thing.

pasta-with-chickpeas-and-lemon


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Yay for me. My first post on eGullet!

I've been working on a few things this year, attempting to replicate favourite dishes from oft-visited restaurants near my home and office.

The first one is a shrimp and white bean salad over mixed baby greens in a light lemon vinaigrette. The sweetness of the shrimp is accentuated by the earthy starchiness of cannelini beans, with the vinaigrette adding a slight acidic touch. A delicious salad from a small mom and pop pizza joint in Saddle Brook, NJ named "La Mezzaluna Trattoria".

I haven't gotten the vinaigrette just right, yet. It's a mixture (I think) of finely minced celery, minced red onion, lemon zest, parsley (maybe basil and oregano, too?), olive oil, and vinegar. It can't be too powerful, or you lose the interplay of shrimp and beans.

The second one is grilled Caribbean style pork chops, from the now defunct "Jimmy Armstrong's Saloon" in NYC. Actually, I've been trying to make these chops for a few years now, but have only recently come close to the real thing. Well, as real as I can remember. Armstrong's was a great little restaurant on the northern reaches of Hell's Kitchen which sadly went out of business when Jimmy died a few years ago. But, without a doubt, Jimmy made the best grilled chops in the world.

A few weeks ago, I tried making the marinade more like a brine, and that seems to have done the trick. I could never figure out he got so much garlic and bay flavorings into the meat, and how he made them so juicy. My last attempt was a little over the top, having let them sit in the marinade for 2 days. So now, I just have to back off some of the spices, and reduce marinating time, and I think I'll have it.

The last new thing that I've tried this year was my first Manhattan style clam chowder: http://www.recipezaar.com/Buckytoms-Manhat...-Chowder-354393

I made it for a pot luck "soup party" that my sister threw for my family in January, and it was a big hit. It was the only soup that everyone went back for seconds. I incorporated both fresh and canned clams, using chopped large clams as well as whole baby clams for different textures. Everyone asked how I got it to taste so "clammy".

I'm just beginning to tackle Korean food, so I hope to be able to make a good kalbi jim and/or naeng myun this summer.

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OH MY GOODNESS!!! We made something called Crash Hot Potatoes last night.

They are perfection. I can see them replacing just about every type of potato that we make except for mashed and au gratin. They are tender and crispy golden at the same time. No need to turn or worry about burning. I have made something similar where you smash a small cooked potato with your palms and then fry it in a lot of oil in a skillet. These potatoes let the oven do all the work. I can't get over what a winner they are.

OMG I want to make them again tonight!


"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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OH MY GOODNESS!!! We made something called Crash Hot Potatoes last night.

They are perfection. I can see them replacing just about every type of potato    that we make except for mashed and au gratin. They are tender and crispy golden at the same time. No need to turn or worry about burning. I have made something similar where you smash a small cooked potato with your palms and then fry it in a lot of oil in a skillet. These potatoes let the oven do all the work. I can't get over what a winner they are.

OMG I want to make them again tonight!

Where did the recipe come from? Can you share? I'm always on the lookout for new spud recipes.

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OH MY GOODNESS!!! We made something called Crash Hot Potatoes last night.

They are perfection. I can see them replacing just about every type of potato    that we make except for mashed and au gratin. They are tender and crispy golden at the same time. No need to turn or worry about burning. I have made something similar where you smash a small cooked potato with your palms and then fry it in a lot of oil in a skillet. These potatoes let the oven do all the work. I can't get over what a winner they are.

OMG I want to make them again tonight!

Where did the recipe come from? Can you share? I'm always on the lookout for new spud recipes.

it's here.


"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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Glad that you got the link to the recipe. I forgot to add it. Saw the comment about duck fat. That is something that we don't have on hand. I think that I will try to use bacon fat sometime when I make them. That is something that we always have in the frig. Actually, they were wonderful using olive oil. I don't know if the taste would be purer without adding another flavor component. (I have never had anything fried in duck fat.) I did sprinkle some with Lawreys' Garlic Salt and others with Kosher salt. Both were great. We were an hour past when we thought that dinner would be served and didn't get to cut any rosemary. I think that I will try chives the next time though. Now I am trying to figure out where I saw the recipe originally. When ever I like something this much, I always thnking that whoever liked this enough to refer to it, must have other good things to check out. It was not the site that the recipe comes from, however. That would be too easy.

If any of you try thet recipe, please pose results.


"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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OH MY GOODNESS!!! We made something called Crash Hot Potatoes last night.

They are perfection. I can see them replacing just about every type of potato    that we make except for mashed and au gratin. They are tender and crispy golden at the same time. No need to turn or worry about burning. I have made something similar where you smash a small cooked potato with your palms and then fry it in a lot of oil in a skillet. These potatoes let the oven do all the work. I can't get over what a winner they are.

OMG I want to make them again tonight!

Where did the recipe come from? Can you share? I'm always on the lookout for new spud recipes.

it's here.

Well thank you for that -- just reading about them was delicious. They look so beautiful -- like flowers. I'm thinking that they could sort of be finger food, in a messy kind of way. I'm imagining them standing in for twice-baked potatoes, with lots of creative toppings. And I bet they can be prepared ahead and popped into the oven for the final browning at the last minute. Perhaps even frozen.

The kind of thing that just makes life worth living.

- L.

[Edit to correct typos]


Edited by Lapin d'Argent (log)

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And here's a way to make them stove-top!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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