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Don't ask for steak tartare in my neck of the woods...


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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Not serve a rare steak? Seriously silly rule.  Eat at your own risk.

 

If they are all that damned concerned about public health they ought to ban raw veg. That's where big epidemics have come from lately.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Not serve a rare steak? Seriously silly rule.  Eat at your own risk.

 

If they are all that damned concerned about public health they ought to ban raw veg. That's where big epidemics have come from lately.

 

 

It doesn't apply to steak, just to ground meats.

 

 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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I think tartare is a fairly "niche" offering in most places, and New Brunswick in the main is pretty conservative about food (a bastion of the traditional "meat and potatoes, lots of gravy, and if you *must* put vegetables on the plate keep 'em small and to the side where I can ignore them" cooking style).

 

I was actually more surprised that some of the other 10 premises were serving burgers cooked rare or medium. Around here, that's like offering someone half-raw chicken: they'll never be back, and neither will anyone they know (or connect with on social media).

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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16 minutes ago, chromedome said:

It doesn't apply to steak, just to ground meats.

 

 

So if the tartare was chopped finely it'd be OK?

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7 minutes ago, gfweb said:

So if the tartare was chopped finely it'd be OK?

No, it's the chopping and mixing that's the issue. Any potential pathogens are ordinarily at the surface of the piece of muscle, and chopping/grinding/mixing transfers them from the surface to the entire quantity of meat. That's the logic behind having a higher recommended temperature for ground meats (the USDA, as well as the CFIA) than for whole cuts.

 

 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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these are commercial establishments .

 

it makes sense to reduce risk :   Illness ,suits etc.

 

you want extra rare hamburger , ir raw ground beef ?

 

make it at home  its not hard to do.

 

I doubt a commercial establishment went

 

out of business for dropping steak tartare from the menu.

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54 minutes ago, Maison Rustique said:

I seldom see it on menus here in Kansas City and we are beef country. Go figure. 

Bluestem had a very good one. 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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I love steak tartare, the iteration I had at the Catbird's Seat in Nashville being at the top of the list for best I've had. I have a couple of beef filets in the freezer I'm saving for that very purpose.

 

ChefSteps has a good recipe I've used.

 

Catbird Seat added pickled nasturtiums, which provided a wonderful tart counterpoint.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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22 minutes ago, kayb said:

Catbird Seat added pickled nasturtiums, which provided a wonderful tart counterpoint.

 

The caper like seed pods?

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2 hours ago, heidih said:

The caper like seed pods?

My recollection is it was the flowers, just lightly vinegar'ed.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I enjoy a nice beef tartare - with raw egg in the well....

I am however _exceedingly_ picky about where I order it.

 

I ask a lot of 'funny' questions, , , any stumbles/mumbles/I thinks . . . or any remote hint that it's pre-prepared and keep cold ready for service is an order killer...

 

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Not my neck of the woods but ...

 

I've eaten tatare of bovine, piscene and avian species. Steak, tuna, swordfish, squab and goose. The goose tartare was in Reykjavik and was excellent!

 

The rest were ordered in restaurants in the greater Boston and Worcester Massachusetts areas.

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