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The Cheesecake Topic


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I watched a program on TV called, How It's Made, on how cheesecakes are made. What I wanted to know, is that on the program they mentioned they added sour cream to the cheesecake batter that was specially cultured, does anyone know what they might have meant by specially cultured?

Edited by oli (log)
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  • 3 years later...

I’d like to make a cheesecake, and found a simple recipe that looks perfect for a first attempt. However, I have a couple of questions.

First, is there any alternative to a springform pan? Since I don’t have one, and will have to buy something, I’d like to know what, if any, other options there may be. And is there anything I should know about these pans, what to look for, to avoid, etc?

Second, I don’t care for the typical cream cheeses, like Philadelphia brand, that are made with gums, fillers, etc. Whenever I use cream cheese it’s usually one of the organic, natural brands. Their texture and consistency is different than the standard supermarket fare – creamier and not as firm. If using one of these natural cheeses, would I have to adjust the recipe in some way? Or might the cheesecake just come out a little lighter and fluffier, which is just fine with me.

Thanks

 ... Shel


 

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I'm also a relative beginner to cheesecakes, having made my first one about a year ago. My first few failed in more ways than I thought a dessert -could- fail, but eventually I got it right.

I bought a springform thinking they were necessary, but they are not, at least for the recipes I've been following.

Here's a bit of advice that doesn't come up in the recipes I've tried: the smoothness of the mix is essential, so run the mix batter through a sieve before pouring into the pan.

No comment on the granola cheeses, since I've never tried them.

This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

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Don't fear the cheesecake. Embrace the cheesecake, especially the New York Cheesecake. I always make mine in a springform pan and do not seive the batter. I do beat it with a flat beater for about 8 minutes before pouring it into the partially cooked crust, and cut through it with a spatula and rap it gently to remove air pockets. I also don't use a water bath. To avoid cracks on the surface, don't open the oven door to peak at it while it's cooking.

I have also never used a boutique cream cheese, so no help there.

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Cheesecake is considered the family dessert in my house, and all of us were taught to make them at a young age. Personally, I mix mine in a food processor as I find it gives me a better result than my mixer. I also make the batter first, then let it sit in the fridge while I make the crust in order to get some of the air out of it. I haven't heard of the seive, but it sounds interesting. I DO use a springform, but also put a pan of water in the oven. As with everyone else so far, I havent used anything other than the big cream cheese brands, so no help there.

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I have used Gina Marie cream cheese in cheesecakes before. It's been a while, but I didn't notice any difference in the baking. As mentioned before, smooth batter makes a difference. Straining is fine, especially if you have any lumps. I don't make regular cheesecakes very much, mostly goat cheese cheesecakes when I do. But, I have used the NY Cheesecake recipe from Cook's Illustrated, and it's very good.

I think a springform pan, or a cake pan with the push up bottom would be your best bet. They would be the easiest to get the cake out cleanly.

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I have used Gina Marie cream cheese in cheesecakes before. It's been a while, but I didn't notice any difference in the baking.

I think a springform pan, or a cake pan with the push up bottom would be your best bet. They would be the easiest to get the cake out cleanly.

Great to know about the cream cheese. I'd probably be using the Gina Marie, although there's another brand that's also quite similar that I've tried.

 ... Shel


 

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I’d like to make a cheesecake, and found a simple recipe that looks perfect for a first attempt. However, I have a couple of questions.

First, is there any alternative to a springform pan? Since I don’t have one, and will have to buy something, I’d like to know what, if any, other options there may be. And is there anything I should know about these pans, what to look for, to avoid, etc?

You can use a standard cake pan, but getting the cake out is a bit tricky. You will need parchment paper at the bottom of the pan before assembling. Once the cake is completely chilled, cut around the sides of the pan with a knife rinsed under warm water. Then, take a blow torch or other flame throwing utensil and gently warm the bottom of the pan. This will soften/melt the butter from the crust and aid in release. place a piece of plastic wrap over the top and invert the cake onto a platter. If you are lucky, the cake will slide out, otherwise you will probably have a mess.

Springform pans are the best option. I use a 9" springform bright steel pan, nothing fancy. I also have a 12" cake pan as my water bath.

Second, I don’t care for the typical cream cheeses, like Philadelphia brand, that are made with gums, fillers, etc. Whenever I use cream cheese it’s usually one of the organic, natural brands. Their texture and consistency is different than the standard supermarket fare – creamier and not as firm. If using one of these natural cheeses, would I have to adjust the recipe in some way? Or might the cheesecake just come out a little lighter and fluffier, which is just fine with me.

Thanks

I doubt that the cream cheese will cause any problems, but I am speculating. I have made cakes from goat cheese and never had a problem.

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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Springform pans are the best option. I use a 9" springform bright steel pan, nothing fancy. I also have a 12" cake pan as my water bath.

I doubt that the cream cheese will cause any problems, but I am speculating. I have made cakes from goat cheese and never had a problem.

So, if using a water bath with a springform pan, how do you keep the water from getting into the cake? The springform pans aren't water-tight, are they?

Goat cheese?! Hmm, my girlfriend loves goat cheese. Could I use just a regular cheesecake recipe and sub goat cheese, or would adjustments have to be made?

Thanks!

 ... Shel


 

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So, if using a water bath with a springform pan, how do you keep the water from getting into the cake? The springform pans aren't water-tight, are they?

Goat cheese?! Hmm, my girlfriend loves goat cheese. Could I use just a regular cheesecake recipe and sub goat cheese, or would adjustments have to be made?

Thanks!

Assemble the pan, and then use foil to wrap the outside of the pan. Go at least halfway up the sides. I've always used heavy duty foil because that's usually what I have on hand; if you use regular foil and it rips, use a second sheet.

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When buying a springform pan, look for a couple of things - make sure that the base snugs firmly into the sides, rather than being loose enough to spin or move, and look for a latch that snaps snugly into place. Also make sure that the base and the rings are of the same weight of metal. Apart from that, material and whatnot are up to you. I use a wide range of springforms, but the ones that have served me best are black steel with a coating on them of some sort, and have silver latches.

You should be able to sub goat cheese directly into the recipe provided it's been properly drained. Maybe make the smallest possible increment of the recipe and try it in tarts first, just to see how it sets up.

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Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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When buying a springform pan, look for a couple of things - make sure that the base snugs firmly into the sides, rather than being loose enough to spin or move, and look for a latch that snaps snugly into place. Also make sure that the base and the rings are of the same weight of metal. Apart from that, material and whatnot are up to you. I use a wide range of springforms, but the ones that have served me best are black steel with a coating on them of some sort, and have silver latches.

You should be able to sub goat cheese directly into the recipe provided it's been properly drained. Maybe make the smallest possible increment of the recipe and try it in tarts first, just to see how it sets up.

Thanks! As it turns out, Toots has a few springform pans - I should have asked her first. So, that issue is solved.

I am going to try a goat cheese version next week, after gathering the ingredients. I'll let everyone know how it turns out.

Thanks!

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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I don't think the texture will be compromised byyour cream cheese. My recipe uses cream cheese and cottage cheese. I run it through the blender and don't bother to strain because it's oh soo smooth. I use a spring form pan and no water bath. The center finishes cooking after I take it out of the oven. I haven't seen organic cream cheese here. Perhaps a new excuse to shop?

Ellen

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What about eggs? Many (Most?) of the recipes I've read include eggs, although I was wondering how the cheesecake may turn out if only egg yolks were used.

Thanks!

 ... Shel


 

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Richer, for one, and far less white, for two. I've got recipes that call for just yolks, and they tend to be banana or chocolate cheesecakes where the colour of the yolks won't affect the look of the final product, but I'd never go yolks-only in a plain white cheesecake simply because it would end up a sunny custard yellow colour.

Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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  • 4 years later...

Just made a cheesecake- use Kraft Philadelphia.

 

Recipe here, 

http://tasteasianfood.com/?p=1351

 

Would love to here your comments :)

 

CK(9).JPG

 

  • Like 3

My name is KP Kwan. I am a pharmacist turned restaurateur who lives in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I have worked in my restaurant more than ten years and since year 2012.

 

I am also a food blogger.  You can read my blog at http://tasteasianfood.com/

I am looking forward to learning and contributing topics about culinary skills in this forum.

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Very nice looking cheesecake, and thanks for the link. It looks a bit lighter and higher than a "regular" NY cheesecake, and I see the recipe separates the eggs and beats the whites separately, which would account for that lightness. But that's a beautiful slice all the same. 

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I use cream cheese purchased at a cheese counter.  Fairway has a nice cream cheese, so does Murray's.  I don't find any discernable difference from using Philadelphia cream cheese.

 

I think cheesecake is very much a matter of personal taste.  One of those things where people might say, "I only like my own."  I would not bother with a cheesecake I did not make myself -- for me, having all organic dairy in there is very important.

 

Mine has a sour cream topping and I like the contrast of the sweet cake and the sour topping.  I've never strained mine or saw a need to, but I'll try it next time.  I'm all about extremely smooth and creamy.

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I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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I part chevre, 1 part cream cheese ( the real deal or philly ) ) 1 part sour cream greek full fat yogurt or quark .amts vary per cake size..some get heavy cream as well...i go light on the sugar ..have put extra yolks in but then it was custard tasting...i liked it! .everything room temp, no mixer or food processor ...( I put a small spoon of starch in if I think it needs it) Stir by hand and not a single turn more

... Double foil ..pan of water ..low slow cool in the oven ..no cracks ever

It is my husband's 35th favorite dessert i have had lots of practice

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why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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