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Food Dehydrators: The Topic


Gabe Q
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On 9/14/2018 at 6:38 AM, rotuts said:

not very far Id say , yet

 

resting comfortably in its box.

 

I do hope to get to the Indian Market for some green Thai Birds 

 

to dry out and also make some green chili oil.

 

someday.

Dude! Dry them?! 

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A while ago I did one apple, which I turned into some kind of meat or vegetable sauce. Very yummy.

None of the following have been used yet:

  • I dehydrated some strips of Japanese eggplant the other day.
  • Also some cherry tomatoes, which after 15 hours were still half dry.
  • Today I'm marinating zucchini which has been sliced in half, seeds removed, then sliced into 3/16" moons. I will probably start drying it today.
  • I also have more zucchini which has had the seeds removed which I plan to grate. (Can I dehydrate these two zucchini products at the same time?)

Jo, have you ever dehydrated peaches?

Edited by TdeV
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4 hours ago, TdeV said:

A while ago I did one apple, which I turned into some kind of meat or vegetable sauce. Very yummy.

None of the following have been used yet:

  • I dehydrated some strips of Japanese eggplant the other day.
  • Also some cherry tomatoes, which after 15 hours were still half dry.
  • Today I'm marinating zucchini which has been sliced in half, seeds removed, then sliced into 3/16" moons. I will probably start drying it today.
  • I also have more zucchini which has had the seeds removed which I plan to grate. (Can I dehydrate these two zucchini products at the same time?)

Jo, have you ever dehydrated peaches?

 

Please don't think less of me for this:  I confess the only things I've dehydrated are apples and cherries.  Apples work really well.  Cherries take a long time to dry out and the results are difficult to process with my teeth.  The cherries I've dried are very sweet but they do not taste much like cherries.

 

When you dehydrate vegetables like eggplant and zucchini can you eat them raw?

 

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16 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

When you dehydrate vegetables like eggplant and zucchini can you eat them raw?

 

I don't know. This is a new venture for me.

 

I did marinate some zucchini chips, and I'll report on the flavour.

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This brings to mind dried apples, which my grandmother would make by the bushel every fall.

 

First, we picked and peeled lots and lots of apples. Then cored and sliced them about 1/8 inch thick. Then they were carefully spread on a white sheet stretched across the roof of the wellhouse, which caught the south-facing sun, early in the morning, and taken in if rain threatened or in the early evening. They lived tied up in their somewhat-less-than-white, by this time, sheet in a kitchen chair overnight, and went back out the next day. Seems the drying took about four or five days, depending on the weather. Then they were moved to a fabric bag and hung from a joist in the basement, from which they'd be pulled a couple of cups at a time to be rehydrated, simmered, spiced and used as the filling for fried apple pies.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I have an Excalibur drier which I find fantastic.

Recently I wanted to convert my frozen roasted garlic and regular garlic into dried powder.  It took a number of hours..lost track how many…at least 24.  Just sliced the garlic.

the powder is amazing.  Just like when I dried sliced onions and made a powder.

yes the house smelt delicious.🤯

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The marinated zucchini was fantastic! Some other stuff in the oven hadn't dried, so I left everything in for 18 hours. I had 2+ trays full and I have eaten it all . . . I'm going to do this again and take it out sooner – I think it might be better "less dry".

 

IMG_3418s_cropped.thumb.jpg.23adc925e81e2d69fa0ab0ffbb0e65e7.jpg

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The recipe from Mary T. Bell called for 1/4 cup soy sauce (but mine is lighter sauce so I used more), 2 tablespoons rice vinegar, 1 tablespoon roasted garlic (changed to 4 freshly roasted cloves), 1 tablespoon sesame oil for 4 cups raw zucchini chips. The chips are created by halving large zucchini and scooping out the seeds, then slicing on a mandolin.

 

They're very addictive – even as dried out as those pictured above.

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  • 2 weeks later...
1 hour ago, TdeV said:

@kayb, up this thread a bit you mention dehydrating roma tomatoes. Do you skin them first?

No, I don't. I usually wind up just eating them out of hand or tossing them in a salad, so the skin isn't problematic. If I were adding to a tomato sauce, I'd probably blitz it in the blender or food processor first to deal with the skins.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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  • 5 weeks later...

When making a leather (e.g. applesauce), how do you make sure that the glop is all the same thickness? I've looked on the Excalibur site and, actually, can't tell whether the trays have a lip on them, so I've no guesses as to how it's done.

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35 minutes ago, TdeV said:

When making a leather (e.g. applesauce), how do you make sure that the glop is all the same thickness? I've looked on the Excalibur site and, actually, can't tell whether the trays have a lip on them, so I've no guesses as to how it's done.

I just eyeball it pretty much.  And I often put chopped walnuts in the 'glop' which makes getting a level playing surface even more difficult.  I've never found that it mattered much in the end. 

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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55 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@Darienne, doesn't the glop spread all over the place? How do you keep it in place?

I would be using only enough in one place to spread only so far.  (Actually, I make the apple leather on cookie sheets in the oven.)  

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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  • 2 weeks later...

What's the hottest I can dehydrate fresh peaches?

 

I've found that peaches do better in @Ann_T's Summer Torte if they spend a little time in the dehydrator. The peaches are now peeled and cut, and they're in the Anova Oven at 127°F/53°C. Problem is that it's 3 p.m. and I'd like to deliver a slice of the torte today.

 

It would help if I could accomplish some drying of the peaches in about 2 hours.

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3 minutes ago, TdeV said:

What's the hottest I can dehydrate fresh peaches?

 

I've found that peaches do better in @Ann_T's Summer Torte if they spend a little time in the dehydrator. The peaches are now peeled and cut, and they're in the Anova Oven at 127°F/53°C. Problem is that it's 3 p.m. and I'd like to deliver a slice of the torte today.

 

It would help if I could accomplish some drying of the peaches in about 2 hours.

A quick Googling says you can go up to 140*F. I would think that would be okay since you’re going to be cooking them more anyway.

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