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dankphishin

Foraging for favorites

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I will get..not exactly from my yr..but the forest behind me...nettles..oyster mushrooms...and I picked my first grey morels..Sunday in a down pour

Later in the season.. sweet clover


Edited by Paul Bacino (log)

Its good to have Morels

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... the day lilies that I buy in the local Asian grocery to make Hot and Sour Soup with the Day Lilies which grow around the house.

 

:-)

 

Have a look at this...

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22%E9%87%91%E9%87%9D%22&client=firefox-a&hs=0cu&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=fflb&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=4TFhU7jnOdOayATXiIHoBw&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1189&bih=941

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Of course, huiray.  How stupid of me.  :raz:   I've never connected the day lilies that I buy in the local Asian grocery to make Hot and Sour Soup with the Day Lilies which grow around the house.

 

Doh..me either..


Its good to have Morels

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I've had daylilly beds for some years. I've only used the tubers a few times, but the flowers are standard summer fair.

 

Used to pick dandelion, but they eventually got out of control, and so those are mostly gone.

 

Have beds of chive and wild garlic. Wonder if ramps would transplant.

 

Hope to get a mushroom log going in a portion of the lot where trees now make too much shade for most plants.

 

Used to have some beds of chufa grass. While it is usually planted as a wildlife forage, the rhizome nodules, if toasted, are quite good. Mine didn't naturalize well, so I took them out years ago.

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The "Bread and Cheese" (hawthorn buds) will be ready soon! MMMMMmmmmmmm!


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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The relatively short period that I can raid the wild horseradish greens while they're still small and tender shouldn't be too far off. They're not technically in my yard but they're just on the other side of the fence.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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The relatively short period that I can raid the wild horseradish greens while they're still small and tender shouldn't be too far off. They're not technically in my yard but they're just on the other side of the fence.

 

How do you use them? I am headed to a possible foraging spot Saturday.

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How do you use them? I am headed to a possible foraging spot Saturday.

I use them pretty much as any other green. Steamed, stir fried, etc. I also use them to wrap things before baking or steaming. They impart a delicate but noticeable flavor. If I catch them when they're really young and tender, I use them as salad greens.

 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Another wonderful early spring Mother Nature gift is Hosta.

 

dcarch

 

Beef Tenderloin On Hosta Shoots

hosta2014.jpg

 

tenderloinhosta.jpg

 

tenderloinhosta2.jpg

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Another wonderful early spring Mother Nature gift is Hosta.

 

dcarch

 

 

Are those forsythia blossoms? 

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Are those forsythia blossoms? 

 

Indeed, they are.

 

dcarch

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I've had daylilly beds for some years. I've only used the tubers a few times, but the flowers are standard summer fair.  Edible?

 

Used to pick dandelion, but they eventually got out of control, and so those are mostly gone.

 

Have beds of chive and wild garlic. Wonder if ramps would transplant.

 

Hope to get a mushroom log going in a portion of the lot where trees now make too much shade for most plants.

 

Used to have some beds of chufa grass. While it is usually planted as a wildlife forage, the rhizome nodules, if toasted, are quite good. Mine didn't naturalize well, so I took them out years ago.


Its good to have Morels

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Wonder why our raccoons eat every food plant we've tried to grow but leave the hosta shoots alone?  It would give me great satisfaction to eat something they didn't get! 

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I've got a nice salad patch going with young Dandilion, Gallant Soldiers, Goosefoot, and Malabar Spinach in it, if that counts.  They were all gifts left by the birds that I've fostered because they're so dang tasty.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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I never knew hosta were edible!  I mean, I know the deer love them, but I didn't know people eat them too...

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MANY years ago, former neighbor (RIP) planted bamboo in low corner of his yard.  Eventually, it started RUNNING.   It's TOTALLY invasive, but could stp on sprouts and they didn't come back... just kept running underground.  I was teaching ESL/ABE classes at a community college and mentioned it was bamboo "season" in NJ.  Asian ladies PERKED up... said fresh bamboo shoots were something like $20/lb in CHinatowns.  I brought in bags full for hem and got some interesting/tasty lunches in the process.

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------------------------

 

Have beds of chive and wild garlic. Wonder if ramps would transplant.

 

-----------------------------

 

Ramps transplant well.

 

Last year I bought some ramps. I ate only the tops and planted the bulbs. I got ramps this year in my yard! I will have a lot more next season.

 

 Leg of lamb was $2.99 a lb. So I cut some of the ramp tops and made ramp jam. 

 

This dish is Lamb, ramp jam and yams.

 

dcarch

 

2914RAMPS.jpg

 

lamblegrampsyams4.jpg

 

lamblegrampsyams.jpg

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Ramps transplant well.

 

Last year I bought some ramps. I ate only the tops and planted the bulbs. I got ramps this year in my yard! I will have a lot more next season.

 

 Leg of lamb was $2.99 a lb. So I cut some of the ramp tops and made ramp jam. 

 

This dish is Lamb, ramp jam and yams.

We've got lots of wild garlic in the garden too ... ramp jam sounds intriguing ... could you guide me to a recipe?

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We've got lots of wild garlic in the garden too ... ramp jam sounds intriguing ... could you guide me to a recipe?

 

Sure, a little different from Soba's:

 

The ramp jam recipe:

2 tablespoons olive oil 

2 cups ramps, chopped (leaves only) 

1 large onions, halved and sliced 

1 tablespoon sea salt 

1/2 cup white vinegar 

1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger 

1/2 cup sugar 

salt and pepper to taste 

2 tablespoon butter 

4 cloves garlic 

½ box SURE-JELL Fruit Pectin

Cook until onion becomes very soft 

Blend everything to a thick sauce.

Chill and serve. 

 

dcarch

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Today I visited the garden of the poet John Betjeman in West Ilsley, Berkshire. I learned that wild garlic can be quite invasive...

20140511_143147 (640x480) (640x480).jpg

 

We got permission to pick some for dinner. It's waiting outside the back door. Don't bring this stuff inside until you need it!

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garlic mustard (now just the flowers and young young leaves at the top.)

 

purslane (later, august or so.)

 

milkweed shoots 

 

ramps

 

dandelion (not this year as we got a puppy and she pees on the front yard where the dandelions are)

 

daylily buds

 

bass tree flowers

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We have ramps, and I gave some to my dad.  They transplanted very well!  In our yard, they're on a wooded hillside, but they're doing great for him in a border garden next to some roses and mint. 

 

We also have morels, which just came up, and lots of violets.  We'll have to try the daylilies, too.  Later in the year we'll have wild black cherries.  We also have tons of highbush cranberry, though I was disappointed to find it was the invasive, non-native.  It really tastes terrible! 

 

From the actual garden, here in WI, we're just getting rhubarb, asparagus and pea shoots.

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Still more! I love early spring!

 

dcarch

 

sous vide prime rib on violet greens and hosta shoots

primeribvioletgreens2_zpsf073055c.jpg

 

primeribvioletgreens3_zpseece7036.jpg

 

primeribvioletgreens_zpsebd7c31c.jpg

 

 

Lilac ice cream

lilacicecream2_zpsc3039ddb.jpg

 

lilacicecream_zpse0d95814.jpg

 

lilacicecream3_zps9ab39d90.jpg

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We have lilacs all over the farm.  They escaped from the other farm house many decades ago.  Would love your recipe for lilac ice cream, dcarch.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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