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Starting a high profile new restaurant (after closing another)


gfron1
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There's an article about Rob and Bulrush on the BBC News website for December 3.

 

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It was during the first interlude of my inaugural foray into Ozarkian food, moments before the toasted koji butter-cooked winter squash was set in front of me, and not long after the aroma of persimmon-wood smoked cornbread – fixed atop a rich, blonde pool of sorghum custard – had hijacked my olfactory nerve, when Rob Connoley shifted my attention, halting the sensory delight.

 

Edited by Alex (log)
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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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  • 1 month later...
9 minutes ago, kayb said:

Good piece on Rob and Bulrush in Barron's.

 

Here

 

 

Agreed.

 

I'm hoping Bulrush will be back to indoor dining by the spring, or early summer at the latest. I'm looking forward to planning another road trip.

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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4 hours ago, Alex said:

I'm hoping Bulrush will be back to indoor dining by the spring, or early summer at the latest. I'm looking forward to planning another road trip.

Thanks Kay, and I know I'm remiss in posting here...but so much has happened over the past year and emotionally it's just hard...but you all get it. Alex, we are already open for in-house dining, limiting to just 6 families a night (normally that means 12-14 in a space the is rated for 100). 

 

FWIW, here is my most recent shared info:

Here is my road map for 2021:
1. We have been conducting genealogical research on freed slaves from the Coffman, MO area. With the loss of our SLU History interns (due to COVID and SLU moving off campus), we haven't been able to get any more recent family connections than the 1980s...we're very close. I want to finalize this research and work with any living decedents to support them in sharing their story, if interested.
 
2. We had been working with the National Archives to identify shipping records, agricultural records or tax records related to the Missouri farmers/researchers who sent rootstock to France in the 1860s and 70s. Surely there will be some record of it leaving the country or entering France. By finding the records, our ultimate goal is to identify a farm, a town, a region where Missouri rootstock was used with more detail than what we currently have.
 
3. Our 1841 seed project had a great start last year. I want more farmers, more production, and more seeds and produce getting out to the general public to excite people about varietals that have not been grown or eaten in this area in generations.
 
4. Back in April I had a chef "rant" about the "fad" of locavore restaurants. I've been chewing on this for a long, long time. It has become clear to me that those of us who grew up on the Michael Pollan school of thought and the Laura Reilly awareness of how restaurants use this, have failed at maintaining awareness of the principals and hard facts around why local is important. It's not a fad and never has been so expect to see cold, hard numbers from me throughout the year. And I'm a believer in actions not words, so we will dig even deeper, and explain why, very publicly.
 
5. Lastly, I am so excited about working with Tosha Phonix and EVOLVE. A small part of her work is supporting African American growers in the STL area. We're not sure where this relationship may go yet, but we're committed to finding out both with support and finances.
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I am in awe of your focus, passion, attention to detail, and sensitivity to the big picture. As always look forward to hearing about your journey.

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As usual, so much has happened since my last post. A while back I found an old pamphlet showing cemeteries down near my family cabin. It included a "slave cemetery." That cemetery is now on the campus of Crown Vineyard, which used to be the John Coffman farm. While digging around I found a WPA era interview of free slaves HERE. Searching through I found three slaves who were enslaved on John Coffman's farm. My history interns spent most of the past year doing genealogical research, and two weeks ago finished the family trees for each of them.

 

I'm not sure where this will lead to, but I want keep things rolling to find out. A few days ago I reached out to the great, great, grand daughter of Mariah Douthit, and tonight she responded! 

 

I know none of this makes sense for a restaurant, but I also can't imagine not following these leads.

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19 hours ago, gfron1 said:

As usual, so much has happened since my last post. A while back I found an old pamphlet showing cemeteries down near my family cabin. It included a "slave cemetery." That cemetery is now on the campus of Crown Vineyard, which used to be the John Coffman farm. While digging around I found a WPA era interview of free slaves HERE. Searching through I found three slaves who were enslaved on John Coffman's farm. My history interns spent most of the past year doing genealogical research, and two weeks ago finished the family trees for each of them.

 

I'm not sure where this will lead to, but I want keep things rolling to find out. A few days ago I reached out to the great, great, grand daughter of Mariah Douthit, and tonight she responded! 

 

I know none of this makes sense for a restaurant, but I also can't imagine not following these leads.

I, for one, find it fascinating and am anxious to hear more!

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18 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

I, for one, find it fascinating and am anxious to hear more!

Cemeteries, location, headstones/tombstones/monuments and proximity of graves can tell lots about culture, mores and relations, I too find it fascinating. And all that influences food culture by trickle down.

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