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Interesting NYT article about texture in the culinary experience


cdh
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I found the linking to evolution and colonialism a bit of a long stretch. I think there have been many discussions about the stereotypical "white-bread" US food leanings. But it is a big country with lots of variation. Example Serious Eats piece on the Chitlin Strut  https://www.seriouseats.com/chitlin-strut-salley-south-carolina I look at the texture thing as a lack of familiarity coupled with a general culture that does not historically discuss food. Though I am 1st gen American my exposure to food was affected by WW2 and how that food dearth affected options in my community that carried over to US.  Today I want tendon in my pho and my Panamanian introduced me to cow foot souo which became a comfort food for me. I was more surprised in the article about all the studies - who the heck funds this stuff and why?

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3 hours ago, cdh said:

Thank you. That made for an interesting read. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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@heidih, thanks for linking this relevant article.   I can personally relate to the author while moving the conversation to France where I flirted with, danced with and finally fell in love with andouillette.    As the author writes, the cook is the crux since all innards are not equal.    But our terrors are our barriers.    And revelation is emancipating.  

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eGullet member #80.

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  • 3 weeks later...

While I'm sure it is behind a paywall, the NY Times Magazine has a recent article on whether it is disgusting to eat tomatoes with mayonnaise.  The dispute is between a tomato and mayonnaise loving Eastern European mother and her Taiwanese husband, along with their three children, who are revolted by the mother's enjoyment of such a disgusting texture.

 

Since my dinner tonight is tomatoes and mayonnaise, I assert that I have standing.

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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8 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

While I'm sure it is behind a paywall, the NY Times Magazine has a recent article on whether it is disgusting to eat tomatoes with mayonnaise.  The dispute is between a tomato and mayonnaise loving Eastern European mother and her Taiwanese husband, along with their three children, who are revolted by the mother's enjoyment of such a disgusting texture.

 

Since my dinner tonight is tomatoes and mayonnaise, I assert that I have standing.

 

It was a "Judge John Hodgman" column. Here's a shareable link.

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

"Imagine all the food you have eaten in your life and consider that you are simply some of that food, rearranged."  -Max Tegmark, physicist

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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1 hour ago, kayb said:

Tomatoes should almost always be eaten with mayonnaise.

The article, which in general I thought was a waste of newsprint, did lead me to examine how I felt about tomatoes and mayonnaise. I have to say I rarely think of the two together. I am not absolutely averse to a little mayo on a BLT but I don't think I'd miss it if it wasn't there.  

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Brings to mind Harriet the Spy's everyday lunch sandwich White bread, mayo and tomato. As a fan I was inspired to try it and sure others were similarly lured.

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With fresh brioche or a good white pullman loaf, Duke's mayo and a perfect ripe summer tomato it's hard to go wrong. Even better when you add a thin slice of a Vidalia onion. Very rarely do those four things happen to appear at the same time in my kitchen,  but if they do, that's what I make. And a BLT just has to have mayo or the earth will tilt off its axis. Okay, maybe not, but is it worth the risk?

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3 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

And a BLT just has to have mayo or the earth will tilt off its axis.

I suspect that just as the world or at least North America splits on the Miracle Whip/(Duke's, Hellmann's) divide so they split on the need for any or none. I know my best friend considers a refrigerator devoid of Miracle Whip barely even a useful appliance. I, on the other hand, might buy the smallest possible container for a particular purpose. It was never part of my life growing up and so it's not an essential part of my life now. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, IndyRob said:

Never trust anyone who can use the word 'deliquesce' in a sentence.  But even worse, one who finds a reason to do so.

Well, it's pretty much unavoidable in mushrooming circles. Much like "eponymous" among music critics, I suppose.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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5 minutes ago, chromedome said:

Well, it's pretty much unavoidable in mushrooming circles. Much like "eponymous" among music critics, I suppose.

Interesting.  I wondered how the word would relate so I did a search...

 

The Disgusting Details of Deliquescence

If it’s worth it to you to get a little technical to learn even more about how mushrooms turn to muck, this section is for you.

 

Is this the proper context?  I'm not sure. (https://blog.mycology.cornell.edu/2008/07/01/the-dish-on-deliquescence-in-coprinus-species/)

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57 minutes ago, IndyRob said:

Interesting.  I wondered how the word would relate so I did a search...

 

The Disgusting Details of Deliquescence

If it’s worth it to you to get a little technical to learn even more about how mushrooms turn to muck, this section is for you.

 

Is this the proper context?  I'm not sure. (https://blog.mycology.cornell.edu/2008/07/01/the-dish-on-deliquescence-in-coprinus-species/)

Yup, that's it. Shaggymanes are a wonderful culinary mushroom, but you have to cook 'em immediately!

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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11 minutes ago, chromedome said:

Yup, that's it. Shaggymanes are a wonderful culinary mushroom, but you have to cook 'em immediately!

Yeah, you need to catch it before it deliquesces.

 

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Shaggy inkcaps or shaggy manes need to be picked when young. They generally then last a couple of days in the fridge before deliquescing (despite what Wikipedia says). They are widely available here in supermarkets.

 

The word itself has been used in English for almost 300 years, but existed in Latin long before that. It is applied to certain mushrooms but also more generally, including ironically.

 

800px-Coprinus_comatus2.jpg.433ca0098744

 

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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